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Homer Watson and Ottawa Three Lane Roundabouts
#46
(05-27-2017, 01:23 PM)GtwoK Wrote: The biggest problem I've seen with roundabouts in the region are people who use the outside lane to take a "left" (aka, 3rd exit). Many a time have I had to slam on the breaks as I was going straight through and all of a sudden someone cuts across me to go left. I don't know whats so hard to comprehend about that for drivers in the region, or if the problem is just that they're assholes.

This happened to me, once, the first time I went through the roundabout on Franklin at Pinebush. Now I know better. The thing is, if it happens once to everyone who ever drives through there, then that is a lot of occurrences.
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#47
And actually... if you're coming up Franklin, people in the outside lane from Pinebush heading East are perfectly allowed to use it to go straight through.

It is up to the person entering to determine if it is safe to do so.

The one I hate is when I'm going North on Franklin, right lane, queued to enter to go straight through and I never know if the person in the centre lane is going to exit or wrap around North on Franklin too, but in the left lane - because nobody uses their signal!

If they signal left, as in they're wrapping around, I can enter and parallel them. But if they're exiting they end up cutting across (allowed). It's just annoying because that lack of signalling hurts the overall efficiency of the system.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#48
(05-29-2017, 09:29 AM)Canard Wrote: And actually... if you're coming up Franklin, people in the outside lane from Pinebush heading East are perfectly allowed to use it to go straight through.

It is up to the person entering to determine if it is safe to do so.

The one I hate is when I'm going North on Franklin, right lane, queued to enter to go straight through and I never know if the person in the centre lane is going to exit or wrap around North on Franklin too, but in the left lane - because nobody uses their signal!

If they signal left, as in they're wrapping around, I can enter and parallel them. But if they're exiting they end up cutting across (allowed). It's just annoying because that lack of signalling hurts the overall efficiency of the system.

I'm confused by your scenario...

Assuming the person in the centre lane and you both enter at the same time:

1) They go straight (2nd exit) or left (3rd exit) and you exit at e/b Pinebush (1st exit)
     - They don't affect you.
2) They go straight (2nd exit) or left (3rd exit) and you exit at n/b Franklin (2nd exit)
     - They don't affect you.
3) They go straight (2nd exit) or left (3rd exit) and you exit at w/b Pinebush (3rd exit)
     - You are in the wrong, so you would never do this.  Smile

End of story, the lanes to your left don't affect you if you are in the proper lane.  Idiot's to your right however....  (Had an outside lane driver almost sideswipe me as they were following (3) as above)

Coke
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#49
(05-29-2017, 09:59 AM)Coke6pk Wrote:
(05-29-2017, 09:29 AM)Canard Wrote: And actually... if you're coming up Franklin, people in the outside lane from Pinebush heading East are perfectly allowed to use it to go straight through.

It is up to the person entering to determine if it is safe to do so.

The one I hate is when I'm going North on Franklin, right lane, queued to enter to go straight through and I never know if the person in the centre lane is going to exit or wrap around North on Franklin too, but in the left lane - because nobody uses their signal!

If they signal left, as in they're wrapping around, I can enter and parallel them. But if they're exiting they end up cutting across (allowed). It's just annoying because that lack of signalling hurts the overall efficiency of the system.

I'm confused by your scenario...

Assuming the person in the centre lane and you both enter at the same time:

1) They go straight (2nd exit) or left (3rd exit) and you exit at e/b Pinebush (1st exit)
     - They don't affect you.
2) They go straight (2nd exit) or left (3rd exit) and you exit at n/b Franklin (2nd exit)
     - They don't affect you.
3) They go straight (2nd exit) or left (3rd exit) and you exit at w/b Pinebush (3rd exit)
     - You are in the wrong, so you would never do this.  Smile

End of story, the lanes to your left don't affect you if you are in the proper lane.  Idiot's to your right however....  (Had an outside lane driver almost sideswipe me as they were following (3) as above)

Coke

Sorry, re-read your post Canard, and I was the one in the wrong as I misinterpreted the "enter parallel to them" comment.  Oops.

Coke
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#50
I wish the Region would do some sort of educational campaign regarding signaling in roundabouts. The rules are fairly simple and would greatly increase their efficiency, but when you even most police cars and buses fail to signal, there is clearly some sort of communication problem.
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#51
I always signal in and out of the roundabouts, but the local variety are so small that I really wonder if drivers have time to see and react to the signals of other vehicles? I would never rely on another vehicle's signal alone in deciding how/whether to proceed in a local roundabout.
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#52
Haven't we already done that? But I'm not sure you can say that the rules are fairly simple when there isn't even agreement about what exactly the rules are.

Can we at least agree to not add another sign at every roundabout entrance that provides information on signalling?
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#53
Yeah, it's a problem that people don't appreciate the situations where signalling in a roundabout really does make a difference.
Having visited a country that has history with them (New Zealand) it was very fluid to use them.  You could confidently enter a roundabout while traffic was exiting next to you.

Failing to signal in a roundabout is like failing to signal a lane change. Sure, most of the time you can get away with it, but it's much better and safer for everyone involved if we signal our intent.
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#54
In most countries in Europe, you signal your intent to exit the roundabout, but you do not need to signal your intent to continue circulating the roundabout (which is the only other choice anyway if you are not exiting).
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#55
(05-29-2017, 10:00 AM)Coke6pk Wrote: Sorry, re-read your post Canard, and I was the one in the wrong as I misinterpreted the "enter parallel to them" comment.  Oops.

Coke

No worries, my wording isn't very clear (I'm terrible at describing things).  I went to make an image, but Google Satellite view isn't quite up to date in the area.  Here's a different roundabout (Block Line), trying to show the same scenario.  Green line is my intent, red path is where the other car could go.  If they signal "left", I know they're holding the inside line, and I can go too.  If they signal right, I know their intent is to exit, crossing my path - so I wait.  If they don't signal at all, I have no idea what they're doing - so I have to wait... and if they end up staying in, then that was a missed opportunity to go (efficiency loss).

   
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#56
At the line where you are waiting it would be pretty difficult to see a left-side turn signal on the "red" car, though -- unless he were still 1/3 a circle away from you, in which case you would have enough time to go and get out of the way anyway.
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#57
Not trying to be argumentative, but I don't find it difficult at all actually.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#58
(05-29-2017, 11:58 AM)tomh009 Wrote: At the line where you are waiting it would be pretty difficult to see a left-side turn signal on the "red" car, though -- unless he were still 1/3 a circle away from you, in which case you would have enough time to go and get out of the way anyway.

Believe me, in practice, it works.
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#59
(05-29-2017, 10:49 AM)Markster Wrote: Yeah, it's a problem that people don't appreciate the situations where signalling in a roundabout really does make a difference.
Having visited a country that has history with them (New Zealand) it was very fluid to use them.  You could confidently enter a roundabout while traffic was exiting next to you.

...

There fixed it for you.  If I had a dollar for every time I missed an opportunity to cross to turn because one oncoming car slowed down without indicating an intent to turn, and screwed up timing, well, I could buy them all driving lessons.

When it comes right down too it, failure to signal is an epidemic in our city/province/country.
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#60
Alpine Roundabout is taking shape. The Homer Watson roundabout is further behind.


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