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General Road and Highway Discussion
(09-23-2017, 07:59 PM)plam Wrote:
(09-23-2017, 06:53 PM)danbrotherston Wrote: Also, jumping the left before straight traffic is a highly illegal maneuver (equivalent in penalty to 50k over the limit/stunt driving charge), and also very dangerous, because pedestrians may be crossing.  And the West/Strange/Victoria intersection, among its various other problems, is notorious for drivers pulling this crap, and as a frequent pedestrian at this intersection, I watch out for drivers who do this.

And yet it's required in Boston. Go figure.

Required?  Huh?
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(09-23-2017, 08:54 PM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(09-23-2017, 07:59 PM)plam Wrote: And yet it's required in Boston. Go figure.

Required?  Huh?

I'm exaggerating, but sometimes there are no left turn signals and a lot of cars waiting behind you. So you'll be blocking traffic for a long time if you don't do it.
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Good progress has been made on the Uptown King St improvements this past week! King from Dupont to Bridgeport is now fully paved and has curbs. No sidewalks, trees, or bike lanes yet though.

Erb to Dupont though, I'm trying to figure out whats going on. They had done the street parking a while back (you can see a trailer parked on it here), and last Isaw they had been placing soil cells underground. Now, it looks like they've paved over the soil cells? Is this new cement supposed to be a sidewalk? Where's the bike path? Why the the cement so much lower than the top of the curbs? Can't quite figure out what's going on.

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(10-01-2017, 05:56 PM)GtwoK Wrote: Good progress has been made on the Uptown King St improvements this past week! King from Dupont to Bridgeport is now fully paved and has curbs. No sidewalks, trees, or bike lanes yet though.

Erb to Dupont though, I'm trying to figure out whats going on. They had done the street parking a while back (you can see a trailer parked on it here), and last Isaw they had been placing soil cells underground. Now, it looks like they've paved over the soil cells? Is this new cement supposed to be a sidewalk? Where's the bike path? Why the the cement so much lower than the top of the curbs? Can't quite figure out what's going on.
...

It looks like they're going to put down two layers of concrete, which is common for roads (asphalt ones at least) but I didn't think they did for sidewalks. Maybe the expect this one to be driven on more often.

And yes, they poured concrete over the soil cells, but you can see they've left holes for trees, which is their intended function. I think they've now done the same on King St. at Victoria St.

I'm also not entirely sure where the bike lanes will go.
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(10-01-2017, 05:56 PM)GtwoK Wrote: Why the the cement so much lower than the top of the curbs? Can't quite figure out what's going on.

Could it be that the concrete is poured first, then paved over top of to build up the layer flush with the curb? That would give a really sturdy base, but then have the nice smooth paved surface over top to ride on.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(09-23-2017, 06:53 PM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(09-23-2017, 02:13 PM)ijmorlan Wrote: ...

I don’t think I’ve heard the term “Pittsburgh Left”. Is that turning left on a new green before oncoming straight-through traffic has a chance to get going?

As to the questions about which traffic is controlled by the pedestrian crossing, imagine for a moment that the crossing was moved back from the intersection, maybe 50m although it doesn’t matter exactly how far as long as it is far enough that it is clear that the pedestrian crossing is not related to the intersection at all. Then it would be absolutely clear that you can’t go through the red to make a right turn, and it would be equally clear that a left turn during the red signal would be perfectly legal, in the same way that it is legal to go when the stoplight at the next intersection is red — signals don’t control everyone who can see them, only people who are coming up close to them.

And if, on the other hand, the intersection itself was fully controlled, it would be clear, in the absence of signage to the contrary, that the right turn on red would be permitted and the left turn forbidden.

But instead we have what looks like an independent pedestrian crossing, but so close to the intersection that it seems that intersection signal rules might apply.

Those intersections can be rather confusing.  Basically, I always take them as "don't cross the crosswalk", but things again, would be safer and clearer if we didn't have right on red.

Also, jumping the left before straight traffic is a highly illegal maneuver (equivalent in penalty to 50k over the limit/stunt driving charge), and also very dangerous, because pedestrians may be crossing.  And the West/Strange/Victoria intersection, among its various other problems, is notorious for drivers pulling this crap, and as a frequent pedestrian at this intersection, I watch out for drivers who do this.

