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Midtown Lofts | ?m | 6 fl | U/C
#46
(07-21-2015, 09:34 AM)tomh009 Wrote:
(07-21-2015, 07:56 AM)MidTowner Wrote: Here's hoping. It will be very sad to see a net loss of retail and commercial space, but nice to see development in this area: it is primed for it.

The amount (and quality) of retail space lost is really not so much.  As long as this is the exception rather than the rule, it should be fine, I think.

More residential will bring new retail anyway. We need to build up the population downtown as a first step, so I am all for this - mixed-use or standalone residential.
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#47
Is it confirmed that this project will have no retail?
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#48
I think it's just everyone's assumption at this point.  This is what Decade Homes says on their web site, no mention of retail:


Quote:The Midtown Lofts will rise 6 storeys on King Street at the midpoint between everything that’s new and exciting in Downtown Kitchener, the Innovation District and Uptown Waterloo. Featuring studio, one bedroom, one bedroom + den and two bedroom suites, this trendy mid-rise condominium will be conveniently located right on the new light-rail transit route, just up the street from Google’s new Canadian development HQ.

Sales centre opening in September. Stay tuned for our pre-launch event!
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#49
If I recall correctly, there was initially talk of providing for commercial space, and it faded away. I agree that it's probably not too serious, so long as other nearby developments don't follow suit.
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#50
New render from the website (not sure the whole website was updated too, can't remember the old one)

[Image: hero_slide.jpg]

http://www.themidtownlofts.com

edit: maybe the ground level units are designed to be convertible to commercial if needed?
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#51
Another render I hadn't seen (note that it's now 6 floors instead of 7):

[Image: 2015_08_28_10_41_55_decade_group_midtown..._07_31.jpg]

one more:

[Image: 2015_08_28_10_41_53_terrace_midtown-editedjuly2015.jpg]

a couple more interior shots at https://www.buzzbuzzhome.com/midtown-lofts
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#52
(09-02-2015, 08:18 AM)insider Wrote: edit: maybe the ground level units are designed to be convertible to commercial if needed?

Is there a reason you think they could be? I can't see any mention of that on the site, but if it's a possibility it would be a good one.

I generally like the look of the renders.
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#53
I don't understand 1) why they think ground-floor street-facing units in a location like this are attractive, and 2) why they aren't just doing commercial.

As always, I suspect parking requirements in the zoning might have something to do with poor choices like this one.
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#54
Very surprised that it is not going to be mixed use from the start. Too bad that it has been reduced in height but the renders look nice.
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#55
Sorry, is this going to be rentals or condos? The ground floor units will require a really special clientel. That view will not be very nice, and the hoards of students at KCI will not be attracting occupants in my opinion. 

Perhaps the reason for no ground floor retail was intentional to help move along the students. 

I would also like to see this building be taller... 

Not optimistic about this one.
_____________________________________
I used to be the mayor of sim city. I know what I am talking about.
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#56
(09-02-2015, 06:09 PM)mpd618 Wrote: I don't understand 1) why they think ground-floor street-facing units in a location like this are attractive, and 2) why they aren't just doing commercial.

As always, I suspect parking requirements in the zoning might have something to do with poor choices like this one.

Let me make this more concrete. As an extremely rough guess, there's 7 or so 800-square foot residential units on the ground floor. That's a total of 5600 square feet, or just over 500 square metres. As residential units in a multi-residential building in a Mixed-Use zone, they require 1 parking spot per unit for a total of 7. For retail use, Kitchener requires 1 parking space per 20 square metres, or a total of 25 spots if that space were retail instead. (That doesn't include restaurant use, which is at 1 per 7.5 square metres.)

It's possible that another 18 spots would have required them to scale back the building or add another level of parking.
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#57
I think six or seven floors is pretty well ideal along this stretch at this point. But I agree that it's a head-scratcher how buyers will be attracted to ground-floor apartments here, and retail would make a lot of sense. I still hold out a lot of hope for some sort of commercial aspect to the development, but I think the location is a great one and I expect it will get the sales needed to proceed.
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#58
(09-02-2015, 08:22 PM)mpd618 Wrote:
(09-02-2015, 06:09 PM)mpd618 Wrote: I don't understand 1) why they think ground-floor street-facing units in a location like this are attractive, and 2) why they aren't just doing commercial.

As always, I suspect parking requirements in the zoning might have something to do with poor choices like this one.

Let me make this more concrete. As an extremely rough guess, there's 7 or so 800-square foot residential units on the ground floor. That's a total of 5600 square feet, or just over 500 square metres. As residential units in a multi-residential building in a Mixed-Use zone, they require 1 parking spot per unit for a total of 7. For retail use, Kitchener requires 1 parking space per 20 square metres, or a total of 25 spots if that space were retail instead. (That doesn't include restaurant use, which is at 1 per 7.5 square metres.)

It's possible that another 18 spots would have required them to scale back the building or add another level of parking.

Variances can and have been requested for parking requirements. But you're right that these parking requirements are regressive and not necessary along King Street.
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#59
(09-02-2015, 08:38 PM)MidTowner Wrote: Variances can and have been requested for parking requirements. But you're right that these parking requirements are regressive and not necessary along King Street.

Requesting and fighting for a variance also costs time and money, and council isn't necessarily receptive. Maybe they'll ask for the variance later, or hope that the parking requirements will be brought out of the 1960s.
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#60
(09-02-2015, 08:22 PM)mpd618 Wrote:
(09-02-2015, 06:09 PM)mpd618 Wrote: I don't understand 1) why they think ground-floor street-facing units in a location like this are attractive, and 2) why they aren't just doing commercial.

As always, I suspect parking requirements in the zoning might have something to do with poor choices like this one.

Let me make this more concrete. As an extremely rough guess, there's 7 or so 800-square foot residential units on the ground floor. That's a total of 5600 square feet, or just over 500 square metres. As residential units in a multi-residential building in a Mixed-Use zone, they require 1 parking spot per unit for a total of 7. For retail use, Kitchener requires 1 parking space per 20 square metres, or a total of 25 spots if that space were retail instead. (That doesn't include restaurant use, which is at 1 per 7.5 square metres.)

It's possible that another 18 spots would have required them to scale back the building or add another level of parking.

If they use the ground floor for smaller, low-cost units (where the lack of a view is not a major issue), the parking requirements are even less.  10 units of 50 m^2 (560 sqft) would require only two parking spaces.

Dowtown retail space only requires one space per 95 m^2, so six spaces in this particular case.
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