Guest Join UsHey Guest,
Welcome, Join our awesome community where you can discuss on various topics :-
Some point about your community
Some point about your community
Some point about your community
Some point about your community
Some point about your community
Some point about your community
Some point about your community
Much More.. or Create an Account


Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Cycling in Waterloo Region
#31
(08-27-2015, 05:59 PM)BuildingScout Wrote: The last link is about cyclists on the sidewalk which is presently illegal, and, as I pointed out before, the problem isn't cyclists on sidewalks. Europeans seem to manage this fine. The problem is cyclists racing on sidewalks as it were a street instead of a shared path, which brings us back to the original problem. It's the lack of shared path culture, not shared path.

You're right: the problem isn't cyclists on sidewalks, it's how they behave when they are there. Since it's currently illegal, you will generally get the least law-abiding and least courteous bike riders on the sidewalk. It's difficult with our current sidewalk infrastructure, which is by and large inadequate for people to walk on, let alone to accommodate bicycles. 1500 millimeters isn't enough for one use, nevermind both. That does not suggest that sufficiently wide shared paths can't work, but if they are the exception and not the norm, no culture will develop.
Reply
#32
(08-27-2015, 05:59 PM)BuildingScout Wrote: Just think about it, when there is an accident because someone is speeding on the highway no one calls for an end to highways. People call for an end to speeding. Yet every time there is an accident in a share path or sidewalk, its the fault of the path/sidewalk, not of the people involved.

[url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yiu1uLgwF1E][/url]

You can't end highways. 18 wheelers need highways. It's pretty hard to stock a grocery store or Walmart by bike courier.

And I disagree, people blame both the participants and the design of the egregious path, depending on the particular incident, path, and participants. Cyclists (and drivers) frequently blame other cyclists (or drivers) of poor behaviour on /r/Toronto.

Mixed use bike paths may require (at the least) more education/awareness and public consultation. In the worst case scenario, how could it hurt?

On another tangent, I wonder how ION will mitigate passenger disembarkment/cyclist collisions. It seems to happen at least weekly with the TTC. For most cyclists and transit users who use common sense, it shouldn't be an issue. Perhaps some idiot-proofing in advance would prove beneficial.
Reply
#33
(08-28-2015, 05:02 PM)numberguy Wrote: On another tangent, I wonder how ION will mitigate passenger disembarkment/cyclist collisions.   It seems to happen at least weekly with the TTC.   For most cyclists and transit users who use common sense, it shouldn't be an issue.   Perhaps some idiot-proofing in advance would prove beneficial.

Uh... well, in most cases, ION will be using a dedicated platform, that cyclists would have no reason to be on, unless they were getting on/off the train.
In a few other cases, the platform is part of the sidewalk, and I'm not particularly aware of an epidemic of people getting off buses getting run down by sidewalk cyclists, so I imagine it will be fine.

I'm guessing that the problem you're talking about with the TTC is regarding streetcars? ION will not require disembarking passengers to cross a lane of traffic.
Reply
#34
(08-28-2015, 05:15 PM)Markster Wrote:
(08-28-2015, 05:02 PM)numberguy Wrote: On another tangent, I wonder how ION will mitigate passenger disembarkment/cyclist collisions.   It seems to happen at least weekly with the TTC.   For most cyclists and transit users who use common sense, it shouldn't be an issue.   Perhaps some idiot-proofing in advance would prove beneficial.

Uh... well, in most cases, ION will be using a dedicated platform, that cyclists would have no reason to be on, unless they were getting on/off the train.
In a few other cases, the platform is part of the sidewalk, and I'm not particularly aware of an epidemic of people getting off buses getting run down by sidewalk cyclists, so I imagine it will be fine.

I see people step off GRT buses all the time without looking where they are going, and yes, almost getting run over or run into. This particularly happens a lot near the universities. But I don't think that ION will make this any more of an issue.
Reply
#35
(08-27-2015, 07:47 AM)zanate Wrote: Here's a map of the one-ways in Mary-Allen. They're designed to make it impossible to get from Union to Uptown except by King or Moore if you're going by car. They're also designed to make it challenging to get between any of the cross streets either, so the bulk of traffic goes along John and Allen using King or Moore to access.

The same rules apply to bikes, too, except that there's a lot of "north-south" bike traffic because of the access paths through to William. That includes me, most days. But if you're going/coming by way of Mount Hope cemetery (which connects much of the Mount Hope neighbourhood on the south) you're forced into cycling illegally or taking an unreasonable detour.

The spur trail helps somewhat but still draws people away from the cemetery area. I've found that it's a great trail to ride on (the parts that are paved that is) but that it forces me to deal with a part of Moore around Union that is both busy and hilly, and I'd rather just go down Herbert or Bowman into the cemetery which is a calm and beautiful place to bike through.

Recent provincial legislation should make it easier for municipalities to create and install contraflow bicycle lanes in exactly these situations.
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
Reply
#36
(08-29-2015, 11:08 AM)timc Wrote:
(08-28-2015, 05:15 PM)Markster Wrote: Uh... well, in most cases, ION will be using a dedicated platform, that cyclists would have no reason to be on, unless they were getting on/off the train.
In a few other cases, the platform is part of the sidewalk, and I'm not particularly aware of an epidemic of people getting off buses getting run down by sidewalk cyclists, so I imagine it will be fine.

I see people step off GRT buses all the time without looking where they are going, and yes, almost getting run over or run into. This particularly happens a lot near the universities. But I don't think that ION will make this any more of an issue.

I hope not.

I am looking at some ION stops and see a possibility of cyclists using the new LRT pathways as alternative route.   For example, the Block Line ION stop -- it just plain sucks to cycle in that area, with the high traffic volumes and lack of bike lanes.  

Depending on how the ION platform is connected to the sidewalks, cyclists COULD be tempted to use the pathway/platform area.   With that possibility comes the possibility of transit users and cyclists colliding (happens all too frequently with the TTC and GRT buses).

Hopefully the Region and GrandLinq can act proactively and integrate cycle paths/cycle friendly access while maintaining pedestrian safety, especially when disembarking. Bike access sucks in many ION stop locations. Hopefully the new stops will help the situation with proper design integration.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

About Waterloo Region Connected

Launched in August 2014, Waterloo Region Connected is an online community that brings together all the things that make Waterloo Region great. Waterloo Region Connected provides user-driven content fueled by a lively discussion forum covering topics like urban development, transportation projects, heritage issues, businesses and other issues of interest to those in Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge and the four Townships - North Dumfries, Wellesley, Wilmot, and Woolwich.

              User Links

              Advertise