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General Road and Highway Discussion
(12-10-2017, 09:02 AM)Canard Wrote: I’ve always wondered this.  It seems like that would be the case...

I struggle a little with my conscious at the Laurel Trail crossing at Erb. If there’s no one there, and I push the button, I have to wait... the I get the green and go, and then cars eventually come, I’m long gone and now they have to wait, but can probably see me riding off and start fuming, which doesn’t help anyone.

If I just go against the red “don’t cross” signal, nobody’s delayed at all, people drive through, happy as can be.

Same at Spur Line Trail/Weber, and Laurel Trail/University.

That’s why it should be green for the trail at all those locations exception when vehicular traffic triggers it. Two triggers: one right before the signal to ensure that vehicles never get trapped, and another further back, integrated with other signals where appropriate, so that in many scenarios the light goes green just before traffic reaches it. Best of both worlds.
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So I guess the poles are for flashing lights not signals (pedestrian or traffic).

[Image: pedestrians_q5_1.jpg]

"The new crosswalk won't have the overhead lights seen on traditional crosswalks, but will have warning signs topped with a flashing light. Drivers and cyclists must stop and wait until pedestrians have completely crossed the road."
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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I don't know what a Level 2 crossing is, but will it be like the crossing behind Fairview Park Mall where the pedestrian gets instant yellow strobe lights?

Coke
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(12-11-2017, 11:41 AM)Coke6pk Wrote: I don't know what a Level 2 crossing is, but will it be like the crossing behind Fairview Park Mall where the pedestrian gets instant yellow strobe lights?

Coke

I think this is what an L2 crossing looks like:

[Image: pedestrians_q9_1.jpg]
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(12-11-2017, 11:41 AM)Coke6pk Wrote: I don't know what a Level 2 crossing is, but will it be like the crossing behind Fairview Park Mall where the pedestrian gets instant yellow strobe lights?

Coke

Level 1 and Level 2 crossings are just separate refinements of the existing concept of a crosswalk. Neither of them is anything fundamentally new. Each has its own specifications of what signage and signalling is required. The codification is probably a good idea for consistency, but it’s a mystery to me why planners are so impressed with them and why they think they can now do things that they couldn’t before.

At least, as far as I can tell. If somebody can come up with an understandable explanation of the real situation I would be happy to become better informed.
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(12-11-2017, 12:33 PM)ijmorlan Wrote:
(12-11-2017, 11:41 AM)Coke6pk Wrote: I don't know what a Level 2 crossing is, but will it be like the crossing behind Fairview Park Mall where the pedestrian gets instant yellow strobe lights?

Coke

Level 1 and Level 2 crossings are just separate refinements of the existing concept of a crosswalk. Neither of them is anything fundamentally new. Each has its own specifications of what signage and signalling is required. The codification is probably a good idea for consistency, but it’s a mystery to me why planners are so impressed with them and why they think they can now do things that they couldn’t before.

At least, as far as I can tell. If somebody can come up with an understandable explanation of the real situation I would be happy to become better informed.

It has to do with policy.  There was nothing physically new, just new under the regulations that engineers feel themselves required to follow.

That being said, I wasn't at all impressed with the designs, they're useless in many areas, due to requirements for distance from existing signals which make no sense in urban areas, and also preclude many of the most troublesome trail crossings.
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Going back a few posts about left turns and what-not.  Today, first time in a while I drove straight down King from Northfield to Frederick (now that the construction is (mostly) done).  Saw a few people stopped in a lane trying to make an awkward left.  The small print on signs at the intersection should be bigger. Snow blocking the lane markings didn't help but hey, it's Canada (snow).

Also surprised to see the number of turning restrictions and traffic lights along that stretch.    

Good news is, a lot of the businesses looked vibrant!  Frontage, signage etc.
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(12-11-2017, 12:57 PM)danbrotherston Wrote: That being said, I wasn't at all impressed with the designs, they're useless in many areas, due to requirements for distance from existing signals which make no sense in urban areas, and also preclude many of the most troublesome trail crossings.

I'm blown away by the insane levels of signage required for the level 2 crosswalks at roundabouts.
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Not sure if this is the right spot to put it, but when we were driving through the SmartCentres Cambridge today, spotted about a dozen Tesla superchargers being installed on the Pinebush side.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(01-07-2018, 09:58 PM)Canard Wrote: Not sure if this is the right spot to put it, but when we were driving through the SmartCentres Cambridge today, spotted about a dozen Tesla superchargers being installed on the Pinebush side.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Looks like we will have 2 <a href="https://twitter.com/Tesla?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Tesla</a> Supercharger locations in Waterloo Region in 2018. One at the Cambridge SmartCentre and the other at Uptown Waterloo <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/EVAwesome?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#EVAwesome</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/WRAwesome?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#WRAwesome</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/WREVAGroup?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@WREVAGroup</a> <a href="https://t.co/qxyCdreTIw">pic.twitter.com/qxyCdreTIw</a></p>&mdash; ChargeWR (@ChargeWR) <a href="https://twitter.com/ChargeWR/status/949304032321064962?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 5, 2018</a></blockquote>

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Brace yourself. Victoria Street bridge closes Jan. 29
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Sooner than I thought. Frederick was pretty much bumper to bumper during times when Victoria had reduced lanes a couple months ago (yeah, yeah, walk or ride a bike instead, I get it Smile ) Curious though, the bridge is being completely closed per article title? Or reduced lanes? Or combination of both?
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(01-16-2018, 07:43 PM)embe Wrote: Sooner than I thought.  Frederick was pretty much bumper to bumper during times when Victoria had reduced lanes a couple months ago (yeah, yeah, walk or ride a bike instead, I get it Smile ) Curious though, the bridge is being completely closed per article title?  Or reduced lanes?  Or combination of both?

I'm guessing it's being totally closed, it is being replaced after all, but I'm not sure.

That being said, Shirley is now fully open, I don't know if it was before, but it should improve things, of course, it would be helpful if people in our city hadn't been trained not to follow detour signs for years previous.
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Does anyone know when the Frederick, Wellington and Guelph Sub bridges will need replacement? The new Victoria St. Bridge won't have piers between the collector and express lanes, which makes me wonder if the long-term plan is to eliminate the express-collector configuration in that stretch.
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They might also be considering the prospect of widening.

I imagine a new Guelph Sub bridge will be needed when double-tracking or high-speed rail is introduced (whichever occurs first).
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