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Region of Waterloo International Airport - YKF
(06-26-2017, 08:41 AM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(06-26-2017, 08:22 AM)It is mentioned in the article:SammyOES2 Wrote: "Hospital officials said Friday that will add 15 to 20 minutes to the trip but should not affect patient care."

Quotes like this drive me crazy.  It seems highly unlikely to be true, but even if it is true (say super-urgent cases are already by-passing Kitchener for a bigger trauma center in another city), nobody is going to believe it unless you add some more details.

It is mentioned in the article:


"Critically injured patients most often are transported directly from the scene by helicopter to Toronto."

But it could be more explicit.


I am surprised that the crane is a problem.  I mean, I understand it is in the current flight path, but these helicopters are able to land at the scene of serious incidents, which are likely to have navigate around similar obstructions, I am sure they can do it here, and as the article states, even did do so the first time.  I'm not a helicopter pilot, but I'm guessing this is more of a "risk management" strategy than an actual problem, basically, they're unwilling to make more difficult and riskier landings when there is a nearby airport available, and as soon as they get a different flightpath approved, they'll resume using the helipad.

I am a bit surprised that there was no lighting though, if the landing had been at night, it could possibly have been disastrous if they had not seen the crane.

I got reamed out by an EMS tech for making assumptions based on the article. Critical injuries are sent to Toronto, but pretty much any Ornge flight is going to be emergent, so it could be things like cardiac patients at imminent risk of dying being sent to St Mary's.

Transport Canada has very specific regulations about the flight paths around heliports. I'm really unclear on how the city even figures into it. The heliport operator is supposed to perform a new survey when an object is going to penetrate the obstacle limitations survey, but any company planning to erect something that will do that is supposed to notify Transport Canada and supply construction details. Pretty much anything over about 6.5 storeys at 100 Victoria St S is a problem. I was surprised to discover there is no legal requirement to add markers, just a set of voluntary regulations.

This is actually a big problem in Toronto. Sick Kids and St. Michael's have had to adjust their helicopter flight paths numerous times because of new construction, and a couple years ago they said there was basically no more room for adjustment and any further diversions would make their heliports non-functional. I'm not sure who actually officially handles the issue in Toronto though. There is a specified area around Pearson administered by the GTAA where special permits are required for construction cranes, but that only covers a small part of Toronto.
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I suspect it's more likely that patients are transferred from local hospitals in the region to other higher-level centres in Hamilton, Toronto or London.
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(06-21-2017, 08:27 AM)jgsz Wrote:
(06-20-2017, 10:17 PM)kevinchoi519 Wrote: that is great to hear. if people want a regular flight from here keep emailing them and sharing the love for YKF. The more demand they hear the more likely we get flights....

If it's not too late, emailing Jetlines about why you think YKF would be an excellent choice is a very good idea.  I have emailed them a number of times so they know there is some interest in YKF.  Because Hamilton already has a ULCC as well as other, more traditional airlines, people there may be blasé about another airline operating out of Hamilton.  If enough folks email Jetlines they will know that YKF supporters are anything but blasé. 

** THIS **

If they hear nothing from the "future consumer base", why would they select YFK?  I know I've been emailing, and I encourage everyone else to do the same!

Coke
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(06-21-2017, 11:26 AM)SammyOES2 Wrote: If they're counting on getting business from people living in or visiting Toronto - I don't see how they can possibly make it work.

I don't think there's anything coming in the next 10 years that would make me even consider recommending it as an option.  Even the eventual (and still far away) all-day 2-way GO service will have no-service periods or periods with very infrequent service.

Edit: Basically all the reasons that we're talking about why we want to use YKF over YYZ would apply to Toronto people using YKF.

I can tell you that A LOT of folks living in Toronto/Mississauga commuted to YKF to take our American Airlines flight when it was in operation.  The cheaper parking, lower (slightly) airfare were factors, but what I heard consistently is that they would collect baggage, clear Customs and drive back home in less time than it would take to even get to a Customs officer at Pearson.

The ULCC model of using smaller, outside of major centre is a tried and true model... I don't think they would have much of a problem in YFK.

Coke
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(06-26-2017, 01:07 PM)Bob_McBob Wrote: This is actually a big problem in Toronto. Sick Kids and St. Michael's have had to adjust their helicopter flight paths numerous times because of new construction, and a couple years ago they said there was basically no more room for adjustment and any further diversions would make their heliports non-functional. I'm not sure who actually officially handles the issue in Toronto though. There is a specified area around Pearson administered by the GTAA where special permits are required for construction cranes, but that only covers a small part of Toronto.

This seems weird. Airports as I understand it have well-defined flight paths around them and nearby development is restricted, in some cases severely, by the presence of the airport. I would have assumed that heliports would be the same as airports, except for presumably a different detailed shape of the restriction owing to the very different sort of traffic. I wonder what the situation is around Breslau airport? (ignoring the fact that it’s not a high-demand area for construction, so this is unlikely to be a big problem in the near future regardless)
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Subscriber-only story in the Globe about Canada Jetlines. Apparently they're still deciding between Hamilton and KW, and meeting airport executives this week.

