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General Road and Highway Discussion
(07-11-2017, 02:11 PM)KevinT Wrote:
(07-11-2017, 02:03 PM)Markster Wrote: There's lane painting through the intersection of King/Allen as well to help guide cars, where the LRT crosses from in-median to side-running.  It's not unprecedented to add visual aids for these non-standard intersections.

I drove through that this morning and was dismayed to see that they didn't paint over the concrete portion around the embedded tracks -- the guidelines just stop and restart again.  :-(

Same situation at Charles and Borden.  It's really not obvious.
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Oh yeah, the ION team helpfully posted a photo that includes King/Allen

[Image: 19956136_10155532033612959_4476631161910...e=5A106211]
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(07-11-2017, 03:08 PM)Markster Wrote: Oh yeah, the ION team helpfully posted a photo that includes King/Allen

[Image: 19956136_10155532033612959_4476631161910...e=5A106211]

That is as close to confusing as it could be, but any reasonable (cautious) but confused driver should simply assume it is right turn only.
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Given there is a straight/right symbol right before the stop line, a reasonable driver would hopefully recognize this symbol and understand that there is a way to go straight.
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I wonder how this will play out in the middle of winter.
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Do they have some kind of phobia of painting concrete?
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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@viewfromthe42. I agree they should but if they are confused about how to go straight the safe thing to do is to turn right. Many drivers won't do this.
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(07-11-2017, 03:41 PM)KevinL Wrote: Do they have some kind of phobia of painting concrete?

No, but they won't do it until final pavement is down. Why? Because if they did it with the first layer, then when the second layer goes down, they'd have to match it up with the marks on the concrete (since it remains) and it becomes very difficult.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(07-12-2017, 02:04 AM)Canard Wrote:
(07-11-2017, 03:41 PM)KevinL Wrote: Do they have some kind of phobia of painting concrete?

No, but they won't do it until final pavement is down. Why? Because if they did it with the first layer, then when the second layer goes down, they'd have to match it up with the marks on the concrete (since it remains) and it becomes very difficult.

I'm referring to places that now do have final pavement.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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I guess so then.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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Opinion piece in the Kitchener Post today:

Car drivers get more subsidies than transit users
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(07-12-2017, 05:09 PM)Bob_McBob Wrote: Opinion piece in the Kitchener Post today:

Car drivers get more subsidies than transit users

Couple things I'd like to add:

1)  It's naive to use the toll rates for a privately owned for-profit highway as the benchmark for what a tolled road would cost. The toll rates on 407 includes profits for the 407 ETR company -- after all, it has investors -- which is why the toll are so astronomically high. In 2015 (link) they made 223 million profit on 888 million revenue.  Comparable toll roads in the US on roads that experience similar maintenance and similar wear and tear (including due to the weather) are significantly cheaper.  The tolls on the new provincially owned section of the 407 is also meant to generate a profit to be invested in infrastructure elsewhere.   
2)  Every time a car is sold and then re-sold, there is the HST that has to be paid.  A cheaper new car with $20,000 value generates $2600 in taxes, not to mention the taxes generated on the re-sales.  That tax revenue is not being considered and is probably at least $500 a year on average.
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Nice opinion piece, slightly oversimplified (the 407 costs vastly more to build and maintain than a residential street, AND the company building it is making gobs of profit), but transportation is one of the most complex systems in our society with huge impact on our way of life that make it extremely hard to cost out. But the bottom line is the same, drivers are enormously subsidized.
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p2ee, which U.S. highways do you have in mind? A lot of turnpikes in the U.S. do charge tolls, and you're right that they're low, but the tolls do not cover the entire cost of the highway. Some have tolls set to cover maintenance, but not the capital costs of the highway.

Thanks for the info on 407 ETR profit. Doesn't that suggest that, were the tolls 25% lower, they would cover the cost of the highway? That level would still be rather higher than tolls in the U.S.
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Additionally, a number of toll roads have repeatedly gone bankrupt, or had the state bail them out rather than raise tolls to cover maintenance costs.

As for GST on cars, that is a sales tax, not a road use fee.  If I instead bought a bicycle and then also went to the movies, I'd still pay that same tax, so it in no way contributes to roads.  Same for the GST applied to gas.  Only the fuel excise tax is a fee in excess of the standard sales tax we already pay.
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