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Walking in Waterloo Region
(07-05-2017, 09:47 PM)Smore Wrote: the geometry of this intersection is awkward and for people heading west on Lodge approaching Regina, it is difficult to see left with a couple houses close to the road and a tree.  traffic on Regina is through.  I always thought the all way stop should have been here instead of at Marshall, one block south...but I guess Marshall is the higher order street?

Wow, streetview shows the line in the same spot since 2009!
https://www.google.ca/maps/@43.4741803,-...312!8i6656

Yes, and in fact the strangely wide lane makes it all the more difficult.  Frankly, the design makes things worse in almost every way.

Yeah, I doubt that line has ever moved.

This is an obvious intersection to fix, and for the time being it could be fixed with just paint and bollards, if only someone (anyone really) had the will to try.
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So final pavement is in at Mill and Ottawa, and the lanes and crosswalks are painted. But...

[Image: HPQbvBm.png]

[Image: rPFrvGJ.png]

They seem to have disregarded the (rather lengthy!) portion of curb cut (with tactile plates!) placed along Mill, and simply connected the crosswalk to the corner cut instead. This does bring the stop line much further forward; I don't know much about turn radii and those dynamics, but I presume this is for ease of vehicle movement. 

It's a bit surprising that this wasn't realized until after the concrete work was done, though.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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*slow clap*
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Is it possible that that curb cut is intended to serve as one of the entrances to the churches parking lot? If those are tactile plates, it would suggest "no", but it does correspond to where the old driveway was at that end of the Mill cut.
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(07-13-2017, 09:49 PM)panamaniac Wrote: Is it possible that that curb cut is intended to serve as one of the entrances to the churches parking lot?  If those are tactile plates, it would suggest "no", but it does correspond to where the old driveway was at that end of the Mill cut.

No, that would be too close to the intersection. It's always been further back on Mill (with another on Pattandon).
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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Google Maps shows an old entrance to the church exactly where this long curb cut is, and another further down on Mill.

Is there a risk that the placement of the long strip along the former curb cut would lead a visually impaired person to walk into traffic, if they assumed this marked the corner where they're supposed to cross? Or are the two strips in the picture different textures?
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(07-14-2017, 08:08 AM)goggolor Wrote: Google Maps shows an old entrance to the church exactly where this long curb cut is, and another further down on Mill.

Is there a risk that the placement of the long strip along the former curb cut would lead a visually impaired person to walk into traffic, if they assumed this marked the corner where they're supposed to cross? Or are the two strips in the picture different textures?

That was my recollection, having a parent who lived half a block from there.
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(07-14-2017, 08:08 AM)goggolor Wrote: Google Maps shows an old entrance to the church exactly where this long curb cut is, and another further down on Mill.

Is there a risk that the placement of the long strip along the former curb cut would lead a visually impaired person to walk into traffic, if they assumed this marked the corner where they're supposed to cross? Or are the two strips in the picture different textures?

Oh, I stand corrected, then.

I share the concern of your second paragraph. Yes, it is the same texture - clearly this was first designed to be the crossing point, but later something changed.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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If they did indeed put the crosswalk in the wrong location, (which is very likely, the current trend is crossawlks that are very set back from intersections, and always perpendicular to the road,) at least they put the crosswalk in the place where I would have crossed anyway!
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@Markster unless you were going to the bus stop which is what I interpreted the curb cut as being for.
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By the way, in that pic of the Mill/Ottawa intersection, the SUV is in the approximate location of the old wooden "bus station" that marked the terminal point of the old PUC bus route. It always intrigues me to think that, seventy years ago, this was pretty much the edge of town.
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Is the big long tactile strip in Kevin's photo perhaps something bus-stop related? ie, that's where the doors are when it stops?
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(07-15-2017, 02:10 AM)Canard Wrote: Is the big long tactile strip in Kevin's photo perhaps something bus-stop related?  ie, that's where the doors are when it stops?

No, buses stop at a regular curb, not at a curb cut.

I’m 99% sure this is just a screw-up of some sort.
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I've noticed that the intersection of King Street and Willis Way in Uptown Waterloo seems to be a "beg button" crossing (where the walk light doesn't come on unless the request button is pushed in advance). I was in Uptown on Friday and two separate occasions watched groups of people waiting to cross the street get confused when the traffic light changed but the walk signal didn't. I seem to notice this more during the day so possibly this is configured for off-peak hours only?

This has to be one of the more active pedestrian intersections in Waterloo, why can't they just assume that people will always want to cross the street there?
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Thankfully they seem to know this is an issue now.

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