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High-Speed Rail (HSR) - Toronto/Pearson/Kitchener/London
(08-13-2017, 11:18 AM)Canard Wrote: Japan is spending trillions of dollars building a single magnetic levitation line between Tokyo and Osaka. I visited the test track - and it was built like 20 years ago and they're still developing it. The best minds are on it.
Trillions of yen, not dollars. Which is still on the order of tens or hundreds of billions of Canadian dollars.
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I'm with Canard. Simply running at RER speeds would get us a step closer, today, for a fraction of the cost. We can upgrade after that when we get used to building grade separations and updating the rail legislation.

In the scales we're looking, I'm not sure we even need hyperloop speeds or even maglev. A TGV at hundreds of kph would sort us quite handily (opinion).
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(08-13-2017, 11:18 AM)Canard Wrote: I strongly urge anyone who has faith in Hyperloop becoming a thing to familiarize themselves with the history of magnetic levitation in general.





(Part 2 here: https://youtu.be/FWEV0vxqul8 )

Japan is spending trillions of dollars building a single magnetic levitation line between Tokyo and Osaka. I visited the test track - and it was built like 20 years ago and they're still developing it. The best minds are on it.

I love Elon Musk - I really do. But how can he think that he can just snap his fingers and change everything? Why does he think he can magically do better than decades of real engineering in Germany and Japan?

What he's doing with SpaceX is incredible, and I'm convinced he'll get to Mars before NASA. But all he's done with Hyperloop is deflect actual political (and worse - public) interest away from viable, proven, existing technology that should be implemented now. My fear is that real HSR projects could be delayed or cancelled with the mindset of "oh, let's just wait for Hyperloop".

If Transrapid had become a thing (and it crushes me that it didn't, beyond the SMT), look how long it took. Hyperloop (or something hyperloop-ish) might one day transport people. But it won't be in 2 years. Maybe 100. Can you even imagine the certification and whole safety aspect? "Oh, oops - the door opened and everyone inside exploded. Too bad." Transport Canada won't even let us have a light rail like through a damn park!

Nothing changes quickly in the rail industry!

Nothing changes quickly in the rail industry because no one is willing to change quickly in the rail industry. 
All it takes is something like Uber or AirBnB to change the entire industry - wait for it - quickly...

I disagree with your mindset. Where there is a will, there is a way.
Where people flock, anything can happen. 
It's the 21st century, technology is expanding exponentially.
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I get what you're saying, Jordan, that Hyperloop would be an 'industry disruptor'. And it could be, IF it lives up to its promise - but I find that very unlikely, given the steep technological curve that needs to be overcome and the limitations that have been found by third parties looking over the proposals.

I remain highly skeptical, to say the least.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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Can infrastructure be disrupted by the gig economy? I can't see it. I'm not saying that because my limited imagination can't think it up that it therefore cannot exist, but both uber and airbnb are examples of the same central idea that doesn't seem to apply to infrastructure projects. (both are earning fractions of unused capacity that have already been built).

Maybe a Tesla/SpaceX-style "Some wealthy "idiot" is willing to front the cash to hurdle the initial spend and make it likely to succeed" approach would be more likely. A pity Lazaridis and Balsillie are more interested in spending it all on education instead of transit.

Ah well, one need at a time.
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D'Amato's very pessimistic view of yesterday's announcements:

https://www.therecord.com/opinion-story/...fake-news/

... I do agree with some of it.
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(10-24-2017, 08:24 AM)urbd Wrote: D'Amato's very pessimistic view of yesterday's announcements:

https://www.therecord.com/opinion-story/...fake-news/

... I do agree with some of it.

I disagree with the further abuse of the term "fake news".

That being said, it was a bit of a disappointing announcement, but I also didn't see it hyped all that much.

@chutten  I agree, I have a hard time seeing infra getting disrupted.  That takes orders of magnitude more money and effort.  Uber can come and go in an a year, infra you build is a decades long proposal.  Not only is it difficult, it's also risky, if hyperloop has some unintended consequences (like the freeways did) it would be good to know about them before deploying a billion lane KMs or so.
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D'Amato's piece is more pot-shots at Wynne and her government in general than HSR specifically. That's just the headline.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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(10-24-2017, 08:58 AM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(10-24-2017, 08:24 AM)urbd Wrote: D'Amato's very pessimistic view of yesterday's announcements:

https://www.therecord.com/opinion-story/...fake-news/

... I do agree with some of it.

I disagree with the further abuse of the term "fake news".

That being said, it was a bit of a disappointing announcement, but I also didn't see it hyped all that much.

@chutten  I agree, I have a hard time seeing infra getting disrupted.  That takes orders of magnitude more money and effort.  Uber can come and go in an a year, infra you build is a decades long proposal.  Not only is it difficult, it's also risky, if hyperloop has some unintended consequences (like the freeways did) it would be good to know about them before deploying a billion lane KMs or so.
This was non-news and certainly didn't warrant a press release - it could have waited until she had actually appointed folks to the advisory board.
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I don't have a problem with press releases.  More is better, imo.

The media doesn't have to cover them.

Edit: But I certainly agree with the opinion that HSR is a long way away and there's not much point taking it seriously yet.
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