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Local Budgets
#11
(01-02-2017, 09:11 AM)ijmorlan Wrote: (why called the cross-product? That is a specific term from the mathematical topic of vector spaces and doesn’t involve the multiplication of regular numbers at all)

That seemed incongruous to me as well, but I think it might just simply be related to the fact that the product is supposed to characterize the crossing (the crossing-product in other words).
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#12
(01-02-2017, 09:11 AM)ijmorlan Wrote: I wonder what the history is that resulted in Margaret St. getting a grade separation but not Lancaster?

Having done a little investigation into it, it seems that Margaret got one because it's always had one.
Before the recently demolished bridge was built in the 50s, there had been a wooden bridge before that dated back to the 1910s at least. The geography around there naturally supported a bridge over the rail line, and with wooden construction being an option, it was relatively cheap.
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#13
(01-01-2017, 10:50 PM)Pheidippides Wrote: I built a little tool to show the impact of increasing train and vehicle traffic on the level crossings in Kitchener. Please note I assumed a near-term future state of all GO trains operating out the Shirley yard (or from the east) and servicing the future transit hub location. Please let me know if I have made any errors or bad assumptions.
Thanks, Pheippides!  The one discrepancy here is the difference in impact between train types, especially at Lancaster (and possibly St Leger as well): GO and VIA trails run straight through, closing the crossing for only a short time, whereas the freight trains tend to perform multiple back-and-forth movements, causing extended closures of the crossing.
Of course this really increases the need for a bridge/underpass at Lancaster ...
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#14
Thanks for the feedback.

I've added a tab where you can see the amount of delay in minutes for each crossing using variables such as number of shunting events, length of each shunting event, number of freight trains, number of VIA/GO trains, freight train crossing time, VIA/GO train crossing time, etc.:
   

As for the term cross-product that's just what Transport Canada calls it.
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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#15
Thanks! Very comprehensive now, I think.
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#16
I came across the following statements in the City of Kitchener capital budget and was very surprised by them (page 3):

Highlight #1 – The capital budget is balanced.
The capital budget is financially balanced, which means there is adequate funding for all projects included in the capital budget. This is a significant achievement, as it means the forecast is not just a wish-list of future projects, but an actual plan of what will be achieved in the future.


Highlight #2 – The capital budget reduces the City’s debt.
No additional new debt will be issued in 2018 over and above what’s previously been identified in the capital budget. Continuing to follow a disciplined approach to debt will see the City’s projected debt levels fall from $78M at the end of 2017 to $71M at the end of 2018, and a further decrease to $28M by 2027. 



Given where some municipalities are these days financially I think the people of Kitchener should be very pleased at how well positioned Kitchener is to essentially chart it's own destiny in the future and make the community what it wants to be rather than being subject to other limitations and whims. It should also help to make the region a more competitive place and liveable place not just locally, provincially, and nationally, but globally.
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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#17
Two thumbs up!
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#18
(11-26-2017, 10:51 PM)Pheidippides Wrote: Given where some municipalities are these days financially I think the people of Kitchener should be very pleased at how well positioned Kitchener is to essentially chart it's own destiny in the future and make the community what it wants to be rather than being subject to other limitations and whims. It should also help to make the region a more competitive place and liveable place not just locally, provincially, and nationally, but globally.

One would think so.
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#19
All that room for future borrowing! Wink
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#20
Part of my surprise was that City was not borrowing when rates are historically low and only going up from here (eventually, ..., maybe,..., no one knows)
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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