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Number of Tower Cranes 2015
#16
(04-01-2015, 03:09 PM)Watdot Wrote: If the Sunview crane went up March 10th, then this is a new Lester St crane that went up yesterday, March 31st.   Quite the crane density happening now...

Edit: Yes, there is a new crane in the lot right behind the Sunview construction, facing Lester St.

The density is amazing, considering there are two more on campus just West, one more just East, on the Sage properties and the one from 133 Icon. That's nine cranes in a very small area.
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#17
There's a few cranes in Galt now, one at Cambridge memorial and another at the condos just south of the CPR bridge over the river. There's another Condo going up just south of Main(?) & Concession but I don't remember if there is a tower crane or not.
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#18
UW Science Teaching Complex crane is coming down next week, according to today's Daily Bulletin.
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#19
Yesterday, King St. in front of the Kaufman Lofts was closed off because they were disassembling the giant Tower Crane at One Victoria! (or is it One Hundred Victoria? I can never remember.)
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#20
One Victoria. I remember it because all "north/south" streets switch direction at King, with addresses in the single digits.

One Hundred is their project further down by Park.
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#21
There are now two cranes in K2 and another crane in Ira Needles and Erb St. I also think Barrel Yards had three cranes at some point.


What are we up to now, 27 or so?

I guess this must be some kind of record for the region.
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#22
It has probably been mentioned earlier, but there are two cranes up for the Cambridge Hospital expansion.
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#23
(09-20-2015, 06:48 PM)BuildingScout Wrote: There are now two cranes in K2 and another crane in Ira Needles and Erb St. I also think Barrel Yards had  three cranes at some point.


What are we up to now, 27 or so?

I guess this must be some kind of record for the region.

I would guess we would be the authority on that type of thing hah.
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#24
At what point will the efficiencies of density / intensification start to cause our taxes to go down?
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#25
(09-21-2015, 08:38 AM)eizenstriet Wrote: At what point will the efficiencies of density / intensification start to cause our taxes to go down?

Uhhh, never seems like a safe bet.  Unless by "down" you mean lower than they might be without increased density - but will we ever know?
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#26
And even though politicians may want taxes to go down and may even shift the tax rate downward, if all the increased development puts pressure on land prices to go up, then the dollar value of your property taxes will go up anyway.
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#27
(09-21-2015, 02:14 PM)nms Wrote: And even though politicians may want taxes to go down and may even shift the tax rate downward, if all the increased development puts pressure on land prices to go up, then the dollar value of your property taxes will go up anyway.

The presumption there is that you have land associated with your property. If your property is building-only, and depreciates, maybe tax rates could be reduced such that your property tax goes down.

Probably the Region of Waterloo is not doing enough densification to have a big enough impact. Yes, if more (for instance) water users are brought online without the need for (much) new water infrastructure, rates might fall. But that's not what is happening: some new users are brought into the system in dense areas who do not need new infrastructure. But, at least for the time being, they are still called upon to pay for new infrastructure in developments in green lands with forty foot lots...
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#28
(09-21-2015, 02:14 PM)nms Wrote: And even though politicians may want taxes to go down and may even shift the tax rate downward, if all the increased development puts pressure on land prices to go up, then the dollar value of your property taxes will go up anyway.

That's not how I understand Ontario municipal taxes work.

What happens is that first the city and region decide that they need $100M in taxes for 2015 and property values are $10B. Then the tax rate gets set to 1%.

OK, now let's say it's 2016. The city and region now need $110M. But the values go to $15B. The tax rate would then go to 0.73%.

(http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/home...e14831630/)
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#29
(09-21-2015, 05:57 PM)plam Wrote:
(09-21-2015, 02:14 PM)nms Wrote: And even though politicians may want taxes to go down and may even shift the tax rate downward, if all the increased development puts pressure on land prices to go up, then the dollar value of your property taxes will go up anyway.

That's not how I understand Ontario municipal taxes work.

What happens is that first the city and region decide that they need $100M in taxes for 2015 and property values are $10B. Then the tax rate gets set to 1%.

OK, now let's say it's 2016. The city and region now need $110M. But the values go to $15B. The tax rate would then go to 0.73%.

(http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/home...e14831630/)

You are both correct. The important link is that we are affected by how our property value (property, building, etc) changes relative to everyone else in Waterloo. If the tax rate saw no change, you would think that your taxes wouldn't change. But if you and your neighbour both had $400K houses last year, and this year your neighbour's was worth $200K and yours was worth $600K, the tax paid (which is what we really care about) would be halved for your neighbour and increased by 50% for yourself.
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#30
(09-22-2015, 06:44 AM)Viewfromthe42 Wrote:
(09-21-2015, 05:57 PM)plam Wrote: That's not how I understand Ontario municipal taxes work.

What happens is that first the city and region decide that they need $100M in taxes for 2015 and property values are $10B. Then the tax rate gets set to 1%.

OK, now let's say it's 2016. The city and region now need $110M. But the values go to $15B. The tax rate would then go to 0.73%.

(http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/home...e14831630/)

You are both correct. The important link is that we are affected by how our property value (property, building, etc) changes relative to everyone else in Waterloo. If the tax rate saw no change, you would think that your taxes wouldn't change. But if you and your neighbour both had $400K houses last year, and this year your neighbour's was worth $200K and yours was worth $600K, the tax paid (which is what we really care about) would be halved for your neighbour and increased by 50% for yourself.

Yes, I meant to mention that as well but it slipped my mind. Thanks!
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