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High-Speed Rail (HSR) - Toronto/Pearson/Kitchener/London
(02-17-2019, 11:19 PM)KevinL Wrote: I get the logistical reason for starting in the central segment, but I think having visible construction progress in some bigger cities would have given the project more public support. As it stands it's a victim of ridicule; 'tracks to nowhere', etc.

Not just logistical, but also as a matter of providing much-needed support to the central California economy, which is not like the coastal economy at all. But yes, definitely more visible if near the cities. Yet building there is super hard.
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Think about if our LRT went from say, Kitchener Market to Seagram. How pointless would that be? They have to build the whole thing.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(02-18-2019, 08:44 AM)Canard Wrote: Think about if our LRT went from say, Kitchener Market to Seagram.  How pointless would that be?  They have to build the whole thing.

I think it’s worse. Kitchener Market to Seagram would actually be (somewhat) useful. Whereas my understanding of the HSR segment to be built is it’s basically just a random section in the middle of nowhere, maybe like Randall Drive to Scotch Line Road (with the long-term goal being LRT to Elmira).
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It's more like Kitchener Market to Seagram on electric power and then connecting to coal power, but still on rails, up to Conestoga Mall. Merced is connected to Oakland by Amtrak service, and I hope they'll be able to run the same train all the way to Oakland, just not at high speed. Of course, North Americans these days are pretty good at doing infrastructure wrong.

https://sf.streetsblog.org/2019/02/14/hi...-stranded/

Attached picture in Oakland is definitely not HSR track.

Bakersfield is pretty moderate-sized. Fresno's on the line too, and it's slightly smaller than Waterloo Region. Merced is tiny. These areas are probably not enough to justify HSR on their own. But getting to SF would be quite useful even if they didn't connect to LA. (oh, hi from LA).


Attached Files Image(s)
   
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(02-17-2019, 10:34 PM)plam Wrote:
(02-17-2019, 12:37 PM)Square Wrote: I guess Ontario is not the only place with problems : https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/...l-canceled

They're still building the Central California segment. We'll see what happens with the rest of it...

The problem (well, one of the many problems) is that they started this project with only a partial budget, and it's nowhere near enough to complete the route they want (and need).
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Like everyone else said, without the whole system, what's the point??
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Presuming trains running from San Francisco to LA can benefit from the high-speed track in the central areas, service is still improved, it's just an incremental improvement.
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2019 Ontario Budget 

Quote:HIGH-SPEED RAIL: VALUE FOR MONEY?
The Province has paused capital funding for high‐speed rail in the 2019 Ontario Budget and is actively exploring opportunities to enhance the train speeds and service levels on existing railway corridors, as well as opportunities for inter‐community bus services or other transit solutions that better support the immediate needs of Southwestern Ontario.  

The Province is completing an analysis of new and existing rail service options that consider the social, environmental and economic impact to area residents, landowners, farmers, businesses and the natural environment.

The Province has listened to the residents in Southwestern Ontario who have expressed concerns that high‐speed rail would have negative social, environmental and economic impacts for the region. For example, the agricultural community has warned that the project would create a physical barrier that would eliminate countless hectares of prime agricultural land in one of Canada’s richest farm belts, restricting access to homes, fields and markets. The Province will bring forward a transportation plan for Southwestern Ontario by fall 2019.
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(04-12-2019, 09:18 AM)Ace Wrote: 2019 Ontario Budget 

Quote:HIGH-SPEED RAIL: VALUE FOR MONEY?
The Province has paused capital funding for high‐speed rail in the 2019 Ontario Budget and is actively exploring opportunities to enhance the train speeds and service levels on existing railway corridors, as well as opportunities for inter‐community bus services or other transit solutions that better support the immediate needs of Southwestern Ontario.  

The Province is completing an analysis of new and existing rail service options that consider the social, environmental and economic impact to area residents, landowners, farmers, businesses and the natural environment.

The Province has listened to the residents in Southwestern Ontario who have expressed concerns that high‐speed rail would have negative social, environmental and economic impacts for the region. For example, the agricultural community has warned that the project would create a physical barrier that would eliminate countless hectares of prime agricultural land in one of Canada’s richest farm belts, restricting access to homes, fields and markets. The Province will bring forward a transportation plan for Southwestern Ontario by fall 2019.

I wonder how many decimals of precision one would need to measure the chance this analysis fairly considers HSR impacts vs. building more roads to support the same growth.
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One suspects it will remain "paused" until the lead-up to the next provincial election campaign.
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Anyone actually surprised by this?
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(04-12-2019, 09:53 AM)bgb_ca Wrote: Anyone actually surprised by this?

The circle of life.  One government promises to Study HSR then next government puts it on pause. We are so non progressive when it comes to transportation.
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HSR would be expensive to ride as well. Better to put resources into making GO competetive with driving the 401.
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(04-12-2019, 10:26 AM)kps Wrote: HSR would be expensive to ride as well. Better to put resources into making GO competetive with driving the 401.

I am ok with that if they can reduce the travel time.  2 hours isn't acceptable in today's day and age.
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(04-12-2019, 10:26 AM)kps Wrote: HSR would be expensive to ride as well. Better to put resources into making GO competetive with driving the 401.

This is both relative and unsubstantiated.

The business case evaluation was considering what price points would drive what ridership and what ridership at which price points would justify the investment.

Via Rail is already "expensive" and competitive with driving the 401.
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