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Light Rail Vehicles - LRT, ICTS, Monorail, and more
The Montreal trains also never see the light of day, so that has a huge impact on how hard of a life they live.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(03-13-2017, 01:09 PM)Canard Wrote: The Montreal trains also never see the light of day, so that has a huge impact on how hard of a life they live.

Indeed, the decision to completely enclose that system has had some very interesting results.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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Was it a conscious decision or consequence of going with rubber-tired trains?

One complaint about AZUR, which is common to the entire system, is a lack of air conditioning. With all the work they put into the station designs you'd think they would have done that ages ago.
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The choice to go with rubber-tire tech for the system means it can never go above ground, due to the weather.

They'll never have AC in Montreal because the stations don't have the capacity to remove the heat generated by the units on the trains. It would be a monumental effort to retrofit it all in now.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(03-13-2017, 06:05 PM)Canard Wrote: The choice to go with rubber-tire tech for the system means it can never go above ground, due to the weather.

They'll never have AC in Montreal because the stations don't have the capacity to remove the heat generated by the units on the trains.  It would be a monumental effort to retrofit it all in now.

How does CityVal handle this? It seems to be rubber on concrete but running mostly outside.
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(03-13-2017, 06:35 PM)ijmorlan Wrote: How does CityVal handle this? It seems to be rubber on concrete but running mostly outside.

CityVal (you're only mentioning it because I pointed out I was excited for its launch in Rennes in a couple of years, a few pages ago), and it's predecessor VAL, aren't built in places with snow.

As for the comment about it running "mostly outside" - there is no relationship between the guideway alignment/type of grade separation and the technology. It can be underground, elevated, or at-grade - your choice.

Morgantown's PRT is about the only [rubber-tired] AGT system I can think of that operates in an area with regular snow, and there, the entire guideway is heated (at great expense). The upshot is that it always works, even when the roads are completely impassible...
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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Which is a bonus for university students, who tend to be the majority users of transit outside major urban centres.
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(03-13-2017, 09:43 PM)DHLawrence Wrote: Which is a bonus for university students, who tend to be the majority users of transit outside major urban centres.

Out of curiosity, what is a bonus?

Also, are students actually the majority of users?  I suspect they probably form the largest (semi-)visible group, but I doubt university students actually represent >50% of riders on GRT.
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(03-13-2017, 09:04 PM)Canard Wrote:
(03-13-2017, 06:35 PM)ijmorlan Wrote: How does CityVal handle this? It seems to be rubber on concrete but running mostly outside.

CityVal (you're only mentioning it because I pointed out I was excited for its launch in Rennes in a couple of years, a few pages ago), and it's predecessor VAL, aren't built in places with snow.

As for the comment about it running "mostly outside" - there is no relationship between the guideway alignment/type of grade separation and the technology.  It can be underground, elevated, or at-grade - your choice.

Morgantown's PRT is about the only [rubber-tired] AGT system I can think of that operates in an area with regular snow, and there, the entire guideway is heated (at great expense). The upshot is that it always works, even when the roads are completely impassible...

I remembered your reference to it from before, and wondered about it when you mentioned that Montreal’s system needed to be covered for snow protection. So I think what I’m understanding is that CityVal cannot run in snowy conditions, which in most of Canada means it would have to be fully enclosed (or with heated guideway). Which I think pretty well means it is not suitable for Canada, because anywhere that full enclosure is cost-effective, it will be a high-traffic line that needs to be a subway, not a medium-capacity system like LRT, ICTS, or CityVal. At least, that is my immediate reaction — I welcome correction.

I don’t quite understand your statement that there is “no relationship”. It seems to me that CityVal requires grade separation — is there a way of building a level crossing? Of course it can be at-grade regardless, but as I understand it anything crossing it has to go above or below. More generally, it seems clear that some technologies are incompatible with level crossings, while others (e.g. 3rd rail) make level crossings strongly not preferred although still possible. Other technologies allow level crossings, but obviously every technology can be installed on a fully isolated right-of-way with no crossings.

Also I’m not really aware of the climate in France, at least not in detail, so I didn’t understand that Rennes is snow-free. Looking on Wikipedia, it says that it averages 9 snowy days a year, which to me suggests that it will probably melt almost immediately. So not entirely snow-free but pretty well ignorable.
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(03-13-2017, 09:53 PM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(03-13-2017, 09:43 PM)DHLawrence Wrote: Which is a bonus for university students, who tend to be the majority users of transit outside major urban centres.

Out of curiosity, what is a bonus?

Also, are students actually the majority of users?  I suspect they probably form the largest (semi-)visible group, but I doubt university students actually represent >50% of riders on GRT.

They were specifically discussing Morgantown and its reliable PRT (it's a university town).
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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