Welcome Guest!
In order to take advantage of all the great features that Waterloo Region Connected has to offer, including participating in the lively discussions below, you're going to have to register. The good news is that it'll take less than a minute and you can get started enjoying Waterloo Region's best online community right away.
or Create an Account




Thread Rating:
  • 11 Vote(s) - 3.64 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
General Urban Kitchener Updates and Rumours
(Yesterday, 10:48 AM)Rainrider22 Wrote: The plan is to make this hospital a new super hospital.  It will be the only Emerg department in KW...  That's a problem. if it isn't central.

At this point, I would personally not characterize it as a "plan" yet, it's really more at the idea or concept stage. Plenty of things will be discussed and revised before actual plans are made.
Reply


(Yesterday, 12:55 PM)tomh009 Wrote:
(Yesterday, 10:48 AM)Rainrider22 Wrote: The plan is to make this hospital a new super hospital.  It will be the only Emerg department in KW...  That's a problem. if it isn't central.

At this point, I would personally not characterize it as a "plan" yet, it's really more at the idea or concept stage. Plenty of things will be discussed and revised before actual plans are made.

Where does the idea that this would be the only Emergency department come from?

It’s a horrible, obviously stupid idea; but are we just speculating that the reason for the large land requirement is because services will be centralized (what’s it called if things are centralized into a non-central location?), or is there a concept document somewhere which proposes that Emergency should be consolidated?

There are at least 2 reasons I can think of off the top of my head why this level of consolidation is clearly inappropriate:

  1. Travel time. Obvious, shouldn’t need further explanation.
  2. Resiliency. What happens if an Emergency department has to close for some reason, such as fire, terrorist attack, pathogen outbreak, …?

This is sufficiently clear that if a supposed expert were to come out in favour of the consolidation, I would question the relevance of their expertise, not the points I make above.
Reply
(Yesterday, 10:48 AM)Rainrider22 Wrote: The plan is to make this hospital a new super hospital.  It will be the only Emerg department in KW...  That's a problem. if it isn't central.

I'm well acquainted with many of the higher administrative staff at GRH, so maybe I can ask around and see what sort of goals they're aiming to achieve. Maybe they can share some of the details as to how they're envisioning this new hospital to function like and where it might be. But yeah whatever the plan is now, it's be very preliminary and in early stages so they might have no idea.

It would be nice if they could buy the Sun Life parking lot nextdoor and build a new building there (putting all the parking underground). It's not a big location, but you could build a taller hospital (say 15-16 floors or more) and put a state of the art ER and acute care units there. Then, renovate and transform the existing building into chronic care units, maintain the GRH cancer centre, expand the AIMH/CAIP and PICA (adult inpatient mental health/child adolescent inpatient psychiatry/psychiatric intensive care area) and grow the outpatient stuff. Hell, they could purchase some property across the street even: the CTV studios are for sale and they could consolidate that, the CoK parking lot and that soccer field into one property and build another structure there, using some tunnels as well as walkways above ground to connect the two buildings. GRH is partnered with both the University of Waterloo and Conestoga College (and I think Laurier for psychology/social work) so they could even have that act as a teaching wing of the hospital. That way, it's all still very central to the region and can utilize existing space, rather than move it way out to the middle of nowhere.
Reply
(Yesterday, 10:48 AM)Rainrider22 Wrote: The plan is to make this hospital a new super hospital.  It will be the only Emerg department in KW...  That's a problem. if it isn't central.

I must have misread the announcement, because what I got from it is that the current GRH location on King Street would retain an emergency department.

The three main components from the website:
* A new, state-of-the-art hospital site in Kitchener-Waterloo.
* Renewing and repurposing the existing mid-town K-W Campus as an ambulatory and urgent care centre.
* Renewing and expanding the Freeport Campus in Kitchener for modernized and expanded rehabilitation capacity.

Is an "ambulatory and urgent care centre" different from an emergency department?
Reply
(Yesterday, 02:38 PM)timc Wrote: Is an "ambulatory and urgent care centre" different from an emergency department?

Yes, very different from an emergency department.

