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2015 Federal Election
#31
(10-11-2015, 02:59 PM)Coke6pk Wrote: I can assure you that these cards are used after the fact.  Stats for local office are collected from them, then they are sent to Stats Can who takes the data from them.  
So there are "masses of asses" transcribing info from these forms into a database? Huh

Quote:As well, as a legal signed document, they are used as physical evidence in cases of smuggling/criminal activity by the officer performing enforcement action.
I can certainly understand how a written declaration can be used against someone who's caught at the border in an act of smuggling. But how can these forms be used after the individual has been cleared to enter Canada?
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#32
(10-11-2015, 05:27 PM)Canard Wrote:
(10-11-2015, 02:07 PM)Osiris Wrote:

Thank you, I think that was the most helpful explanation against electronic voting, and I see what you're getting at now.

Who on this thread is advocating for electronic voting?
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#33
(10-11-2015, 10:15 PM)ookpik Wrote: Who on this thread is advocating for electronic voting?

I guess that would be me, I asked why we were still required to vote on paper and have stuff written down by hand.  I thought it would be a lot faster if it was all computerized, and several people replied with their answers.

I guess one thing I might argue against those who are against electronic voting, is "Do you store money in a bank?" "Do you use online banking?" Because that is pretty much the same thing, isn't it? It has to be secure.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#34
Quote:I guess one thing I might argue against those who are against electronic voting, is "Do you store money in a bank?"  "Do you use online banking?"  Because that is pretty much the same thing, isn't it?  It has to be secure.

As previously mentioned, banking is not secret from the bank. Imagine if the bank needed to know what all the transactions were but not who posted them. This is the fundamental tug-of-war that makes evoting so difficult a problem to solve.

Computer assistance can be really helpful, though. Maybe we need a hybrid approach where we keep the visual inspection of the ID by a human, but then confirm your attendance on an electronic roll, then give you a paper ballot? That could reduce the number of people behind the table and speed things up like those self-serve cashier tills.
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#35
Estonia has had Internet voting available since 2005.  While there are risks (as outlined in the video, although the video is focused on voting machines), there has so far been no evidence of fraud.  Roughly 30% of the voters are voting by Internet.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic...in_Estonia
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#36
(10-12-2015, 09:40 AM)tomh009 Wrote: Estonia has had Internet voting available since 2005.  While there are risks (as outlined in the video, although the video is focused on voting machines), there has so far been no evidence of fraud.  Roughly 30% of the voters are voting by Internet.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic...in_Estonia

It helps that they're the world leaders in cyber security after properly investing in the infrastructure for so long.
http://www.zdnet.com/article/the-poster-...er-attack/
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#37
Advance polls busy all weekend in Waterloo Region 
Quote:Local voters joined the estimated 1.6 million people who cast advance votes Friday and Saturday, according to Elections Canada. That's an estimated 34 per cent increase over the first two days of advance polling in the 2011 federal vote when about 1.2 million people cast ballots...

While the Kitchener Centre poll staff managed to keep the lines reasonable, there were reports of long waits at others. "Some were having an hour-long wait," LePage said.

Another possible factor that added to delays at advance polls:
Quote:With fewer advance poll locations, she said, voter lists are condensed so more people are voting in one location than on an election day.
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#38
(10-11-2015, 10:14 PM)ookpik Wrote:
(10-11-2015, 02:59 PM)Coke6pk Wrote: I can assure you that these cards are used after the fact.  Stats for local office are collected from them, then they are sent to Stats Can who takes the data from them.  
So there are "masses of asses" transcribing info from these forms into a database?  Huh

Quote:As well, as a legal signed document, they are used as physical evidence in cases of smuggling/criminal activity by the officer performing enforcement action.
I can certainly understand how a written declaration can be used against someone who's caught at the border in an act of smuggling. But how can these forms be used after the individual has been cleared to enter Canada?

(a) Masses of CPU's.Smile They are scanned and optically read.  I don't work for Stats Can, so I have no idea what information they gather.

(b) CBSA issues penalties for lots of different things.  For example, undeclared food.  That's not a criminal charge, but a financial penalty can be assessed.  The traveller can enter Canada, and the card would be held for an appeal of such a penalty.  Same goes for declaration amounts, currency seizure, etc.  Local ports use some statistical data from the card for mandatory reports.  The majority of travellers, your right, the card isn't kept beyond a few days... and that's just because they stuff the envelopes before they go to StatsCan.
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#39
(10-12-2015, 05:20 PM)Osiris Wrote:
(10-12-2015, 09:40 AM)tomh009 Wrote: Estonia has had Internet voting available since 2005.  While there are risks (as outlined in the video, although the video is focused on voting machines), there has so far been no evidence of fraud.  Roughly 30% of the voters are voting by Internet.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic...in_Estonia

It helps that they're the world leaders in cyber security after properly investing in the infrastructure for so long.
http://www.zdnet.com/article/the-poster-...er-attack/

Absolutely.  We could learn some things from them ...
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#40
The bit where the Wikipedia entry says that the system has been audited and was found to be easily corruptible worries me. Sorta like saying the only reason Estonia's elections _haven't_ been rigged is because no one's cared enough to try.

And even with Internet Voting, Estonia's still only getting 30% participation. A panacea for low voter turnout it isn't.

Perhaps we should pull an Australia and mandate voting? 93.21% turnout in 2010.

While we're there, maybe we can also ape their single-transferable vote and proportionally-elected Senate?
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