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UW Engineering VII | ?m | 7fl | U/C
#1
UW Engineering VII
Developer:
Architect: Perkins+Will
Project: The new $88-million Engineering 7 building will include a 3D printing (also called additive manufacturing) lab and a two-storey aerial robotics testing facility.
The seven-storey, 230,000-square-foot building will allow the faculty to accommodate growth from the new biomedical engineering program and an expanded mechatronics engineering program.

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Location source

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#2
University of Waterloo approves $88-million Engineering 7 building
October 29, 2014 |  uwaterloo.ca | LINK

Quote:The University of Waterloo’s Board of Governors approved the construction of the $88-million Engineering 7 (E7) building yesterday. The University’s Building and Properties Committee made the proposal for the 230,000-square-foot, seven-storey building to house Waterloo Engineering’s ongoing transformation of how it delivers education to students.

“As the University of Waterloo continues to emerge as one of the world’s top innovation universities, the construction of E7 will enable us to attract even more of the best and brightest students and faculty who will undertake their studies and research here,” said Feridun Hamdullahpur, president and vice-chancellor of Waterloo. “Nearly 8,500 undergraduate engineering students will engage in experiential education opportunities in E7, which will also provide space for faculty and graduate students to engage in a research portfolio of disruptive technologies.”  

E7 will accommodate growth from the recently launched biomedical engineering program and the expansion of the Faculty of Engineering’s highly popular mechatronics engineering program. It will also house the Faculty’s new teaching innovation, the multidisciplinary Engineering Ideas Clinic™, where undergraduate students starting from first year integrate classroom theory with hands-on learning as they design, build, test and refine ideas. The Conrad Business, Entrepreneurship and Technology Centre will relocate to E7, where faculty and mentors will offer a new entrepreneurship option. The building will have dedicated study and social spaces for students, lecture halls and entrepreneurial support areas, along with areas for student teams to prototype their Capstone Design projects.

“With the construction of E7, Waterloo Engineering will graduate even more highly sought-after engineers while catalyzing more innovations, inspiring more entrepreneurs and supporting the next wave of high-impact research,” said Pearl Sullivan, dean of the Faculty of Engineering. “E7 is not just a building, the entire design will enable engineering to take our unique educational experience to the next level and realize our vision for educating the engineer of the future.”  

E7 will have some of the best research facilities in the world, including an additive manufacturing—or 3D printing—laboratory, and an indoor flight arena for testing autonomous and robotic vehicles.   Many graduate students will likely work to advance technologies including the rapidly progressing Internet of Things, infrastructure and develop wearable biomedical devices to monitor human health. 

An atrium and elevated pedestrian bridges will link E7 to Engineering 5 and 6.  The target start date for construction is next fall.  
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#3
So looks like pedestrian links to E6 and the future E9?
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#4
UW has released some more information about Engineering VII


Quote:"To accommodate major undergraduate growth, E7 will provide much-needed teaching space for the Faculty’s new biomedical engineering, which received over 900 applications this year, and expanded mechatronics engineering programs. It will house some of the best research facilities in the world, including an additive manufacturing (3D printing) laboratory.  E7 will also be home to the Conrad Business, Entrepreneurship and Technology Centre and the multidisciplinary Engineering Ideas Clinic™, where undergraduate students integrate classroom theory with hands-on learning as they design, build, test and refine ideas. Construction on E7 is expected to begin this fall and take three years."


 I understand that there will also be a large sealed atrium for drone testing. Apparently, at least according to this image below, there will also be a water table and sand box.

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#5
It would be nice if the University were allowed to build over the rail corridor. It would effectively enclose the station there and help bridge the gap between the East Campus and the Central Campus.
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#6
Splash pool and sandbox?
But I thought they just finished building their new children's daycare facility?
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#7
(04-28-2015, 03:09 PM)jamincan Wrote: It would be nice if the University were allowed to build over the rail corridor. It would effectively enclose the station there and help bridge the gap between the East Campus and the Central Campus.

Nice, but not likely.  Given that heavy freight will be traveling along there in perpetuity, I can't see that being a preferred option.
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#8
Toronto has yet to "build over the rail corridor" they have downtown. The University has a hell of a lot of land to build on that is a lot less architecturally challenging.
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#9
(05-01-2015, 01:37 AM)Markster Wrote:  The University has a hell of a lot of land to build on that is a lot less architecturally challenging.

This is another ugly building on a campus of ugly buildings. The university really has no unifying theme. The architectural challenge U of W faces is the world taking it's school of architecture seriously.
_____________________________________
I used to be the mayor of sim city. I know what I am talking about.
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#10
I was speaking of course about the challenge of the engineering aspect of architecture, not the aesthetics.
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#11
Carleton built a parking garage over part of the O-Train line despite identical limitations and a similar abundance of space.
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#12
(05-01-2015, 03:05 PM)jamincan Wrote: Carleton built a parking garage over part of the O-Train line despite identical limitations and a similar abundance of space.

Does freight operate on the same tracks as the O-Train? That would be the biggest hurtle for building over the spur line. You'd have to engineer for a worst-case scenario: a train derailing and catching fire. There's no way they'd try to build over the tracks as long as there are diesel locomotives hauling chemical cars.
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#13
Yes, it does. The O-Train is run on freight track with time of use separation, and is still used at night for freight.

The passenger trains are actually European mainline railway vehicles, and are diesel powered. It's not like other LRT systems in Canada.
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#14
(05-01-2015, 10:59 AM)Drake Wrote:
(05-01-2015, 01:37 AM)Markster Wrote:  The University has a hell of a lot of land to build on that is a lot less architecturally challenging.

This is another ugly building on a campus of ugly buildings. The university really has no unifying theme. The architectural challenge U of W faces is the world taking it's school of architecture seriously.

 "This is another ugly building on a campus of ugly buildings."  


 A non-religious "Amen" 
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#15
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