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The Schlegel-University of Waterloo Research Institute for Aging
#1
The Schlegel-University of Waterloo Research Institute for Aging 
Northeast corner of Bearinger Rd and Laurelwood Dr, Waterloo
Project: It will be built in three phases and include a three-storey long-term care building, two 10-storey apartment buildings, more than 330 retirement home beds, a health centre and amenities. The $160-million development will combine retirement and long-term care living with a health centre and a research centre in partnership with the University of Waterloo.


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Approx location


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Site conditions prior to redevelopment


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#2
Partners to build research centre for seniors at the University of Waterloo

August 30, 2011 | http://schlegelvillages.com/LINK

Quote:WATERLOO, Ont. (Monday, Aug. 29, 2011) - An ambitious partnership involving the Ontario government, postsecondary sector and Schlegel Villages will develop a centre of excellence for research, training and innovation in senior health care and wellness at the University of Waterloo. The goal is to help Canada better prepare for an aging population.


The development on Waterloo’s north campus will be built in three phases, starting with a 192-bed long-term care home owned and managed by Schlegel Villages. It will include a specialized building where faculty, staff and students from the University of Waterloo, Conestoga College and the Schlegel-University of Waterloo Research Institute for Aging (RIA) will work and learn with residents and staff from the adjacent long-term home. 

Two later phases will develop assisted living and independent living for seniors as well as a primary care health centre to create a full continuum of care. Total construction costs will be about $130-million.

“This project is a sterling example of government, university, college and private collaboration,” said Ron Schlegel, chair of Schlegel Villages and Founder of the RIA. “We have a university that is tops in Canada for innovation and entrepreneurship, a college with a passion for building a workforce better equipped to meet the needs of growing numbers of seniors, a research institute with a strong track record in practice-relevant research, and a provider of long-term care and retirement that is a leader in the province.”     

The Ontario government will contribute $20-million in capital funds for the 192-bed long-term care home. The province will also provide $625,000 a year in operating funds for the learning, research and innovation centre. The provincial funding will enhance capacity and expertise in the long-term care sector, as well as improve the delivery of existing long-term care services.

“I have worked consistently for the last four years to secure 192 long-term care beds for the seniors in our community,” said Leeanna Pendergast, MPP for Kitchener-Conestoga. “The Schlegel-University of Waterloo Research Institute for Aging brings cutting-edge services to our community not found anywhere else in North America."

The province's investment unleashes an estimated $84-million in additional funding for teaching and research, including financial and land contributions from the University of Waterloo The Schlegel family will provide a minimum $45-million over 20 years to fund 14 research chairs in aging, matched fifty-fifty by the University of Waterloo and one research chair matched fifty-fifty by Conestoga College. The family will also contribute $3-million to the capital costs for the learning, research and innovation centre. 

These contributions build on the $6-million Schlegel has already committed to found the RIA for a total investment of over $50-million. Four research chairs are already in place and actively working in the areas of geriatric medicine, geriatric pharmacotherapy, vascular aging and brain health, and nutrition, while a fifth chair in enhanced senior care is at Conestoga College. The new learning, research and innovation centre will be operated as part of RIA.

The work of the centre of excellence will inform policy and program decisions to directly and positively impact on a number of government priorities, including long-term care transformation, building human resource capacity in the seniors care system, resident-centred care, reducing emergency room visits, and job creation/economic activity stemming from commercialization and export of products internationally.

The centre will provide students, researchers and educators with the opportunity for direct engagement in seniors care environments. It will develop new training programs and enhance gerontology content of existing programs to build a workforce better prepared for the rapidly increasing senior population. 

“Ensuring an appropriate quality-of-life for an increasing population of seniors may prove to be one of our greatest challenges in the decades to come,” said Feridun Hamdullahpur, president of the University of Waterloo. 

“Innovative collaborations like this one – marrying research and education with the daily experience of resident seniors – will help incubate programs and services that will improve that quality of life.”

Over the next 20 years, the number of seniors in Ontario will double, with the fastest growing group being those over age 80. This will put unprecedented pressure on healthcare systems serving seniors – programs that are already under strain.  

Construction on the first phase should begin in late 2012 and be completed late spring 2014. While construction is underway, faculty and staff will begin developing learning, research and innovation programs from the nearby Village of Winston Park and RIA offices in Kitchener. 

The centre of excellence will also include the Village of Winston Park, Williamsburg Town Centre and Williamsburg South in Kitchener. These locations extend the model to provide a range of research and development sites to study aging at home and broader health system issues.

