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10 Manitou | Tri-Cities MEC | U/C
#46
(05-28-2016, 09:21 AM)panamaniac Wrote:
(05-27-2016, 09:30 PM)BuildingScout Wrote: That place is unsalvageable. The faster it comes down, the better the city will be for it.


Not at all.  That building could be pretty easily expanded, renovated and reclad.  I look at it and see 8 Queen St N, redux. 

Although given the appearance of the parking garage, I really have no confidence in the owners to do anything helpful with the place.

Going off-topic, but Dream Realty needs to tear down the old mall and partner with/sell it off to a developer who would do something actually worthwhile with the site. The tenants in the old Sears portion are worth keeping, and the garage was just renovated and is worth keeping around, but the rest of the building is poorly laid-out and dead from the street.
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#47
(05-28-2016, 10:02 AM)dunkalunk Wrote:
(05-28-2016, 09:21 AM)panamaniac Wrote: Not at all.  That building could be pretty easily expanded, renovated and reclad.  I look at it and see 8 Queen St N, redux. 

Although given the appearance of the parking garage, I really have no confidence in the owners to do anything helpful with the place.

Going off-topic, but Dream Realty needs to tear down the old mall and partner with/sell it off to a developer who would do something actually worthwhile with the site. The tenants in the old Sears portion are worth keeping, and the garage was just renovated and is worth keeping around, but the rest of the building is poorly laid-out and dead from the street.




You mean the former Eatons, now home to the Record?   From the time it was converted into office space, I've had no problem with the former market entrance at Duke and Frederick.  I tend to see it as something separate from the old mall portion.   If it were to come down along with the mall portion, I would hardly shed a tear, but I don't think its very likely that we'll see either come down without at least one more attempt at remodelling.

Anyway, to keep things at least slightly connected to the subject of the thread, MEC in the Stantec building would seem an attractive idea, but I don't think the floor area is there to allow it.  I'm don't think I can think of anything Dowtown that would suit them, short of a new build.
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#48
(05-28-2016, 10:33 AM)panamaniac Wrote: Anyway, to keep things at least slightly connected to the subject of the thread, MEC in the Stantec building would seem an attractive idea, but I don't think the floor area is there to allow it.  I'm don't think I can think of anything Dowtown that would suit them, short of a new build.

Probably correct. Rent aside, Adventure Guide appeared to have a lot more sqfts in its new location as well. MEC is experimenting with some smaller sizes but they don't carry close to a full inventory. And it was a major part in the Quebec City store moving to the suburbs. Having said that, a location like GRR's is probably starting to be comparable to the MEC Burlington location.
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#49
(05-26-2016, 06:36 PM)plam Wrote:
(05-26-2016, 10:50 AM)panamaniac Wrote: Yes, I forgot about Adventure Guide.  The fantasy location for me would have been Downtown, which could support a destination retailer of that sort, imho, but I can understand why they'd not want to take the risk (or the expense).

I'm often disappointed with MEC for their store placements. In this case MEC will be a semi-hostile 20 minute walk from the LRT station, I think. It is still far better than the Adventure Guide placement. I tried to bike to The Boardwalk once and it was a terrible experience. I was bummed out a few years ago when Adventure Guide announced their move from their central location to the Boardwalk.

I understand why these gear stores like to put their stores in the suburbs: historically probably most purchases originate from the suburbs. But it is sort of against MEC's stated values.

Montreal has their first and second MEC store in the suburbs and a 3rd boutique which sells clothing only in a central location.

Quebec City's MEC store is moving to the suburbs from downtown.

As far as I know, the only central MEC stores are in Toronto and Calgary. I don't know where Vancouver's is.

Unless it has since closed, the MEC in Halifax was right downtown.

Coke
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#50
(05-28-2016, 09:59 AM)BuildingScout Wrote: Expansion simply means more of an ugly building. It's the wrong size, doesn't interact with the street, it occupies the entire block without having a public space, it has very few windows and if all of this wasn't enough it's in bad state of disrepair.

It was built with a public square at the corner of King & Frederick, and open stairs up to second floor patios overlooking the square and the streets. Essentially all the parts that are now green glass were originally open.

Edit: found a photo.
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#51
(05-30-2016, 05:12 PM)kps Wrote:
(05-28-2016, 09:59 AM)BuildingScout Wrote: Expansion simply means more of an ugly building. It's the wrong size, doesn't interact with the street, it occupies the entire block without having a public space, it has very few windows and if all of this wasn't enough it's in bad state of disrepair.

