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Parking in Waterloo Region
I think it's been mentioned here before, but I appreciate when a house, even one with a two-car garage/driveway, only gets one car width of curb cut. Allowing for a house to curb-cut a second width actually allows them to annex public space, by taking what was a parallel parking spot that is available to the public, and putting a driveway in its place which can only be used by the resident. If a driveway is widened but no new curb cut permitted, at least in that case no public property has been annexed.
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(06-12-2018, 09:34 AM)Viewfromthe42 Wrote: I think it's been mentioned here before, but I appreciate when a house, even one with a two-car garage/driveway, only gets one car width of curb cut. Allowing for a house to curb-cut a second width actually allows them to annex public space, by taking what was a parallel parking spot that is available to the public, and putting a driveway in its place which can only be used by the resident. If a driveway is widened but no new curb cut permitted, at least in that case no public property has been annexed.

I don't think I've ever noticed this on a new-build.  Is it common?
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In general, the Cities turn blind eyes, but they do have the right to request that homeowners reduce their driveways back to the original width. Typically, they would request that the driveway be shrunk if there was a concern for too much runoff and not enough infiltration. I also seem to recall that the neighbourhoods west of Erbsville Road have run into similar problems once families grew up and became 3-4 car families due to a lack of transit and other transportation options to get anywhere else in town, particularly for teenagers and young adults to get to school, work, and/or anything else where carpooling wasn't an option.
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(06-12-2018, 09:34 AM)Viewfromthe42 Wrote: I think it's been mentioned here before, but I appreciate when a house, even one with a two-car garage/driveway, only gets one car width of curb cut. Allowing for a house to curb-cut a second width actually allows them to annex public space, by taking what was a parallel parking spot that is available to the public, and putting a driveway in its place which can only be used by the resident. If a driveway is widened but no new curb cut permitted, at least in that case no public property has been annexed.

 I suppose there are some higher density areas where street parking is a problem (rather than parking up the block a couple spots and walking).  Who would do the curb cutting anyway, the City?
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Parking rates to increase in uptown Waterloo


Quote:The first 25 cent raise will happen in 2019, raising it from $2.75 per hour currently to $3. Monthly parking permit rates will also go up 2.5 per cent.

Council approved a 10-year forecast that will see the hourly parking rates increase by 25 cents every three years. The next rise will be in 2022, then 2025 and 2028.

Also included are 2.5-3% increases for monthly passes.
The move is to push parking to be financially self-sustaining.
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