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Station Park (née SIXO) | 28 + 20? + 12? + ? fl | Proposed
Oh ouch @ Ottawa! Been seeing the Ottawa name pop up on top 10 places for real estate investment in the past while. I don't know anything about the city and properties there though. Also heard whispers that London Ontario will be the next big investment place and another friend telling me Nova Scotia (Halifax?) !
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(01-06-2019, 01:56 AM)Momo26 Wrote: Oh ouch @ Ottawa! Been seeing the Ottawa name pop up on top 10 places for real estate investment in the past while. I don't know anything about the city and properties there though. Also heard whispers that London Ontario will be the next big investment place and another friend telling me Nova Scotia (Halifax?) !

Wouldn't be surprised for Halifax. London, that's a wild card. They're close to nothing, basically.

Halifax has the advantage of being on the sea. Close enough to major centre's in the north-eastern USA, and from this token, no real competition from other cities. London is further away from major centres than Windsor, Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo, and of course, the GTA and Niagara Region.

Also negative about London; no real highways through the city, and not much for public transportation. Not that Halifax is much better, but they're by the sea, by the beautiful sea.
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When do we expect more details about "Station Park" to be released? Specifically, what it will look like, and how tall?
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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The developer stated that they are planning to release project details this spring.
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(01-05-2019, 01:09 PM)panamaniac Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 12:02 PM)Momo26 Wrote: I know there has been a recent surge in development, unprecedented in the history of DTK, but as I was entering downtown Toronto last night, marvelling at yet 5+ new high rise condos going up (40+ stories) that weren't there the last time I strolled through, I thought man we are slow in making decisions in KW aren't we ha.

Compared to Ottawa, I find that K-W moves at the speed of light.  Think decades, rather than years.

So so so true.  Ottawa is very slow.

I would guess on a per capita scale we move fairly quickly
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Was this site considered for downtown development fee exemptions?
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When you say downtown development fee exemptions, does this mean some government break given to the developer that they would normally have to pay in a suburb? Is it common in other big cities, a la downtown Toronto etc?
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(01-07-2019, 10:26 AM)Spokes Wrote: Was this site considered for downtown development fee exemptions?

No, iirc.
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(01-07-2019, 10:49 AM)Momo26 Wrote: When you say downtown development fee exemptions, does this mean some government break given to the developer that they would normally have to pay in a suburb? Is it common in other big cities, a la downtown Toronto etc?

Any time a development is started, there are fees the developer has to pay to the city.  For a long time Kitchener waived those development fees in Downtown to encourage development projects but that is stopping soon.

Did I get it right?
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(01-07-2019, 11:19 AM)Spokes Wrote:
(01-07-2019, 10:49 AM)Momo26 Wrote: When you say downtown development fee exemptions, does this mean some government break given to the developer that they would normally have to pay in a suburb? Is it common in other big cities, a la downtown Toronto etc?

Any time a development is started, there are fees the developer has to pay to the city.  For a long time Kitchener waived those development fees in Downtown to encourage development projects but that is stopping soon.

Did I get it right?

Yup. The fees in theory should pay for the shared infrastructure that the development will rely on, i.e., we (the city) payed to build sewers to take away waste water and storm water, private developers should have to pay for the right to benefit from that.

In practice, I'm not sure how closely tied these fees are to the value or cost of the service they're paying for.  Specifically, large developments in DTK *should* pay less than suburban sprawl developments because they make more efficient use of this infrastructure, but I have no idea if they do.
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(01-07-2019, 11:29 AM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(01-07-2019, 11:19 AM)Spokes Wrote: Any time a development is started, there are fees the developer has to pay to the city.  For a long time Kitchener waived those development fees in Downtown to encourage development projects but that is stopping soon.

Did I get it right?

Yup. The fees in theory should pay for the shared infrastructure that the development will rely on, i.e., we (the city) payed to build sewers to take away waste water and storm water, private developers should have to pay for the right to benefit from that.

In practice, I'm not sure how closely tied these fees are to the value or cost of the service they're paying for.  Specifically, large developments in DTK *should* pay less than suburban sprawl developments because they make more efficient use of this infrastructure, but I have no idea if they do.

Yes they do, at least to some extent, although I don't know the extent to which they do or don't reflect actual cost of service:

https://www.kitchener.ca/en/building-and...nt-Charges
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(01-07-2019, 11:41 AM)panamaniac Wrote:
(01-07-2019, 11:29 AM)danbrotherston Wrote: Yup. The fees in theory should pay for the shared infrastructure that the development will rely on, i.e., we (the city) payed to build sewers to take away waste water and storm water, private developers should have to pay for the right to benefit from that.

In practice, I'm not sure how closely tied these fees are to the value or cost of the service they're paying for.  Specifically, large developments in DTK *should* pay less than suburban sprawl developments because they make more efficient use of this infrastructure, but I have no idea if they do.

Yes they do, at least to some extent, although I don't know the extent to which they do or don't reflect actual cost of service:

https://www.kitchener.ca/en/building-and...nt-Charges

Thanks!  That is interesting, I'm glad there is some consideration.
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(01-07-2019, 10:26 AM)Spokes Wrote: Was this site considered for downtown development fee exemptions?

Nope, I believe that the boundary stopped at Victoria. I remember there was talk about extending the boundary but that never happened.
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I had a feeling it was Victoria but wasn't sure. Thanks!
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Article on the sale of Sixo to VanMar
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