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Bonjour Welcome
#16
(04-11-2019, 09:48 AM)clasher Wrote: There's a lot of little differences in Québécois and Français but after doing immersion here and going to both France and Québec I didn't have a hard time getting by with the mix of lingo they taught us in immersion... people in France asked about my accent and most people understand or smiled when I'd say bicyclette instead of velo, char instead of voiture, like going to England and putting your stuff in the boot instead of the trunk. If someone from England came over here yammering on about our brutal colonial accent I'd tell 'em to f--- themselves.

Thank you!
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#17
Just to note that Franco Ontarians tend to have an accent that is distinguishable from the contemporary Quebec accent. Quebeckers can be a bit condescending about it, considering it old-fashioned and too influenced by English. There's a charming Franco Ontarian comic, Paidge Beaulieu, who is known for her (exagerated) Franco Ontarian accent:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4X9Gc4F27LA

At least I thought it was exagerated until recently, when I heard a Franco Ontarian woman on Ottawa cable TV speaking French with an accent that was indeed a bit reminiscent of Paidge Beaulieu!
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#18
(04-11-2019, 10:06 AM)panamaniac Wrote: Just to note that Franco Ontarians tend to have an accent that is distinguishable from the contemporary Quebec accent.  Quebeckers can be a bit condescending about it, considering it old-fashioned and too influenced by English.  There's a charming Franco Ontarian comic, Paidge Beaulieu, who is known for her (exagerated) Franco Ontarian accent:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4X9Gc4F27LA

At least I thought it was exagerated until recently, when I heard a Franco Ontarian woman on Ottawa cable TV speaking French with an accent that was indeed a bit reminiscent of Paidge Beaulieu!

Even with my limited French skills, Beaulieu is a riot!
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#19
I should clarify my earlier post - "Paidge Beaulieu" is a character created by comedian Katherine Levac, from St Bernardin in Eastern Ontario.
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#20
(04-11-2019, 10:06 AM)panamaniac Wrote: Just to note that Franco Ontarians tend to have an accent that is distinguishable from the contemporary Quebec accent.  Quebeckers can be a bit condescending about it, considering it old-fashioned and too influenced by English.

Went to a talk about that at UW a few years ago. The Franco Ontario accent has been shifting over the past few generations. People who are grandparent age sounded more to me like Quebecois (though not quite the same), whereas people who are high school age sounded more to me like... anglophones with an accent, although the speaker said they were fluent, just had a different accent.
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#21
(04-14-2019, 01:46 PM)plam Wrote:
(04-11-2019, 10:06 AM)panamaniac Wrote: Just to note that Franco Ontarians tend to have an accent that is distinguishable from the contemporary Quebec accent.  Quebeckers can be a bit condescending about it, considering it old-fashioned and too influenced by English.

Went to a talk about that at UW a few years ago. The Franco Ontario accent has been shifting over the past few generations. People who are grandparent age sounded more to me like Quebecois (though not quite the same), whereas people who are high school age sounded more to me like... anglophones with an accent, although the speaker said they were fluent, just had a different accent.

Yes, although both the Franco-Ontarian and the Quebecois accents have been shifting, just not in the same ways.  I think you would find the "grandparents" accent of the two groups to be much more similar to each other (especially if you would looking at rural "grandparents" on the Quebec side).
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#22
(04-14-2019, 05:40 PM)panamaniac Wrote:
(04-14-2019, 01:46 PM)plam Wrote: Went to a talk about that at UW a few years ago. The Franco Ontario accent has been shifting over the past few generations. People who are grandparent age sounded more to me like Quebecois (though not quite the same), whereas people who are high school age sounded more to me like... anglophones with an accent, although the speaker said they were fluent, just had a different accent.

Yes, although both the Franco-Ontarian and the Quebecois accents have been shifting, just not in the same ways.  I think you would find the "grandparents" accent of the two groups to be much more similar to each other (especially if you would looking at rural "grandparents" on the Quebec side).

Perhaps. It is also not uniform across Quebec. I had some trouble understanding grandparents in the Gaspe earlier this month. Montreal is usually ok.
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#23
I was pleasantly surprised to see a bit of French on this poster from ACCKWA.  I would like to see more of this in the Region of Waterloo.    

This event is today (May 1) so feel free to help out the local AIDS Committee by eating at one of the these restaurants. 

   
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