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Downtown outdoor spaces
#16
No pictures on hand, but Galt has three such spaces: the riverside square/patio on the west end of the Main St bridge near the architecture school, the Cambridge Sculpture Garden, and a small greenspace opposite Trinity Anglican Church, complete with medieval style labyrinth.
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#17
Sometimes, all you need is a couple of benches. These, at the corner of Benton and Church Sts, by St Matthew's Lutheran Church are actually fairly well used, especially by older folks catching a break after climbing up Cedar Hill.

[Image: jucv2b.jpg]
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#18
It surprises me that the parkette at King and Francis Sts does not seem to have a name.

[Image: 15nluhh.jpg]
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#19
Speaking of which, are there two less utilized green spaces than the brewer's green on King and William and the wind swept space across the street on King? What can it be done with that space to transform it into a vibrant urban space? A food kiosk and magazine stand? any ideas?
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#20
(01-14-2015, 12:06 AM)BuildingScout Wrote: Speaking of which, are there two less utilized green spaces than the brewer's green on King and William and the wind swept space across the street on King? What can it be done with that space to transform it into a vibrant urban space? A food kiosk and magazine stand? any ideas?

The Brewers Green is a nice urban park...aka "green space" (certainly underused) or perhaps better known as a "parquette" which is waiting for the building infill along King street to happen. Over the next five years  as the King North infill brings in more walking or people traffic to the downtown this will become a welcomed green space relief. 

Think of it as a NYC type park with a need for more benches and games tables. Starbucks and a game of outdoor chess?  ... chess anyone? 

What really would help the atmosphere is to get rid of the funeral home as soon as possible, it is "deadly" on the parquette atmosphere.
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#21
I don't understand the problem with the funeral home. It's very busy.....
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#22
These two parks were one of Waterloo's first public squares. Four lanes of traffic (soon to include an LRT track) and an elevation change don't make it conducive to much of anything these days.

On an related note, I just checked the space on Google Maps and noticed that there seems to be a 5-year span in the aerial photos. William between King and Park is torn up for LRT work, yet Engineering V is not yet complete in the next shot north.
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#23
(01-14-2015, 03:09 PM)nms Wrote: These two parks were one of Waterloo's first public squares.  Four lanes of traffic (soon to include an LRT track) and an elevation change don't make it conducive to much of anything these days.
Yeah, it seems it was an effective public square in the days before vehicle ownership was common. The kind of square that is really just a large area around the wagon track where you can easily set up a market or some other large festivity. When the square is full of people, the wagons will just have to go around, or slow down and go through.

Quote:On an related note, I just checked the space on Google Maps and noticed that there seems to be a 5-year span in the aerial photos.  William between King and Park is torn up for LRT work, yet Engineering V is not yet complete in the next shot north.
That was for sewer work that was done on William several years ago.
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#24
(09-20-2014, 09:27 PM)panamaniac Wrote: It surprises me that the parkette at King and Francis Sts does not seem to have a name.

[Image: 15nluhh.jpg]

According to Google Maps, its appears this parkette's name is Francis Green. I like it. Some signage should be added.

https://www.google.ca/maps/@43.4519245,-...,19z?hl=en
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#25
Francis Green. Well known figure from Kitchener history! Smile
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#26
It looks like these urban outdoor spaces are getting some love.

However, it seems almost universal now for development requests to seek and obtain exemption from greenspace dedication requirements. One example which comes to mind is the 144 Park-155 Caroline project in Waterloo. The equivalency trade-off there was an "amenity space" on the roof of the podium. However, in order to post pictures of that space in this thread, one will either have to trespass or buy or visit a unit in the development.

Should these public pockets make a comeback in intensification planning?
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#27
I think that the privatization of public/green space should be strongly discouraged. Soon, all that pedestrians will be left with are concrete wind tunnels (ahem Bauer Lofts alley) while the condo-owners enjoy the green space on the roof. Even a few benches and trees and set back opens up the space. Having public, open space encourages neighbourhood mixing and mingling. When I walk past a neighbour's front lawn, I get to enjoy the garden even if I don't get to walk in it.
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#28
(01-26-2015, 01:13 PM)nms Wrote: I think that the privatization of public/green space should be strongly discouraged.  Soon, all that pedestrians will be left with are concrete wind tunnels (ahem Bauer Lofts alley) while the condo-owners enjoy the green space on the roof.  Even a few benches and trees and set back opens up the space.  Having public, open space encourages neighbourhood mixing and mingling.  When I walk past a neighbour's front lawn, I get to enjoy the garden even if I don't get to walk in it.

Are those buildings paying parkland dedication fees? I don't think a development necessarily needs to have its individual piece of green space, just like it shouldn't need its own dedicated parking garage. But where the parking can be provided by the market, I think fees definitely should be levied on developments in order for the municipality to be able to create park space for the public. Just - that park space better be in the neighbourhood, rather than at the edge of town.
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#29
(01-14-2015, 12:06 AM)BuildingScout Wrote: Speaking of which, are there two less utilized green spaces than the brewer's green on King and William and the wind swept space across the street on King? What can it be done with that space to transform it into a vibrant urban space? A food kiosk and magazine stand? any ideas?

I've always thought a community oven and/or garden would bring a lot more people to the space across the street from the brewer's green.
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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#30
(01-26-2015, 09:58 PM)Pheidippides Wrote:
(01-14-2015, 12:06 AM)BuildingScout Wrote: Speaking of which, are there two less utilized green spaces than the brewer's green on King and William and the wind swept space across the street on King? What can it be done with that space to transform it into a vibrant urban space? A food kiosk and magazine stand? any ideas?

I've always thought a community oven and/or garden would bring a lot more people to the space across the street from the brewer's green.


Ironically, that's the sort of thing it used to be, as I recall. There were lovely gardens (maintained gratis by the Horticultural Society) bordered by grassy walking areas underneath lofty trees. The oasis was fondly regarded and well used by all.

For some occasion (maybe the Millennium?), the City of Waterloo decided to mess with perfection, and hired a consultant to assess the space. Has there ever been a consultant who has opined: "Things are good as they are; save my fee and do nothing"? This one was no exception. The present paving stone and concrete vista (the above-described "wind swept space") became the new vision. It may have been in case aliens decided to celebrate our Millennium with a visit - they would have a solid featureless expanse to home in on and set down their ship, and would thus choose Waterloo to make their appearance.

There was initial gushing by the enabling politicians and bureaucrats. But the aliens stayed away. The boulevard strollers left. Even the panhandlers and skateboarders declined to take over, finding the creation too bleak to occupy. No public figure now claims parentage.

So that's how we got Subtraction-by-Addition Plaza.
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