Welcome Guest!
In order to take advantage of all the great features that Waterloo Region Connected has to offer, including participating in the lively discussions below, you're going to have to register. The good news is that it'll take less than a minute and you can get started enjoying Waterloo Region's best online community right away.
or Create an Account




Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Schneiders Site Redevelopment
Not sure an underpass would be completely necessary - the rail line is relatively quiet, a level crossing would not be inconvenient.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
Reply


(02-03-2018, 11:27 AM)KevinL Wrote: Not sure an underpass would be completely necessary - the rail line is relatively quiet, a level crossing would not be inconvenient.

I suppose that's true, although the tracks run along a pretty substantial embankment at that spot, iirc.  Is the pedestrian underpass still there, or was it removed at some point?  
Although that underpass was on the wrong side of the creek to connect to a greenway over to Mill, istm.
Reply
https://www.schneiderredevelopment.com/


Auburn has a website for this development now. Including pictures of what will be demolished.
Reply
I always love looking at the development concept. I have to giggle that they show their development right to Stirling. Um, guys? My house is missing on your render. If you could please put it back, seeing as it isn't part of the Schneider lands, you don't own it, and it still exists, I'd sure appreciate it.

I have some friends who worked at Schneiders/Maple Leaf. One of the biggest issues they have with keeping any of the buildings is the sheer amount of chemicals that were used in the "chop shop" (old hog barns, then the slaughter houses) as they called it, the most prevalent being ammonia. It is what is going to be quite expensive to remedy as well. There were several ammonia leaks over the years and yes, there have been spills and the natural by-products from slaughterhouse-wastewater. Pollution abatement was not always a "thing" throughout the years at the plant.

Off the top of my head, CIP cleaners, alkaline and chlorine products, strong acids, did I mention ammonia, ammonia, ammonia?
Reply
(02-03-2018, 08:28 PM)CTGal1011 Wrote: I always love looking at the development concept.  I have to giggle that they show their development right to Stirling. Um, guys? My house is missing on your render. If you could please put it back, seeing as it isn't part of the Schneider lands, you don't own it, and it still exists, I'd sure appreciate it.

The renders are actually from the PARTS documents so it seems that the city has forgotten that your house exists! Wink
Reply
(02-03-2018, 08:52 PM)tomh009 Wrote:
(02-03-2018, 08:28 PM)CTGal1011 Wrote: I always love looking at the development concept.  I have to giggle that they show their development right to Stirling. Um, guys? My house is missing on your render. If you could please put it back, seeing as it isn't part of the Schneider lands, you don't own it, and it still exists, I'd sure appreciate it.

The renders are actually from the PARTS documents so it seems that the city has forgotten that your house exists! Wink

I’m confused. Where is this house? I agree the red outline on the map extends outside of the apparent boundaries of the Schneider’s site (north boundary Palmer Ave., it appears), but the extra area appears on Google Maps to be some sort of storage yard with no buildings on it, which it’s entirely believable they have also bought. The only building I see on Stirling (south side) between Courtland and the tracks is a commercial building closer to Courtland.
Reply
I hope the demolition involves explosions.



I like explosions.



Masala
Reply
(02-03-2018, 10:32 PM)ijmorlan Wrote: I’m confused. Where is this house? I agree the red outline on the map extends outside of the apparent boundaries of the Schneider’s site (north boundary Palmer Ave., it appears), but the extra area appears on Google Maps to be some sort of storage yard with no buildings on it, which it’s entirely believable they have also bought. The only building I see on Stirling (south side) between Courtland and the tracks is a commercial building closer to Courtland.

There aren't any houses on Stirling, but there are some on Courtland north of Palmer that seem to have disappeared.
Reply
(02-03-2018, 08:28 PM)CTGal1011 Wrote: I always love looking at the development concept.  I have to giggle that they show their development right to Stirling. Um, guys? My house is missing on your render. If you could please put it back, seeing as it isn't part of the Schneider lands, you don't own it, and it still exists, I'd sure appreciate it.

I have some friends who worked at Schneiders/Maple Leaf.  One of the biggest issues they have with keeping any of the buildings is the sheer amount of chemicals that were used in the "chop shop" (old hog barns, then the slaughter houses) as they called it, the most prevalent being ammonia.  It is what is going to be quite expensive to remedy as well.  There were several ammonia leaks over the years and yes, there have been spills and the natural by-products from slaughterhouse-wastewater. Pollution abatement was not always a "thing" throughout the years at the plant.

Off the top of my head, CIP cleaners, alkaline and chlorine products, strong acids, did I mention ammonia, ammonia, ammonia?

The same stories were told of the Kaufman Rubber building and it didn't seem to cause undue problems.
Reply
(02-03-2018, 10:56 PM)panamaniac Wrote: The same stories were told of the Kaufman Rubber building and it didn't seem to cause undue problems.

Regardless of the chemicals, the key problem in this case was with the structural integrity of the old factory buildings.
Reply
(02-03-2018, 08:28 PM)CTGal1011 Wrote: I always love looking at the development concept.  I have to giggle that they show their development right to Stirling. Um, guys? My house is missing on your render. If you could please put it back, seeing as it isn't part of the Schneider lands, you don't own it, and it still exists, I'd sure appreciate it.

I have some friends who worked at Schneiders/Maple Leaf.  One of the biggest issues they have with keeping any of the buildings is the sheer amount of chemicals that were used in the "chop shop" (old hog barns, then the slaughter houses) as they called it, the most prevalent being ammonia.  It is what is going to be quite expensive to remedy as well.  There were several ammonia leaks over the years and yes, there have been spills and the natural by-products from slaughterhouse-wastewater. Pollution abatement was not always a "thing" throughout the years at the plant.

Off the top of my head, CIP cleaners, alkaline and chlorine products, strong acids, did I mention ammonia, ammonia, ammonia?

Perhaps they should have build an Buckley's plant then...free ingredients (ammonia).
Reply
There is both ammonium and chlorine, so maybe salty liquorice would be a natural fit! Smile
Reply
I hope that they are able to salvage some of the red brick from the existing buildings and are able to incorporate them into the redevelopment.

My ideal vision for the site would have seen them utilize the processing plant along Courtland (with extensive renovations like the Breithaupt Block) , putting large exterior windows, and turned it into high tech office space. The renovated space would serve as a podium for residential towers above.
Reply
(02-04-2018, 12:19 AM)rangersfan Wrote: My ideal vision for the site would have seen them utilize the processing plant along Courtland (with extensive renovations like the Breithaupt Block) , putting large exterior windows, and turned it into high tech office space. The renovated space would serve as a podium for residential towers above.

By the sounds of it there were too many structural issues to make this feasible.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
Reply
Yes that is what it seems like. Surprising that the building is in such rough shape as it was operational not that long ago in the grand scheme of things.
Reply
« Next Oldest | Next Newest »



Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

About Waterloo Region Connected

Launched in August 2014, Waterloo Region Connected is an online community that brings together all the things that make Waterloo Region great. Waterloo Region Connected provides user-driven content fueled by a lively discussion forum covering topics like urban development, transportation projects, heritage issues, businesses and other issues of interest to those in Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge and the four Townships - North Dumfries, Wellesley, Wilmot, and Woolwich.

              User Links