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ION Phase 2 - Cambridge's Light Rail Transit
(11-29-2017, 03:43 PM)DHLawrence Wrote: And what do they look like? Strip malls, industrial parks, and suburban sprawl. Galt, Preston, and Hespeler have urban cores and a built environment that could easily be enhanced with proper planning. Same with Streetsville and Port Credit. They haven't become suburban anonymity. You've contradicted yourself in your argument.

Those areas were once actual cores, but in being absorbed into Mississauga and not pushing to be a hub, they became an indistinguishable part of the landscape. Streetsville and Port Credit are somewhat alive, about the only ones which can say that, but as mentioned are known for their GO stop rather than what little development and intent exists there. The only people who know, are pointed to, or see value in those areas are the locals, and usually older ones at that. I would compare it to my own experience, as someone incredibly engaged in the region, I have visited Galt perhaps a half dozen times in over a dozen years, have strolled Preston once, and have never been to Hespeler. I'm not proud of it, but it's what the focus (or non-focus) residents have put on those areas has achieved.
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(11-30-2017, 09:01 AM)Viewfromthe42 Wrote: [quote pid='45571' dateline='1511988219']
Those areas were once actual cores, but in being absorbed into Mississauga and not pushing to be a hub, they became an indistinguishable part of the landscape. Streetsville and Port Credit are somewhat alive, about the only ones which can say that, but as mentioned are known for their GO stop rather than what little development and intent exists there. The only people who know, are pointed to, or see value in those areas are the locals, and usually older ones at that. I would compare it to my own experience, as someone incredibly engaged in the region, I have visited Galt perhaps a half dozen times in over a dozen years, have strolled Preston once, and have never been to Hespeler. I'm not proud of it, but it's what the focus (or non-focus) residents have put on those areas has achieved.

[/quote]

At the risk of veering off topic further, I have to disagree with that. Particularly Streetsville and Port Credit are vibrant and desirable places to live. I know young people who grew up in Streetsville who consider themselves natives of that neighbourhood first, and Mississauga second. And I know people (not old, not native to the region) who have moved to Clarkson and Port Credit who are very conscious of the value of those centres.
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Natives of Streetsville/Galt first, Mississauga/Cambridge/(RoW) second is indeed a part of the problem. The importance of an area, in my reference here, depends on its ability to be recognized, sought out, and seen positively by those who do not/have not lived there, for both leisure and business reasons. In Toronto, Danforth, Queen West, Liberty Village, these would be examples of areas which are known and sought out by outsiders (though with varying degrees of welcome to new developments of residential or employment in nature).
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I expect the same could be said of Port Credit for Mississauga, and to an extent Streetsville. Those are the two areas that would be at the top of my list.

It's all going to be in the marketing. To an extent that depends on developers, not on residents; residents make an area desirable, but developers tell you why that's a good idea. There's still room in all three downtowns for higher-density development without automatically going to high-rises. Maybe a couple here and there, but don't overdose; not many people are going to buy the "destroyed the town to save it" argument. Save wholescale high-rise building for Hespeler Road.
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Another public consultation session is coming up later this month, this time in Kitchener.
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At an odd spot for something that concerns points south and east of Fairway...
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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So it wasn't just me. Then again, aside from the Stanley Park area I'm not sure there *is* anywhere else that's close to the LRT route.
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Is there not a community centre on Morgan Avenue near Chicopee?
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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Why does it matter where the public consultation is? One of them was at the big A-Framed one on Wilson at the river one time, nowhere near the line.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(01-08-2018, 07:17 PM)KevinL Wrote: Is there not a community centre on Morgan Avenue near Chicopee?

There is....their is also one right by Lions arena (Country Hills Community Centre). So unless they're expect a lot of people showing up, it would have made more sense to have it at Centreville-Chicopee Community Centre, literally a short walk to the LRT.
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(01-08-2018, 08:58 PM)Canard Wrote: Why does it matter where the public consultation is?  One of them was at the big A-Framed one on Wilson at the river one time, nowhere near the line.

Kingsdale Community Centre (formerly Patrick Dougherty Arena)
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Article on possible GO Train stations in Cambridge and some LRT phase 2 talk.
In this article 'Karl Kiefer ' seems to have eaten some seriously sour grapes.

https://kitchener.ctvnews.ca/mobile/camb...-1.3770866
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I don't know if Karl sees how he comes off, but to some, that sounds a bit like "It feels like the region ignores Cambridge, and we in Cambridge would prefer to drive to Milton or Hamilton to catch a GO train, rather than Kitchener, in case you wondered how we felt about the region and its other cities."
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(01-24-2018, 09:55 AM)Viewfromthe42 Wrote: I don't know if Karl sees how he comes off, but to some, that sounds a bit like "It feels like the region ignores Cambridge, and we in Cambridge would prefer to drive to Milton or Hamilton to catch a GO train, rather than Kitchener, in case you wondered how we felt about the region and its other cities."

Agreed.

My response to his statement would be: "OK, and...?" Tongue
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(01-24-2018, 09:55 AM)Viewfromthe42 Wrote: I don't know if Karl sees how he comes off, but to some, that sounds a bit like "It feels like the region ignores Cambridge, and we in Cambridge would prefer to drive to Milton or Hamilton to catch a GO train, rather than Kitchener, in case you wondered how we felt about the region and its other cities."

In a previous life, I worked for the Region doing the Smoking By-Law.  The attitude above is EXACTLY what I dealt with in Cambridge.  They referred to us as the "Nazi's from Kitchener" and would constantly complain that Cambridge didn't want this by-law, Cambridge doesn't want Kitchener* to oversee anything, Kitchener* is always picking on Cambridge, etc.

(* I know Kitchener isn't the Regional Gov't, but no restaurant/bar owner in Cambridge knew that)

Coke
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