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Grocery Stores
(02-06-2018, 08:13 AM)MidTowner Wrote: ...others I know tell me about when the LCBO issued individual permits, individuals’ purchases were recorded by clerks, and consumers could be restricted explicitly from buying alcohol in any quantity.

Indeed, in the olden days up to the 1960s there was no stock on open display, you had to fill out a ticket with your desired purchases and present that at a window, and (if approved) your order would be passed along wrapped in paper bags.

Permits are still required for notably large purchases - my brother and I were in charge of getting the alcohol supply for his wedding reception, and due to the volume of the purchase he had had to get an event permit for that ahead of time.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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(02-06-2018, 11:39 AM)KevinL Wrote:
(02-06-2018, 08:13 AM)MidTowner Wrote: ...others I know tell me about when the LCBO issued individual permits, individuals’ purchases were recorded by clerks, and consumers could be restricted explicitly from buying alcohol in any quantity.

Indeed, in the olden days up to the 1960s there was no stock on open display, you had to fill out a ticket with your desired purchases and present that at a window, and (if approved) your order would be passed along wrapped in paper bags.

Permits are still required for notably large purchases - my brother and I were in charge of getting the alcohol supply for his wedding reception, and due to the volume of the purchase he had had to get an event permit for that ahead of time.

There was still an LCBO like this in Toronto in the mid 80's I remember going to. While I had heard they were all like this in the past, this is the only one I had ever seen. Very strange.
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(02-06-2018, 11:10 AM)tomh009 Wrote:
(02-05-2018, 11:15 PM)Elmira Guy Wrote: But tobacco is about the same price it was 25 or so years ago. I don't know if you're old enough to remember (no offense intended), but tobacco prices were brought back down quite severely after black market tobacco really boomed. So much so that the mayor of one of the eastern Ontario border towns (I cannot remember which town) went into hiding for several days due to criminal groups fighting over smuggling tobacco back into Canada.
I ran a variety store at the time, and cigarettes went down over $3/pack, and the price for a pack today is perhaps only 10-15% more than they were in the early 90's.

It seems that cigarettes cost around $10/pack in Ontario (I had to check as I don't smoke):
https://nsra-adnf.ca/wp-content/uploads/..._table.pdf

And $63 of that is taxes -- a far high proportion than for gasoline, for example.  We're not the highest on the global scale but still near the top:
https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/co...?itemId=17

That's on the very low end of the price scale. Most cigarettes (packs of 25 anyway, which are what most people buy) are between $12-13/pack.
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(02-06-2018, 11:46 AM)Elmira Guy Wrote:
(02-06-2018, 11:39 AM)KevinL Wrote: Indeed, in the olden days up to the 1960s there was no stock on open display, you had to fill out a ticket with your desired purchases and present that at a window, and (if approved) your order would be passed along wrapped in paper bags.

Permits are still required for notably large purchases - my brother and I were in charge of getting the alcohol supply for his wedding reception, and due to the volume of the purchase he had had to get an event permit for that ahead of time.

There was still an LCBO like this in Toronto in the mid 80's I remember going to. While I had heard they were all like this in the past, this is the only one I had ever seen. Very strange.

I would like to assume that buying marijuana will be simpler.
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(02-06-2018, 11:46 AM)Elmira Guy Wrote:
(02-06-2018, 11:39 AM)KevinL Wrote: Indeed, in the olden days up to the 1960s there was no stock on open display, you had to fill out a ticket with your desired purchases and present that at a window, and (if approved) your order would be passed along wrapped in paper bags.

Permits are still required for notably large purchases - my brother and I were in charge of getting the alcohol supply for his wedding reception, and due to the volume of the purchase he had had to get an event permit for that ahead of time.

There was still an LCBO like this in Toronto in the mid 80's I remember going to. While I had heard they were all like this in the past, this is the only one I had ever seen. Very strange.

I remember that. I wasn’t buying, but I remember the board with the products listed.

Anybody remember Consumer’s Distributing? Same model, but for stuff you would probably just get at WalMart now.
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(02-06-2018, 12:55 PM)ijmorlan Wrote: Anybody remember Consumer’s Distributing? Same model, but for stuff you would probably just get at WalMart now.

I do. And I think they had a competitor, too ... although I can't remember the name of that company.
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I sent a lot of time at the Consumer's Distributing in Uptown Waterloo, just flipping through the pages of the catalogue. Buying stuff there was weird and exciting.
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I also remember Consumer's Distributing in Waterloo. If memory serves, it was where Abe Erb and Famoso Pizza are now. It was a Pier One and then a children's clothing store (Bonnie Toggs) after CD closed.
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An in Kitchener, maybe where Bulk Barn is now, on Weber St E.

The competitor I was trying to think of was Shop-Rite. Same business model, very much a 70s logo!

[Image: Shoprite_Canada.jpg]
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(02-06-2018, 02:23 PM)Elmira Guy Wrote: I also remember Consumer's Distributing in Waterloo. If memory serves, it was where Abe Erb and Famoso Pizza are now. It was a Pier One and then a children's clothing store (Bonnie Toggs) after CD closed.

That's correct. I'm not entirely certain if it's the same building with a very different facade, or if the original building was torn down. I wasn't living in town at the time, but I vaguely recall a big change in the mid or late 90s, around the time Rude Native moved in to where Famoso is now.
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Hmm. I actually cannot remember either if that's a new building, or a heavily modified one.

Anyone?

Sorry we've strayed a bit from the original subject of this thread.
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I think it is a new building, possibly built on the same foundation.
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(02-06-2018, 02:44 PM)robdrimmie Wrote:
(02-06-2018, 02:23 PM)Elmira Guy Wrote: I also remember Consumer's Distributing in Waterloo. If memory serves, it was where Abe Erb and Famoso Pizza are now. It was a Pier One and then a children's clothing store (Bonnie Toggs) after CD closed.

That's correct. I'm not entirely certain if it's the same building with a very different facade, or if the original building was torn down. I wasn't living in town at the time, but I vaguely recall a big change in the mid or late 90s, around the time Rude Native moved in to where Famoso is now.

My recollection is that the Pier One was demolished and the Rude Native was built new.

However I might be missing a step between those two, and I also can’t say whether the foundation might have been re-used as suggested by timc. However, my sense is that it is probably a completely new build. Old buildings of that size didn’t always have much in the way of a foundation.
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(02-06-2018, 12:55 PM)ijmorlan Wrote:
(02-06-2018, 11:46 AM)Elmira Guy Wrote: There was still an LCBO like this in Toronto in the mid 80's I remember going to. While I had heard they were all like this in the past, this is the only one I had ever seen. Very strange.

I remember that. I wasn’t buying, but I remember the board with the products listed.

Anybody remember Consumer’s Distributing? Same model, but for stuff you would probably just get at WalMart now.

Good ol' Consumers Distributing.  I too loved that place!

As for the LCBO, I think there was one in Hespeler that still did the ticket thing when I first turned legal drinking age (and that was well AFTER the 60's!)

Coke
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Looks like the Grocery Store going in at Fischer Hallman and Bleams will be a metro...


http://oneproperties.com/wp-content/uplo...ow-Res.pdf
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