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ION Phase 2 - Cambridge's Light Rail Transit
Someone my mother used to work with was looking for work and was told by the person on the phone "Oh, that job's in Cambridge; you won't want to work there" - not realizing she was from Cambridge.

In a job interview in Kitchener, the interviewers made fun of Cambridge to my face.

When the public board wanted to close a high school, Southwood and PHS were on the chopping block; no schools in Kitchener or Waterloo were threatened.

The region has been around since the 70s, but it took until about 15 years ago to get a bus from Cambridge to Kitchener; you had to walk from the top of Shantz Hill to Sportsworld.

We've been trying to get (CP at first but now) GO trains for forty years with little pressure put on CP from the region to make it happen; Kitchener asks once and they get two a day.

Can't imagine why people in Cambridge are a bit miffed.
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I bet the board chose those high schools for reasons of demographics and not just because they happen not to like Cambridge.

The bus from Cambridge to and from Kitchener 15 years ago coincides with when the Region started delivering transit. And residents of Kitchener would have had to make the same walk before that.

Is it true that Kitchener only asked once for Go train service?
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(01-24-2018, 02:05 PM)DHLawrence Wrote: When the public board wanted to close a high school, Southwood and PHS were on the chopping block; no schools in Kitchener or Waterloo were threatened.

The region has been around since the 70s, but it took until about 15 years ago to get a bus from Cambridge to Kitchener; you had to walk from the top of Shantz Hill to Sportsworld.

We've been trying to get (CP at first but now) GO trains for forty years with little pressure put on CP from the region to make it happen; Kitchener asks once and they get two a day.

Can't imagine why people in Cambridge are a bit miffed.

(1) This mis information is why I have little sympathy for the "woe-is-us" crowd.  In 2003 the WRDSB suggested closing Southwood and KCI (NOT Preston High).  Because of the complaining, both schools survived.  Kitchener residents fought due to the historical value of the building, and the fact a prime minister attended.  Cambridge residents argued that Kitchener was being a bully.  Lets look at the facts at the time.  The public board had 5 High Schools in Cambridge (Jacob Hespeler, Preston, Glenview, Galt, Southwood) vs. 5 High Schools in Kitchener (KCI, Eastwood, Grand River, Cameron Heights, Forest Heights)... a city more than twice the size.  Southwood has operated at less than capacity for a long time, and the decision was a no brainer. (I am Southwood alumni, so I do have skin in the game). 

(2) The region didn't run transit.  If Cambridge Transit could of run a bus to Kitchener, they should have.  Don't blame the Region for city gov't decisions.  [Provincial rules didn't allow them to cross boundries... its actually one of the reasons the REGION took over the CITY's buses is to provide better service to everyone!]

(3) K/W tech companies are the driving force that got GO trains after asking "once".  Maybe when Cambridge lands the next Google campus they will get GO trains.

I'm not saying Cambridge is mis-treated, they are WELL-treated.  They are our Quebec.  Per capita, the City of Cambridge gets more Regional services than other cities in the region, and they still complain.
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(01-24-2018, 02:43 PM)MidTowner Wrote: Is it true that Kitchener only asked once for Go train service?

GO service to Kitchener has been a long time in the making, and there were (and are) challenges with trains to Cambridge that don't apply to Kitchener. There's a reasonable-looking history at Transit Toronto:

Quote:In June 2006, the provincial government of Dalton McGuinty established Metrolinx, a crown agency whose task was to look at ways to expand public transportation infrastructure in the GTA. In the summer of 2007, based on Metrolinx's recommendations, the McGuinty government launched MoveOntario 2020, which proposed 52 transit expansion projects over the next thirteen years. Included in these proposals were two projects located within Waterloo Region outside the GTA: the Waterloo Regional LRT, and an extension of the Georgetown GO train to Kitchener to meet it.

There were already proposals to take GO Train service to Waterloo Region by extending the Milton line to Cambridge. However, while Metrolinx and GO Transit (which were later merged) were committed to expanding service on the Milton line, extending service past Milton proved costly. The line the Milton train operates on is a major freight route for Canadian Pacific and, west of Milton, the right-of-way narrows to a single track. Laying down additional track and adding stations gave the Cambridge extension higher start-up costs than service to Kitchener.
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(01-24-2018, 02:55 PM)Coke6pk Wrote: ...  They are our Quebec...

Well, that is an interesting way of putting it!  ;-)
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I laughed out loud at that.

I live in Kitchener, but work in Cambridge. Half our staff is from Cambridge and the rest from other parts of the Region. We joke back and forth about it all the time, in a familial kind of way.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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Further to that, the Metrolinx rationale for Kitchener line included the fact that we planned LRT, allowing people to get to/from the train without cars at both ends, putting LRT into both Waterloo's and Kitchener's historic cores. So far, Cambridge has bristled and even seemingly pushed to halt all LRT because of how it would go through their historic cores (nevermind that it's a bit ridiculous that we can't send LRT through cores whose age measures in decades, but all over the world we have them in cores whose age is measured in centuries).
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(01-24-2018, 03:42 PM)Canard Wrote: I laughed out loud at that.

I live in Kitchener, but work in Cambridge. Half our staff is from Cambridge and the rest from other parts of the Region. We joke back and forth about it all the time, in a familial kind of way.

I agree... I lived in Cambridge during my high school days, and my parents still reside there (In Preston on the future LRT line!).  I don't hate Cambridge, and I hope my message didn't come across that way.  My digs about Cambridge (and how I was lucky enough to escape, and how there should be checkpoints along the 401, and....) are made because you only roast the ones you love.  Heart

Coke
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Many a truth was said in jest. It's hardly a secret that many in K-W have a low opinion of Cambridge. It's pretty mild, but it has been that way as long as I can remember. W's contempt for K is rather more recent.
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(01-24-2018, 02:55 PM)Coke6pk Wrote: I'm not saying Cambridge is mis-treated, they are WELL-treated.  They are our Quebec.  Per capita, the City of Cambridge gets more Regional services than other cities in the region, and they still complain.

Sits back, grabs popcorn.
...K
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How things might have been different if Galt had successfully become the County seat in the 1850s rather than the upstart Berlin with its own ambitions...

Hopefully the LRT will stretch to Cambridge soon enough. Heck, if the LRT was a good incentive to stretch GO service here, then maybe that will nudge the ball on getting GO service there. Personally, I think that an LRT route from Guelph to Cambridge might be an easier stop gap rather than waiting for CP to budge on extending the GO service.
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"Stop the LRT Through Preston" still wants to send the route down the 401 instead.

http://www.570news.com/2018/02/13/group-...sit-route/
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Their philosophy is a non-starter; providing service to Preston is one of the key parts of the plan. No Preston, no train. (Of course, perhaps that is their ultimate goal...)
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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(02-13-2018, 11:22 AM)KevinL Wrote: Their philosophy is a non-starter; providing service to Preston is one of the key parts of the plan. No Preston, no train. (Of course, perhaps that is their ultimate goal...)

The idea of ION running along the 401 is appealing if for no other reason than to show motorists stalled in heavy traffic that there is a better way to travel. I get the same feeling when the VIA train to Montreal zooms past the heavy traffic east of Toronto and along highway 20 in Montreal.
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I like the idea; but I’m alwats a fan of transit on highway corridors (bart, cta, etc). It is awesome to watch trains while driving. Will never forget driving from Paris to Brussels and screaming the first time a TGV blew last like we were standing still (my friends promptly made me pull over so they could drive instead)

Everyone in Preston is bitching they don’t want it, so screw ‘em. Bypass altogether, everyone’s happy. It’ll shave tens of minutes off the travel time, too.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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