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Highway 401 Widening - Highway 8 to Townline Road
Yeah, it is causing a bit more of a snarl than usual and causing backups in the left two lanes that would normally move quite well after Hespeler. Not as bad as I would have expected though.
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No, it's absolutely awful now, because the capacity loss is increased. We at least before had SOME hope that effective lane capacity could be maintained at 2x through the whole transition (provided everyone in the right lane immediately moves right, and then people in the centre lane have a brief moment to shuffle over).

Now, there is no crossover at all, so it is effectively down to 1 lane. Bad bad bad.

The new setup will be flawless because lanes 1 and 2 become the ramp itself. Lanes 3-5 continue straight through - utopia.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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The best temporary setup here would have been to make the right lane exit-only, middle lane a branch, and left lane straight through.

It would have reduced effective lane capacity straight through from 3 to 2, but effective lane capacity for 8 goes from 1 to 2. This is more balanced since about 50% of traffic exits here.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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I have a feeling MTO wants to avoid reducing lanes on the 401 as much as possible, but you're right it'd make more sense to reduce a lane westbound than eastbound (and currently they have it backwards).

One thing that is somewhat shocking about this project is that they're taking 5 years to widen 4 kms of highway.  Down in Chicago, they're in the process of widening (maybe they're already done?) about 40 kms of I-90 from 6 lanes to 10.  That highway is just as busy (maybe even slightly more) and they have similar climate as us.  And their timeline is about 2.5 years.  Some people have mentioned the replacement of speed river bridges as the reason, but in the I-90 project they're also replacing the bridge over Fox river, which seems to be about as wide as grand river (google street view here).  

And there's an obvious pattern here.. 4 years to add 2.5 km of express-collector in Mississauga back in 2010-2013 and another 4 years to add another 2.5 km of express collector currently under construction.
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(06-06-2017, 08:15 PM)p2ee Wrote: I have a feeling MTO wants to avoid reducing lanes on the 401 as much as possible, but you're right it'd make more sense to reduce a lane westbound than eastbound (and currently they have it backwards).

One thing that is somewhat shocking about this project is that they're taking 5 years to widen 4 kms of highway.  Down in Chicago, they're in the process of widening (maybe they're already done?) about 40 kms of I-90 from 6 lanes to 10.  That highway is just as busy (maybe even slightly more) and they have similar climate as us.  And their timeline is about 2.5 years.  Some people have mentioned the replacement of speed river bridges as the reason, but in the I-90 project they're also replacing the bridge over Fox river, which seems to be about as wide as grand river (google street view here).  

And there's an obvious pattern here.. 4 years to add 2.5 km of express-collector in Mississauga back in 2010-2013 and another 4 years to add another 2.5 km of express collector currently under construction.

I'm quite certain they weren't widening 40 km, that would be the entire length of the highway through the city, perhaps, 40 lane kms (10 kms total), even 10 kms would be quite impressive in 2.5 years, I question if that's the entire project.  The 5 year timeline here, includes rebuilding number of bridges before any apparent work starts.
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Do you think it's a money thing? Like, is it somehow cheaper to do this more slowly (fewer workers)?

I don't even remember - when is all of this widening scheduled to wrap up? And when does the "second phase" up to Franklin start? Really, this is going to be a mess until that's also complete.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(06-06-2017, 08:27 PM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(06-06-2017, 08:15 PM)p2ee Wrote: I have a feeling MTO wants to avoid reducing lanes on the 401 as much as possible, but you're right it'd make more sense to reduce a lane westbound than eastbound (and currently they have it backwards).

One thing that is somewhat shocking about this project is that they're taking 5 years to widen 4 kms of highway.  Down in Chicago, they're in the process of widening (maybe they're already done?) about 40 kms of I-90 from 6 lanes to 10.  That highway is just as busy (maybe even slightly more) and they have similar climate as us.  And their timeline is about 2.5 years.  Some people have mentioned the replacement of speed river bridges as the reason, but in the I-90 project they're also replacing the bridge over Fox river, which seems to be about as wide as grand river (google street view here).  

