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Light Rail Vehicles - LRT, ICTS, Monorail, and more
#46
(01-25-2016, 10:45 PM)Canard Wrote: Japan has almost exclusively elevated urban systems (aside from underground metro), like Monorail and AGT. There's a very good reason why there are no Light Rail systems in Japan (although they have a few novelty tram lines that the Japanese think are kawaii.)

Well ... a lot of the elevated rail is conventional, what we could call heavy rail.  Most of JR East in the Tokyo area is commuter rail, but (mostly) elevated tracks and high capacity, and JR East carries the most passengers of any of the rail companies in Tokyo.  With 100+ rail lines in the Tokyo area, it's hard to make sweeping statements, though.

But the key reason for the lack of LRT in Japan (and especially in Tokyo), is that it simply doesn't have enough capacity.  But maybe that's what you meant?
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#47
Not really, I was just pointing out that in general, Japan is above everyone else when it comes to transport (they have to be), and they chose elevated AGT and elevated Monorail. So I think that says something. I wasn't really trying to bring their HSR and Commuter Rail into it (but yes, many of those lines are elevated, too).

AGT has another advantage - the guideway is particularly easy to manufacture, with much looser tolerances than steel rail or even monorail, which means that standardized construction industries can build the guideway.

[Image: Yurikamome%20Monorail%2004%2020140415%20...C04892.JPG]
Tokyo Waterfront New Transit Yurikamome is a typical Japanese AGT system. There are 11 such systems in Japan.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#48
Here's one of my favourite videos of the Yurikamome. It is such a beautiful system.



For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#49
(01-26-2016, 12:55 PM)Canard Wrote: Not really, I was just pointing out that in general, Japan is above everyone else when it comes to transport (they have to be), and they chose elevated AGT and elevated Monorail.  So I think that says something.  I wasn't really trying to bring their HSR and Commuter Rail into it (but yes, many of those lines are elevated, too).

Well, they have one monorail, and one AGT...
And dozens of third rail or pantograph heavy rail lines...

Tokyo doesn't build Light Rail as we know it because their densities are much higher, the land available is much lower, and they're willing to put up a lot more money. They need the capacity, there's no room on the road to put in a train, and they don't need the cost savings you get at-grade. Also, Japan isn't as adverse as we are to having level crossings with heavy rail.
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#50
Ottawa will be running a version of the Alstom Citadis, and Edmonton and Calgary both run Siemens trains.
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#51
(01-26-2016, 01:20 PM)Markster Wrote: Well, they have one monorail, and one AGT...

Sorry, nope, Japan has 11 AGT systems and half a dozen monorails (mostly Alweg-derived Hitachi heavy type, plus two Safege suspended monorails). (I will be riding 9 of the 11 AGT systems and most of the monorails in March.)
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#52
Yeah, I switched to the microcosm of Tokyo, but forgot to make that clear.

I just feel that you are overstating the market share in Japan of these alternatives. Yes they exist, but they are by no means standard. Most rapid transit expansion is still traditional rail, which often enough, is elevated.
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#53
Both Monorail and AGT systems are built to a standard. The monorail beams are a standard dimension and so are the AGT tracks. It is standardized by Japan.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#54
(01-26-2016, 02:22 PM)Canard Wrote: Both Monorail and AGT systems are built to a standard. The monorail beams are a standard dimension and so are the AGT tracks. It is standardized by Japan. When I get home I will show you the documents and dimensions. Please just stop, let's discuss and share interesting transportation alternatives.

You misinterpreted my use of "standard". I do not dispute that those systems are built to a set of specs unique to those systems. Don't worry, you don't need to prove it.

Absolutely! Discussion should probably try to avoid statements of which systems are "best" or "better", and focus on what makes them unique.

On the topic of Japanese AGTs,
The Omiya New Shuttle is kinda neat, in that they built the guideway as part of the elevated Shinkansen. The neighbourhood had objected to the huge new viaduct cutting through with no local service, but the area didn't need a full heavy rail line, and so this was chosen as a lower cost system. It shares concrete piers with the Shinkansen.



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#55
It also just got brand new trains (1, anyway) - check out the 2020 series. Most of the AGT systems were built in the 80's and a whole slew of them are getting new trains. I am not a fan of the new Yurikamome vehicles though. The original trains are my favourite.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#56
(01-26-2016, 01:52 PM)Canard Wrote:
(01-26-2016, 01:20 PM)Markster Wrote: Well, they have one monorail, and one AGT...

Sorry, nope, Japan has 11 AGT systems and half a dozen monorails (mostly Alweg-derived Hitachi heavy type, plus two Safege suspended monorails).  (I will be riding 9 of the 11 AGT systems and most of the monorails in March.)

Yes, but as an overall percentage, it's very small.  There are a total of 158 train lines in the Tokyo area and 70 in the Osaka area alone.

As an aside, almost every level rail crossing I have seen in Tokyo has had active gates and lights; unattended crossings are uncommon (but even at those, the traffic law requires everyone to stop before crossing).
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#57




I love Bombardier so much!! Heart
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#58




Linimo is the first urban maglev and operates in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. It was built for Expo 2005.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#59
Nice video! But I can see how people who hate our LRT would say "Why not use these structures for cars?, lol
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#60
In fun news, Bombardier stock is currently valued at $0.99. Granted, their 10-year high was barely $8, and the past year it's been a pretty steady decline from a few years hovering around $4.
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