About Schlegel Villages 

Twelve long-term care and retirement communities in Ontario owned and managed by Schlegel Villages will serve as accelerator centres leading to the dissemination of products and services developed through the learning, research and innovation centre. For more information, go to www.schlegelvillages.com.

About Schlegel-Waterloo Research Institute for Aging

The Schlegel-University of Waterloo Research Institute for Aging was created in 2005 as a senate-approved research institute at the University of Waterloo, then became a non-profit charitable organization in 2006 with core partnerships with University of Waterloo, Conestoga College and Schlegel Villages. The RIA conducts research aimed at enhancing the care, health and wellness of older adults in community-based and long-term care environments. The 2,500 residents living in 11 Schlegel Villages provide voluntary and vibrant living research environments and living classroom environments. The best of what is learned in these environments is disseminated broadly to benefit seniors everywhere.  For more information, go to www.the-ria.ca

About Waterloo

The University of Waterloo, located at the heart of Canada's Technology Triangle, is one of Canada's leading comprehensive universities. Waterloo is home to 30,000 full- and part-time undergraduate and graduate students who are dedicated to making the future better and brighter. Waterloo, known for the largest post- secondary co-operative education program in the world, supports enterprising partnerships in learning, research and discovery. For more information about Waterloo, visitwww.uwaterloo.ca
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Waterloo approves zoning for Schlegel Villages long-term care project
Nov 6, 2012 |  Paige Desmond | The Record | [url=http://www.therecord.com/news-story/2615781-waterloo-approves-zoning-for-schlegel-villages-long-term-care-project/]LINK




Quote:WATERLOO — Waterloo city councillors gave the thumbs up Monday to a rezoning in the city’s northwest to allow the Schlegel Villages long-term care project to go ahead.

The $160-million development will combine retirement and long-term care living with a health centre and a research centre in partnership with the University of Waterloo.

“The idea is to keep our seniors healthy longer,” Brad Schlegel said.

The 3.73-hectare (9.2-acre) site is at the northeast corner of Bearinger Road and Fischer-Hallman Road, beside the Stork Family YMCA.

It will be built in three phases and include a three-storey long-term care building, two 10-storey apartment buildings, more than 330 retirement home beds, a health centre and amenities.

Coun. Karen Scian said the long-term care beds are crucial for the community. “It’s one of the biggest challenges we face at our hospitals, is moving people out of hospital beds and into long-term care.”

Rob Trotter, city development planner, said the project improves health care in the community and makes good use of infrastructure the city has put in place for the northwest campus lands. “There’s lot of good things here happening,” he said.

Phase 1 is expected to be completed in 2014.

One level of underground parking and surface parking will be on site.

Partners include the Ontario government, Schlegel Villages, Research Institute for Aging, University of Waterloo and Conestoga College.

“It will be very profound, the changes that will come from this research,” Coun. Diane Freeman said.

Environmental activist Louisette Lanteigne said the project will be built in an environmentally sensitive area. She’s worried about water supply impacts and risks to snapping turtles in the nearby Laurel Creek and Columbia Lake areas.
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#3
June 20, 2014

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#4
Well there will be no shortage of old geezer baby boomers.   Without immigration we would be a country of  canes and walkers.     

I am ready to join the club being born in 1960. 
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#5
(10-27-2014, 04:09 PM)rickhd Wrote: Well there will be no shortage of old geezer baby boomers.   Without immigration we would be a country of  canes and walkers.
The real issue will be how eager the young folks will be to pay for our retirement accommodation and health care needs.

Quote:I am ready to join the club being born in 1960.
 
I thought so too—until I actually got the invite Sad
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#6
(10-27-2014, 04:26 PM)ookpik Wrote: The real issue will be how eager the young folks will be to pay for our retirement accommodation and health care needs.


I think you got this backwards. You will be using your hard earned retirement funds to pay young workers to take care of you and they will be happy to oblige.
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#7
There will certainly be a question of what happens to cities big and small which do not work to attract younger people, the jobs needed to employ them, and craft the cities needed to serve them. Cities that don't keep a youthful community presence will be hard hit in coming decades.
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#8
It appears that construction fencing is beginning to go up around the second phase of the project.
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#9
There has been a tower crane up on site for a while now, it can be seen from the Laurel Trail through R&T park.
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#10
The tower closest to the completed building is on its way up, moving past the second floor the last I looked.
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