An urgent care centre is a step between a walk-in clinic and an emergency department. We already have some locally, like https://onyxurgentcare.com/ , but I assume the one at GRH would be 24/7. But it's not somewhere an ambulance would take you.

Ambulatory care is a synonym for outpatient care, where they treat you without a full hospital admission. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambulatory_care

The fact they refer to it as repurposing the midtown site I think means they're planning to discontinue emergency services there, otherwise it would just be an addition.
Reply
Would the Bramm St. yard be a large enough property?
Reply
(Yesterday, 03:31 PM)TMKM94 Wrote: Would the Bramm St. yard be a large enough property?

Debbie Chapman and the NIMBYs in the area would never allow that in their backyard!
Reply
Exactly. Think of all the sirens that would disturb the rich retirees. They can't have medical care to save lives in their neighbourhood. The barely used asphalt and gravel parking lots full of weeds are an important heritage feature of the city and must be protected at all costs. Chapman 2022 - Make Kitchener Awful Again.
Reply
(Yesterday, 03:31 PM)TMKM94 Wrote: Would the Bramm St. yard be a large enough property?

No, not even remotely close. The Bramm lot is only about 7 acres. If you include the undeveloped properties along Park and Victoria (that were rejected for development this week) you still only get to 11 acres.

In fact the entire area between the mainline tracks and Victoria from Park to King is still only 40 acres or so. A 60 acre site is utterly massive. Hence why it almost certainly cannot be located centrally.
Reply
Gatineau just chose a 70 acre site for their new 600 bed hospital.
Reply
Why is a 44-storey highrise being built in downtown Kitchener with no public discussion?

The development requires no approval by city councillors, even though it will be a huge change from what is there now, Luisa D’Amato writes
Reply
(4 hours ago)Acitta Wrote: Why is a 44-storey highrise being built in downtown Kitchener with no public discussion?

When zoning allows new development: "This is outrageous, why is there no public debate about this development?"

When zoning doesn't allow new development: "This is outrageous, why aren't they sticking to the zoning?"

I'm starting to thing people just dislike change...
Reply
Wahhhh wahh wahh. All these NIMBYs do is complain. The Record is also very complicit in the regression angle, with the same handful of shitty journalists writing story after story about how bad all this change is. Where are the articles in support of things? No matter what is happening, the same couple people write article after article about why something is bad.

Honestly...this region is extremely frustrating to work in and I've worked in cities all over the country and world. I rarely see this much opposition to anything good. If you don't like it, move the hell away.
Reply
(1 hour ago)ac3r Wrote: The Record is also very complicit in the regression angle, with the same handful of shitty journalists writing story after story about how bad all this change is.

I would actually say that D'Amato is not so much complaining about the building -- she is writing more about the bonusing structure built into the 1985 zoning by-law. She says it has achieved its goals, and that's a good thing. But that it's time to adjust how it works. And I do agree that the quid-pro-quo of bonusing should be adjusted, not to prevent density, but to ensure that the density brings appropriate value to the city.

Quote:Those of us who remember downtown Kitchener in the mid-1980s, its many problems, and the repeated failed attempts to breathe life into it, are pleased to see so many people living here now. We got what we wished for. Maybe more than we wished for.

“We are blessed in this region to be a place where people want to live and stay,” Stevenson said.

But he said the days of density bonusing are numbered. The bylaw is being reviewed and “this is the last period of time for bonusing.”

It’s now long past time to rewrite that bylaw so that it responds to the concerns we have in 2022, like housing that’s affordable to people on low incomes, or a building that’s designed to be kind to the environment.
Reply
« Next Oldest | Next Newest »



Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: dtkvictim, Michaelkokokons, westwardloo, 3 Guest(s)

About Waterloo Region Connected

Launched in August 2014, Waterloo Region Connected is an online community that brings together all the things that make Waterloo Region great. Waterloo Region Connected provides user-driven content fueled by a lively discussion forum covering topics like urban development, transportation projects, heritage issues, businesses and other issues of interest to those in Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge and the four Townships - North Dumfries, Wellesley, Wilmot, and Woolwich.

              User Links