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Walking in Waterloo Region
(6 hours ago)Viewfromthe42 Wrote: The Toronto scrambles feature normal car/pedestrian cycles, and then a scramble for pedestrians only. I do not believe they have any vehicle-only segments.

I believe no turns are allowed at those intersections in Toronto. So when vehicle traffic has a green, pedestrians going the same direction have no conflicting vehicle movements at all. I don’t know about scrambles in other cities.

If I remember correctly, the pedestrian lights do this weird thing where they count down and go to a red hand, then turn green again for the scramble phase. They should just stay green when two consecutive green phases occur.
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(4 hours ago)KevinL Wrote: Sorry, Xiaoming, but I must disagree harshly. Overpasses and underpasses are a concession to traffic, to give up the road to the use of cars only. They place an undue burden on the pedestrian to climb the grade difference to simply get across a street, and are very unfair to anyone using wheels (whether disabled, pushing a stroller, or managing a shopping trolley).

One need only look at the abject failure of Portage and Main in Winnipeg to see how unsuccessful such a design can be.

Done right overpasses can help pedestrians. If using them is easier than staying on the surface (and not just because the surface has massive fences blocking access), they are helpful and people will use them. But that requires long ramps as somebody else pointed out, and the ramps can’t switch back and forth; they have to be part of approaching the intersection. In other locations, they can connect directly into buildings. So I don’t think it’s appropriate to characterize overpasses as always being bad for pedestrians, but clearly in many situations they are. In particular, I don’t see how it could be done at University and King without building an enormous structure. It would have to be something like a flat “ramp” from Hazel and University, then long actual ramps leading down away from the intersection on both sides of every approach — a total of 8 substantial approach structures, together with a large square, “X”, or circular structure over the intersection itself. Not feasible.
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(5 hours ago)Xiaoming Wrote: Intersections are the bottlenecks of our city roads. The speed of the throughput of the intersections restricts the speed of the entire network of city traffic. The best solution is to build overhead or underground passes for pedestrians to separate pedestrians from the traffic at the intersections.  Overhead or underground passes for pedestrians at the intersections will increase the efficiency of entire city transportation.

Xiaoming Guo, Kitchener Candidate for the School Board Trustee.

I've got to say, I couldn't disagree with you more.  There are so many issues with doing what you're saying, none more than the fact that you're saying to pedestrians, you don't matter, you're second class citizens, you have to go out of the way because cars are more important than you.
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(2 hours ago)Spokes Wrote: I've got to say, I couldn't disagree with you more.  There are so many issues with doing what you're saying, none more than the fact that you're saying to pedestrians, you don't matter, you're second class citizens, you have to go out of the way because cars are more important than you.

I don't know if I read it that way. If we are willing to commit the (significant) funding to such an endeavor; it could be said pedestrian safety is a priority.
_____________________________________
I used to be the mayor of sim city. I know what I am talking about.
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Shoot, where did I put my popcorn?
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(1 hour ago)Drake Wrote:
(2 hours ago)Spokes Wrote: I've got to say, I couldn't disagree with you more.  There are so many issues with doing what you're saying, none more than the fact that you're saying to pedestrians, you don't matter, you're second class citizens, you have to go out of the way because cars are more important than you.

I don't know if I read it that way. If we are willing to commit the (significant) funding to such an endeavor; it could be said pedestrian safety is a priority.

The intent could go either way, I think many people do believe that grade separation is a good solution--and in some cases it is.

But it is definitely the case that grade separation is an expensive last resort, when everything else has failed.  It often leads to large oppressive structures that impede pedestrians, or even more expensive oppressive structures that raise or lower cars out of the way, that while they impede pedestrians less, still breaks up the landscape.

It does work better in some places, but while University/King is a big intersection, it has limited setbacks on two sides, and is relatively urban compared with places where grade separation is more feasible (think Homer-Watson/Ottawa, which, sadly, is a ship that has already sailed).

Moreover, fixing King/University and leaving the other nearby intersections problematic doesn't help the greater problem.

I believe there are better solutions, and rethinking the entire University Ave corridor, to make it a more pedestrian friendly throughout the entire corridor, recognizing that the road serves more purposes than moving cars would be the right approach.
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