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Amalgamation
(01-18-2019, 09:29 AM)Spokes Wrote: Wait....if amalgamation happens and the name changes, do we need to change this site's name????

I think "Berlin Connected" has a great ring  Tongue
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(01-17-2019, 04:24 PM)ijmorlan Wrote:
(01-17-2019, 01:39 PM)BrianT Wrote:  
The airlines call Toronto Toronto on their signs in airports all over the world, even though it is called Pearson International Airport by us.

That just proves my point, because the actual name of the airport is either “Toronto Pearson” or “Toronto Pearson International Airport”:

https://www.torontopearson.com/

I’m not sure if the “International Airport” is part of the name or just a description.

The equivalent for our airport would be calling it just “Waterloo”, although obviously mentioning the ON and CA bits is necessary. So I would call it “Waterloo ON” within Canada and something that mentions Canada and probably also Ontario outside of Canada.

I can tell you that on quite a few occasions there were people waiting for family/friends to get off the plane, and we later found out they were Iowa by mistake.  Likely a reason why the airlines used Kitchener as a destination.  [Sunwing does the same in Dominican, as did AA in Chicago].

Airlines can call the airport whatever they want.... Globespan (flew into Hamilton from UK and other European destinations) referred to it as "Toronto - John C Munroe".  Many deplaned thinking they were in Toronto, and not an hour away.  The airline reps told them its a roughly 45 min taxi ride downtown... no different from Toronto-Pearson.

Coke
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Don’t mess with success, local mayors, regional chair tell provincial advisers
Quote:The current two-tier municipal government system is working well in Waterloo Region, the region's mayors and regional chair emphasized Thursday during meetings with provincial advisers on municipal reform.

The province announced in January that it was appointing Waterloo Region's former chair, Ken Seiling, and Michael Fenn, a former deputy minister and chief administrator of Hamilton-Wentworth Region, to review the governments of Waterloo Region and eight other regions and counties, with an eye to finding efficiencies and cutting costs.

The announcement sparked concern about whether the province might force local municipalities to merge into one supercity. The City of Cambridge, and the rural townships in particular, fear their identities may get erased if the province opts for amalgamation.

The advisers were in town Thursday to meet individually with each of the mayors of the region's three cities and four townships, as well as with regional Chair Karen Redman. They are to make recommendations to the province by this summer.

Any reforms should proceed only if they actually make life better for the residents and businesses of the region, Redman said. "I don't think you can start or end (only) with what the right number of politicians is for Waterloo Region."
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(02-09-2019, 02:21 PM)Spokes Wrote: Don’t mess with success, local mayors, regional chair tell provincial advisers

Quote:The current two-tier municipal government system is working well in Waterloo Region, the region's mayors and regional chair emphasized Thursday during meetings with provincial advisers on municipal reform.

The province announced in January that it was appointing Waterloo Region's former chair, Ken Seiling, and Michael Fenn, a former deputy minister and chief administrator of Hamilton-Wentworth Region, to review the governments of Waterloo Region and eight other regions and counties, with an eye to finding efficiencies and cutting costs.

The announcement sparked concern about whether the province might force local municipalities to merge into one supercity. The City of Cambridge, and the rural townships in particular, fear their identities may get erased if the province opts for amalgamation.

The advisers were in town Thursday to meet individually with each of the mayors of the region's three cities and four townships, as well as with regional Chair Karen Redman. They are to make recommendations to the province by this summer.

Any reforms should proceed only if they actually make life better for the residents and businesses of the region, Redman said. "I don't think you can start or end (only) with what the right number of politicians is for Waterloo Region."

Good....we really don't need amalgamation. Hopefully the Ford Government will listen to this. I haven't met anyone that wants this. Only plus to this is signage on the 401 saying "Name of City....Population 565,000"
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We don't need amalgamation, per se, but there are definitely people who want it. I'm ambivalent. At some point, it will likely happen, and in some ways I think the integration will be more difficult the longer the wait. Specifically I think it will be an increasing issue if Cambridge's growth lags and Kitchener's and Waterloo's, and Kitchener (in particular) starts providing services that seem more like "big city" ones.

Similarly, I think amalgamation might be pretty appealing to some newcomers to suburban areas of a few of the townships. I can definitely imagine a time in the future where a majority of residents of Breslau, for example, might not really share the "rural culture" that's used by the townships in opposition to amalgamation.
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(02-10-2019, 02:08 PM)MidTowner Wrote: We don't need amalgamation, per se, but there are definitely people who want it. I'm ambivalent. At some point, it will likely happen, and in some ways I think the integration will be more difficult the longer the wait. Specifically I think it will be an increasing issue if Cambridge's growth lags and Kitchener's and Waterloo's, and Kitchener (in particular) starts providing services that seem more like "big city" ones.

Similarly, I think amalgamation might be pretty appealing to some newcomers to suburban areas of a few of the townships. I can definitely imagine a time in the future where a majority of residents of Breslau, for example, might not really share the "rural culture" that's used by the townships in opposition to amalgamation.

They might not share that "rural culture"...I think that's already the case...but anyone know what the tax rates are?  I'm guessing much lower...but I don't know for sure...  If so, I'm sure they'd miss that.
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(02-10-2019, 02:26 PM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(02-10-2019, 02:08 PM)MidTowner Wrote: We don't need amalgamation, per se, but there are definitely people who want it. I'm ambivalent. At some point, it will likely happen, and in some ways I think the integration will be more difficult the longer the wait. Specifically I think it will be an increasing issue if Cambridge's growth lags and Kitchener's and Waterloo's, and Kitchener (in particular) starts providing services that seem more like "big city" ones.

Similarly, I think amalgamation might be pretty appealing to some newcomers to suburban areas of a few of the townships. I can definitely imagine a time in the future where a majority of residents of Breslau, for example, might not really share the "rural culture" that's used by the townships in opposition to amalgamation.

They might not share that "rural culture"...I think that's already the case...but anyone know what the tax rates are?  I'm guessing much lower...but I don't know for sure...  If so, I'm sure they'd miss that.

The total property tax in Kitchener is about 20% higher.
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