Quote:Mr. Gadek and Canada Jetlines executive chairman Mark Morabito are in Toronto this week meeting the financial community and officials from airports in Hamilton and Kitchener-Waterloo, one of which will be chosen as what they called a "focus city" that will be the centre of operations for the carrier, including such activities as maintenance.

https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/report-...ice=mobile .
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I honestly fear that it is a given that they'll go to Hamilton for GTA resident recognition (though from the 401/407, it's actually a few kilometers less to go to YKF than Hamilton). If your Gardiner-bound GTA residents already have Porter calling them, maybe there's hope. But I almost feel like this is a formality to extract better conditions from Hamilton over. Hope I'm wrong.
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I may be cynical, but it seems to me that they're trying to pit YKF versus YHM to extract the best deal they can. Considering the chances of ULCCs succeeding longer than a year, I'm not really sure it's in either airport's best interest to subsidize their operations.
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(07-19-2017, 06:56 AM)jamincan Wrote: I may be cynical, but it seems to me that they're trying to pit YKF versus YHM to extract the best deal they can. Considering the chances of ULCCs succeeding longer than a year, I'm not really sure it's in either airport's best interest to subsidize their operations.

NewLeaf has been in Hamilton for over a year.  If nothing else, ULCCs may bring other airlines to YKF if they see the volume of traffic.  

Jetlines is still looking for feedback:

Quote:Planned Route Map

Send us your ideas on where you think we should fly, and what products and services would you like to see Jetlines offer to make your flight experience with us the best one possible.

Contact us via FacebookTwitter, or send us a message. We look forward to hearing from you.

You can also opt-in to receive our newsletter with all of the latest news on our arrival in the very near future. Click here to sign up.
We can’t wait to welcome you on board!
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(07-18-2017, 03:54 PM)taylortbb Wrote: Subscriber-only story in the Globe about Canada Jetlines. Apparently they're still deciding between Hamilton and KW, and meeting airport executives this week.

Quote:Mr. Gadek and Canada Jetlines executive chairman Mark Morabito are in Toronto this week meeting the financial community and officials from airports in Hamilton and Kitchener-Waterloo, one of which will be chosen as what they called a "focus city" that will be the centre of operations for the carrier, including such activities as maintenance.

https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/report-...ice=mobile .

Could someone cut and paste the entire article for me?

Coke
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(07-19-2017, 06:56 AM)jamincan Wrote: I may be cynical, but it seems to me that they're trying to pit YKF versus YHM to extract the best deal they can. Considering the chances of ULCCs succeeding longer than a year, I'm not really sure it's in either airport's best interest to subsidize their operations.

And hopefully the Region is on this, with the best deal that can possibly be offered.
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I think its in our interest to subsidize their operation to a point. Basically operational subsidies and no medium-long term investments just for them. But considering we're subsidizing the airport now (I think?) I don't think we need to turn a profit off of this deal. It's beneficial to the region in other ways and doesn't really cost us anything (no other good opportunities are knocking on the door right now).
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(07-19-2017, 10:09 AM)panamaniac Wrote:
(07-19-2017, 06:56 AM)jamincan Wrote: I may be cynical, but it seems to me that they're trying to pit YKF versus YHM to extract the best deal they can. Considering the chances of ULCCs succeeding longer than a year, I'm not really sure it's in either airport's best interest to subsidize their operations.

And hopefully the Region is on this, with the best deal that can possibly be offered.

Yes, hopefully the Region is working on this.  But you know, there's nothing like ordinary, potential, future users getting in touch with Jetlines and telling them what you want.   If they hear from 100 potential users in the Region of Waterloo and they get next to nothing from Hamilton then it would be difficult for them to justify going to Hamilton.
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For those of you following the airport they recently posted this.

Quote:Fantastic visit with Canada Jetlines executives to a the Region of Waterloo International Airport today! 

The Globe and Mail writes insightful piece on Canada Jetlines. Jetlines has not established fares or fees yet, but, "The whole premise of an ultra low-cost carrier is low costs; we've got to look for low costs in every aspect of the operation," says CEO Stan Gadek. "You want a base fare from A to B? Perfect, we've got that. Do you want bags? Do you want travel insurance, do you want a soda, etc? That's going to be extra and there's nothing wrong with that," says Mr. Gadek.

https://www.facebook.com/FlyYKF/posts/10155089830343611
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(07-20-2017, 02:21 PM)neonjoe Wrote: For those of you following the airport they recently posted this.

Quote:Fantastic visit with Canada Jetlines executives to a the Region of Waterloo International Airport today! 

The Globe and Mail writes insightful piece on Canada Jetlines. Jetlines has not established fares or fees yet, but, "The whole premise of an ultra low-cost carrier is low costs; we've got to look for low costs in every aspect of the operation," says CEO Stan Gadek. "You want a base fare from A to B? Perfect, we've got that. Do you want bags? Do you want travel insurance, do you want a soda, etc? That's going to be extra and there's nothing wrong with that," says Mr. Gadek.

https://www.facebook.com/FlyYKF/posts/10155089830343611

I just find this style of flying so uncivilized.
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