The police really should stake out Victoria and West/Strange. Everyone jumps the left turn on green it seems. And it's illegal.
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(10-01-2017, 06:51 PM)GtwoK Wrote: Why the the cement so much lower than the top of the curbs? Can't quite figure out what's going on.

I've seen this before - on King Street Downtown. Paving stones were (are!) arranged within the recessed area.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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Traffic on Ottawa Street between Franklin and River is now on the ... south ... (newly repaved) side. No paving west of Franklin yet.

I feel a bit nervous driving between the Expressway and Franklin. The drop behind the pylons is at least 2' in some spaces and the lane seems to be too narrow for comfort.
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(10-01-2017, 08:45 PM)KevinL Wrote:
(10-01-2017, 06:51 PM)GtwoK Wrote: Why the the cement so much lower than the top of the curbs? Can't quite figure out what's going on.

I've seen this before - on King Street Downtown. Paving stones were (are!) arranged within the recessed area.

This would be great!  Here's hoping that's what it is.
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We were talking the other week about the ridiculous proposal for the Weber bridge over the Spur Line (thankfully not yet a done deal). I work in the area and have been driving a fair bit lately for work the last few weeks- the bridge has been reduced to one lane each direction, and I note that, at all times of the day, traffic is free flowing even with that restriction.

Others have noted that the traffic volumes just do not justify that many car lanes, but often people don't grasp that and think there's something special about a given road that will mean, if narrowed, it will experience serious backups or delays. It's hard to argue that for Weber: it's one lane each direction now, and if you drive there at 8:00 in the morning, noon, 5:00 in the afternoon, whenever, you'll find traffic moving along in excess of the speed limit.
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MidTowner, can you please share that perspective with Regional Council?
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(10-03-2017, 06:26 AM)MidTowner Wrote: We were talking the other week about the ridiculous proposal for the Weber bridge over the Spur Line (thankfully not yet a done deal). I work in the area and have been driving a fair bit lately for work the last few weeks- the bridge has been reduced to one lane each direction, and I note that, at all times of the day, traffic is free flowing even with that restriction.

Others have noted that the traffic volumes just do not justify that many car lanes, but often people don't grasp that and think there's something special about a given road that will mean, if narrowed, it will experience serious backups or delays. It's hard to argue that for Weber: it's one lane each direction now, and if you drive there at 8:00 in the morning, noon, 5:00 in the afternoon, whenever, you'll find traffic moving along in excess of the speed limit.


I can second this comment, I actually work on Dutton and morning / evening rush hour has never been an issue. The largest issue was back when Bearinger was closed for long periods during ION construction and traffic along Weber increased significantly.
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(10-03-2017, 08:41 AM)JCnb Wrote:
(10-03-2017, 06:26 AM)MidTowner Wrote: We were talking the other week about the ridiculous proposal for the Weber bridge over the Spur Line (thankfully not yet a done deal). I work in the area and have been driving a fair bit lately for work the last few weeks- the bridge has been reduced to one lane each direction, and I note that, at all times of the day, traffic is free flowing even with that restriction.

Others have noted that the traffic volumes just do not justify that many car lanes, but often people don't grasp that and think there's something special about a given road that will mean, if narrowed, it will experience serious backups or delays. It's hard to argue that for Weber: it's one lane each direction now, and if you drive there at 8:00 in the morning, noon, 5:00 in the afternoon, whenever, you'll find traffic moving along in excess of the speed limit.


I can second this comment, I actually work on Dutton and morning / evening rush hour has never been an issue. The largest issue was back when Bearinger was closed for long periods during ION construction and traffic along Weber increased significantly.

Definitely worth sharing this with council.  Most councillors disagree.
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If you put the bridge on a road diet, you really should do the same for the surrounding bits of Weber as well, otherwise you create a bottleneck with lanes disappearing and reappearing around the bridget.
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(10-03-2017, 10:08 AM)tomh009 Wrote: If you put the bridge on a road diet, you really should do the same for the surrounding bits of Weber as well, otherwise you create a bottleneck with lanes disappearing and reappearing around the bridget.

So how much?  The original road diet plan had lane reductions between Parkside and Albert, both signalized intersections, which I believe is the same extent of the current reduction.
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