And there's an obvious pattern here.. 4 years to add 2.5 km of express-collector in Mississauga back in 2010-2013 and another 4 years to add another 2.5 km of express collector currently under construction.

I'm quite certain they weren't widening 40 km, that would be the entire length of the highway through the city, perhaps, 40 lane kms (10 kms total), even 10 kms would be quite impressive in 2.5 years, I question if that's the entire project.  The 5 year timeline here, includes rebuilding number of bridges before any apparent work starts.

It is in fact 40 km (25 miles) in the northwestern suburban area of Chicago, but it appears to be 8 lanes instead of 10 (my bad).  They're also reconfiguring several interchanges.  Source:
http://hoffmanestates.org/government/dev...nstruction

The replacement of the Fountain Street and Speedsville Rd bridges was done prior to when the construction began in 2015. 

(06-06-2017, 08:28 PM)Canard Wrote: Do you think it's a money thing?  Like, is it somehow cheaper to do this more slowly (fewer workers)?

I don't even remember - when is all of this widening scheduled to wrap up?  And when does the "second phase" up to Franklin start?  Really, this is going to be a mess until that's also complete.

It could be related to the cost, but I am not sure the cost scales when you take less time but have a lot of workers v/s you take more time but have less workers. 

401 to Hespeler construction is supposed to be done by summer of 2019.  The Hespeler to Townline widening is supposed to start in 2018 and be finished in "2021-2022".
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(06-06-2017, 08:15 PM)p2ee Wrote: I have a feeling MTO wants to avoid reducing lanes on the 401 as much as possible, but you're right it'd make more sense to reduce a lane westbound than eastbound (and currently they have it backwards).

One thing that is somewhat shocking about this project is that they're taking 5 years to widen 4 kms of highway.  Down in Chicago, they're in the process of widening (maybe they're already done?) about 40 kms of I-90 from 6 lanes to 10.  That highway is just as busy (maybe even slightly more) and they have similar climate as us.  And their timeline is about 2.5 years.  Some people have mentioned the replacement of speed river bridges as the reason, but in the I-90 project they're also replacing the bridge over Fox river, which seems to be about as wide as grand river (google street view here).  

And there's an obvious pattern here.. 4 years to add 2.5 km of express-collector in Mississauga back in 2010-2013 and another 4 years to add another 2.5 km of express collector currently under construction.

I'm not familiar with the I-90 Chicago widening, but did they fully replace the existing roadway too? For this 401 widening project, the existing highway carriageway was identified as requiring a full and complete replacement (grading, drainage, granular, superpave asphalt surface, structures - bridge replacement over river, etc.). What the MTO needs to do here is build the new carriageway, shift traffic over to the new alignment, and then fully remove and replace the existing carriageway, and then merge the two together for the final product. That is a complex undertaking while keeping a fully operational highway carrying well over 100,000 vehicles a day.

I can see where a simple 2 lane widening would be much quicker where a new 2 lanes would just be joined with the existing roadway.
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Thanks for the explanation; when you put it that way, it makes sense!
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(06-06-2017, 10:36 PM)The85 Wrote: I'm not familiar with the I-90 Chicago widening, but did they fully replace the existing roadway too? For this 401 widening project, the existing highway carriageway was identified as requiring a full and complete replacement (grading, drainage, granular, superpave asphalt surface, structures - bridge replacement over river, etc.). What the MTO needs to do here is build the new carriageway, shift traffic over to the new alignment, and then fully remove and replace the existing carriageway, and then merge the two together for the final product. That is a complex undertaking while keeping a fully operational highway carrying well over 100,000 vehicles a day.

I can see where a simple 2 lane widening would be much quicker where a new 2 lanes would just be joined with the existing roadway.

Oh this is a good point, especially cases where I've seen the "added" lanes half the time were just shoulders that people were now allowed to use.
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