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General Road and Highway Discussion
(08-10-2017, 10:22 AM)Markster Wrote: In another world, where road design was responsive to not just the needs, but also the wants of everything-but-cars, this could have been the pedestrian diagram:

That's really not a big change as such, but we're a bit late in the game. What's the cost of building maybe 200-300m of MUT?  I'm guessing it shouldn't cost much more than $200K per kilometre, so 300m might be $60K, not so much to gain a big improvement.  Maybe worth reaching out to the region to see whether theu might be able to consider it?
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But the new design gives pedestrians the right of way. The old design with lights meant they had to push "BEG BUTTONS!!!!" to get the privelage of crossing.

Now you can just keep on walking and cars yeild to you.

So it's really not fair to say there's no advantage here to pedestrians.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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They're putting in a median on King at Chopin in Preston. Is this to keep people from turning left or are they putting in a two-way bike route and I missed it?
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(08-10-2017, 12:20 PM)DHLawrence Wrote: They're putting in a median on King at Chopin in Preston. Is this to keep people from turning left or are they putting in a two-way bike route and I missed it?

I believe this is the final design (from https://icreate3.esolutionsgroup.ca/2306...endixQ.pdf).

   
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(08-02-2017, 06:17 PM)danbrotherston Wrote: Of course, it would be far more meaningful if Queen is also improved, and would have been even more so if Highland had been improved as well, but that ship has sailed.

Sorry for the delayed response; still catching up and processing a lot of posts after being away.

I have never understood why Queen (the Blvd part from Westheights to Highland) is not targeted more as a cycling route or at least preferred to Highland (a lost cause at this point for cycling) which does have cycling lanes for a part (that go from nowhere (Fischer-Hallman) to nowhere (Westmount)).

Queen has way more capacity than it will ever need. It could easily be reduced to 1 EB, 1WB, and a centre turning lane, and still have room for physically separated bike lanes both EB and WB. The fact that on-street parking is even allowed on large stretches of it is obscene and proves that it is overbuilt and not fulfilling its designed purpose (as an city arterial road in the Kitchener road classification system its primary purpose is to, "provide mobility for people and goods through and within the City" - so by clogging an artery with parking it is unable to do its job). In fact, the recommendation is that on-street parking is "Generally None" and cycling facilities "Separated Preferred". Map of street classifications.

I am beginning to think that one way to convince more people outside of the typical bike lanes advocates about the value of cycling lanes is through their pocket-books. Make it a political issue that we can chip away the infrastructure deficit simply by building smarter (e.g. narrow roads with segregated bike lanes, 3 lane roads (1+1+turning) instead of 4 (2+2), etc.). Use that recent City of Ottawa study to illustrate that over-building a road simply to paint a line for cyclists is a waste of capital when bike lanes don't need to be built to sustain so much force (they should still be built to last though!).
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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(08-10-2017, 11:02 PM)Pheidippides Wrote: I have never understood why Queen (the Blvd part from Westheights to Highland) is not targeted more as a cycling route or at least preferred to Highland (a lost cause at this point for cycling) which does have cycling lanes for a part (that go from nowhere (Fischer-Hallman) to nowhere (Westmount)).

That's not the most ludicrous example of bike lanes from nowhere to nowhere in this city.  Franklin St in Kitchener has bike lines from Kingsway to the Freshco parking lot (  https://goo.gl/maps/CqaDFjaTk8R2), a total of 50 metres before trickling down to nothing on the one end and fully disappearing at the other.  No other road in the area has bike lanes.
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I think Lackner is by far the worst example of bike lanes going from nowhere to nowhere in the city. I don't know what they were thinking with that road, but there's a good argument that the bike lanes on Lackner are actually more of a hazard than an aid in their current incarnation.
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Every time I drive or Bike on Lackner in that area I think of you, jamincan!

I'll go take a hilarious zoomed-in-from-afar photo some time of the bike lane starts/bike lane ends signs in the areas where they're so close together. It's absurd!
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(08-10-2017, 10:12 AM)Markster Wrote: A bunch of the extra walking created by the roundabout crossings could also be reduced by just paving some trivial desire lines.  These go through large grassy fields, and cut off a big chunk of the walk.  There was no design from a pedestrian perspective.

What do you think about this design?

For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(08-11-2017, 06:55 AM)timio Wrote:
(08-10-2017, 11:02 PM)Pheidippides Wrote: I have never understood why Queen (the Blvd part from Westheights to Highland) is not targeted more as a cycling route or at least preferred to Highland (a lost cause at this point for cycling) which does have cycling lanes for a part (that go from nowhere (Fischer-Hallman) to nowhere (Westmount)).

That's not the most ludicrous example of bike lanes from nowhere to nowhere in this city.  Franklin St in Kitchener has bike lines from Kingsway to the Freshco parking lot (  https://goo.gl/maps/CqaDFjaTk8R2), a total of 50 metres before trickling down to nothing on the one end and fully disappearing at the other.  No other road in the area has bike lanes.

I actually don't mind those bike lanes much.  The road beyond (in one direction at least) is a neighbourhood connector, not exactly low traffic, but at least not a major road.  But the section with bike lanes is a highway overpass (one without an interchange and with bike lanes is something desperately needed for connectivity), but also, because it is an overpass, it is much busier.  While I would like to see it connected, and such connections *are* in the city's bike plan...whether that will happen any time soon we will see, I would say that the bike lanes are on the most important section, and a section which people and cyclists probably want to use to get over the highway.
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