It was built with a public square at the corner of King & Frederick, and open stairs up to second floor patios overlooking the square and the streets. Essentially all the parts that are now green glass were originally open.

Edit: found a photo.

Thanks for the picture. I had only seen a photo when market square had an extra floor added. This picture really highlights the brick brutalism  (brickalism/briquelism?) I was talking about as well as how poorly designed that public square was.
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#52
Re the "brick brutalism" - that reflected the "warm and cozy" community input on what was originally intended to be a concrete exterior. The landscaped terrace on the roof was better than the street corner inset, but the combination of the two, an understandable effort to compensate for the loss of Cenotaph Square, was never a success, imho.
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#53
(05-30-2016, 06:54 PM)panamaniac Wrote: Re the "brick brutalism" - that reflected the "warm and cozy" community input on what was originally intended to be a concrete exterior. 

Are you sure about this? because Eaton's malls clear across the country were built in that period to the same general specifications.
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#54
(05-30-2016, 07:02 PM)BuildingScout Wrote:
(05-30-2016, 06:54 PM)panamaniac Wrote: Re the "brick brutalism" - that reflected the "warm and cozy" community input on what was originally intended to be a concrete exterior. 

Are you sure about this? because Eaton's malls clear across the country were built in that period to the same general specifications.



I'd have no idea how to track it down, but I recall reading an urban planning article about Market Square and its history and that is where I saw the information that the architect had originally proposed the concrete exterior.  If I recall correctly, it was either community pressure or City Council members, feeling the pressure, who insisted that warmer materials be used.  It would be interesting to compare the project to other Oxlea developments of the period.

EDIT:  I found the article and it is excellent!   http://numerocinqmagazine.com/2011/11/22...-storring/

(turns out it was Council and the developer, anticipating negative public reaction, who hired an artist/designer who came up with the idea of using brick to soften the structure)
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#55
The line about the "second floor oasis for pedestrians" is interesting; Jackson Square in Hamilton has the same thing.

The brick reminds me of Peterborough Square, another failed "Eaton Centre". It seems to have survived somewhat well, likely thanks to part of it being designed for offices from the beginning. The former Eatons, which appears to have never been connected to the rest of the mall, is now a Galaxy Cinemas.
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#56
I wonder if we should open a Market Square thread somewhere?  Perhaps in the  "Urban Design" forum, given the context in which it usually seems to be discussed.
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#57
My thinking for suggesting MEC could work in Market Square was due to access to the parking garage for those that drive there and all the transit options to get downtown. Plenty of people moving into and already living downtown can walk. Add some life to what is a pretty crummy building.

If MEC wanted to be out in the Fairway area near LRT I wish they found space at Fairway/Wilson instead.
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#58
Okay, further Market Square discussion can go in the new thread.
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#59
(05-31-2016, 07:31 AM)Chris Wrote: My thinking for suggesting MEC could work in Market Square was due to access to the parking garage for those that drive there and all the transit options to get downtown. Plenty of people moving into and already living downtown can walk. Add some life to what is a pretty crummy building.

If MEC wanted to be out in the Fairway area near LRT I wish they found space at Fairway/Wilson instead.

Although, I am not totally unhappy with the Farm Boy/Canadian Tire arrangement. Things are quickly changing there, and although still consumer-central, it isn't as ghastly as Hespeler Road. New retail going in across from Moores Clothing for Men, front facing, looks better than what we've been seeing.
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#60
(06-02-2016, 01:07 PM)CTGal1011 Wrote:
(05-31-2016, 07:31 AM)Chris Wrote: My thinking for suggesting MEC could work in Market Square was due to access to the parking garage for those that drive there and all the transit options to get downtown. Plenty of people moving into and already living downtown can walk. Add some life to what is a pretty crummy building.

If MEC wanted to be out in the Fairway area near LRT I wish they found space at Fairway/Wilson instead.

Although, I am not totally unhappy with the Farm Boy/Canadian Tire arrangement. Things are quickly changing there, and although still consumer-central, it isn't as ghastly as Hespeler Road.  New retail going in across from Moores Clothing for Men, front facing, looks better than what we've been seeing.

Yes, although still with parking between the building and the street, no?  I find that unfathomable at this point in Fairway Rd's development.
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