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General Road and Highway Discussion
Can't imagine the osprey platform on the east bank is going to be getting much use in the near future. It's bad enough that the eagle nest just north of the road didn't last because of the housing construction in Preston Heights.
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UpTown Waterloo:

   

   
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(10-08-2017, 01:16 PM)Canard Wrote: UpTown Waterloo:
I really like the super wide sidewalks ... bringing back walking to the Uptown.
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(10-11-2017, 10:38 PM)SammyOES Wrote:
(10-11-2017, 08:22 PM)ijmorlan Wrote: That’s why I match speed with the line at a certain point, at the absolute latest the point where the merging lane mostly clears out, and then merge at the merge point.

Sadly this kills a number of the benefits of the zipper merge - it wastes a bunch of road capacity that could hold the queued cars and pushes the congestion back to the point that it impacts other roads/intersections that shouldn't need to be impacted.  Not usually a problem on the 401, but horrible in the city.

The other lady in the story wasn't right at all.  She did something illegal.

It almost sounds like we’re okay with those people on 401 in Toronto* who, in rush-hour jams, stay in the right lane, and blast up on-ramps every chance they get to bypass ~10 cars, then cut back in as if they had just joined the highway! People at the front of the line (unless they’re like me, and watch their rear-view mirrors like a hawk) have no idea what’s happened and think “Oh I’ll let this nice person in who has just joined the highway!”, having no clue that they just jumped in front of everyone else, rewarding their bad behaviour.

* - I have never seen this dickish behaviour anywhere else.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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This type of behaviour is why I avoid driving in Toronto if I can. It just makes my blood boil.
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(10-12-2017, 04:10 AM)Canard Wrote:
(10-11-2017, 10:38 PM)SammyOES Wrote: Sadly this kills a number of the benefits of the zipper merge - it wastes a bunch of road capacity that could hold the queued cars and pushes the congestion back to the point that it impacts other roads/intersections that shouldn't need to be impacted.  Not usually a problem on the 401, but horrible in the city.

The other lady in the story wasn't right at all.  She did something illegal.

It almost sounds like we’re okay with those people on 401 in Toronto* who, in rush-hour jams, stay in the right lane, and blast up on-ramps every chance they get to bypass ~10 cars, then cut back in as if they had just joined the highway! People at the front of the line (unless they’re like me, and watch their rear-view mirrors like a hawk) have no idea what’s happened and think “Oh I’ll let this nice person in who has just joined the highway!”, having no clue that they just jumped in front of everyone else, rewarding their bad behaviour.

* - I have never seen this dickish behaviour anywhere else.
This move is alive and well in the Region... worst location being the Sportsworld onramp to highway 8 at the flyover during slow traffic. Drivers will even ride out the right lane until it merges to 2 lanes prior to the ramp, drive the shoulder and re-enter the onramp to drive up to the front of the queue. Absolutely infuriating and dangerous.
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Photo radar expected in Waterloo Region within next few years
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I've had people fly past me on the shoulder of the rural part of highway 7 to cut ahead a few spots. It's insane.
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(10-12-2017, 01:24 PM)Bob_McBob Wrote: Photo radar expected in Waterloo Region within next few years

If this is focused on school zones only, they should put up two camera posts in each school zone and then rotate a few cameras to random school zones each day.  That will provide maximum disincentive for school zone speeding with minimum human resources.
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I had someone once pass me at 120+ on the right shoulder of the 401 because they couldn't be bothered to pass on the left.
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Are photo radars really so expensive it would be cheaper to have people moving them every day than just buying enough for every location?
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Yes - "back in the day", school buses equipped with video cameras would often just have a couple at each school, and they'd rotate the camera itself in and out of different identical enclosures in each bus. As kids, we never knew if our bus had the camera that day or not. There was a little dummy flashing LED on the box to make us think it was always on, so we'd be on our best behavior.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(10-12-2017, 07:18 PM)jwilliamson Wrote: Are photo radars really so expensive it would be cheaper to have people moving them every day than just buying enough for every location?

I do believe so.  In any case, even with non-moving camera, someone needs to collect the images (I don't believe the current generation of cameras can send them unattended over the Internet).

But I could be wrong, it's been known to happen before! Big Grin
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I've seen two examples of mobile photo radar in the past 13 months: in Scotland they had a well marked van in a layby at the bottom of a straight downhill section, and in Banff a RCMP SUV was in the median of the Trans Canada with it's hood up, making you think it had broken down. Two very different ways of accomplishing the same thing.
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(10-12-2017, 09:20 PM)timio Wrote: I've seen two examples of mobile photo radar in the past 13 months: in Scotland they had a well marked van in a layby at the bottom of a straight downhill section, and in Banff a RCMP SUV was in the median of the Trans Canada with it's hood up, making you think it had broken down.  Two very different ways of accomplishing the same thing.

A recent article in Ireland said they were spending EUR 17M to run a fleet of 50 photo radar vans.  The ticket revenue was about 7M so the net cost was EUR 10M per year, or about C$300K/van/year.  If the goal is to target fixed areas such as school zones, fixed cameras are far more cost-effective.
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