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Parking in Waterloo Region
If parking is an important issue, the Region/Cities could mandate that all 'extra cash' spaces must be managed by a central parking authority, with gains realized as credits against property taxes.

I guess parking just isn't important, then.
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(10-30-2017, 10:39 AM)Coke6pk Wrote:
(10-30-2017, 10:32 AM)chutten Wrote: I wonder if these places with "extra cash" spaces would benefit from a service (offered by the Region or private) that managed them by reading the market landscape, providing discoverability, monitoring and waitlist services.. that sort of thing.

If the Region/Cities wanted to get into this, though, it would involve discussions around what role Parking should play around here. Is it a public good like other bits of transportation infrastructure and needs only be managed for capacity to lubricate economic activity, or is it an economic activity in itself that should be optimized for income?

I will make an assumption that these places likely don't declare this extra income, and therefore having it managed by a government wouldn't be favourable.  (My wife doesn't get receipts, and its kind of funny as she got the lots with waitlists list when she worked at CRA  LOL)

Coke

Churches don't pay income tax ... but I do expect they do provide receipts when necessary anyway, such as when a company rents a block of parking spots for its employees.
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@tomh, Yes, the churches are likely more "above board", I was referring to rental of an individual's parking space during the day.

Coke
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(10-30-2017, 10:51 AM)chutten Wrote: If parking is an important issue, the Region/Cities could mandate that all 'extra cash' spaces must be managed by a central parking authority, with gains realized as credits against property taxes.

I don't think that we really need the city to take over all parking. (what's the difference between "extra cash" parking, and a business that rents out its parking?)

We just need the city to price parking according to demand.
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A while back there was a discussion on here about a potential parking garage in the Charles St/Water St area.
An article that is talking about budgeting for such a project if required in the future is linked below :

https://www.google.ca/url?q=https://www....ARg3RVPEfT
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(11-29-2017, 03:30 PM)rangersfan Wrote: A while back there was a discussion on here about  a potential parking garage in the Charles St/Water St area.
An article that is talking about budgeting for such a project if required in the future is linked below :

https://www.google.ca/url?q=https://www....ARg3RVPEfT

I wonder why the City wouldn't add public or private parking requirement to the underground footprint of all new buildings and use the earmarked lands for future building development?
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(12-02-2017, 09:16 PM)MacBerry Wrote: I wonder why the City wouldn't add public or private parking requirement to the underground footprint of all new buildings and use the earmarked lands for future building development?

I think the basic direction is to reduce the amount of parking in each building.
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(12-02-2017, 09:26 PM)tomh009 Wrote:
(12-02-2017, 09:16 PM)MacBerry Wrote: I wonder why the City wouldn't add public or private parking requirement to the underground footprint of all new buildings and use the earmarked lands for future building development?

I think the basic direction is to reduce the amount of parking in each building.

It’s well-established in the reality based community that parking requirements are usually utterly bogus. If it is the democratic will of the people that they want to provide cheap or free parking for drivers, then they need to pony up the tax dollars to do it, not hide it in the cost of development. This could be done by doing deals with developers — there is a selling price for parking at which developers will build parking garages into their buildings. It just happens to be way above the market price of parking, mostly because the city has forced previous developers to build absurd amounts of parking, resulting in a glut and extremely low market prices for parking. So yes, it’s time to end the insanity.
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Even if the amount of per capita parking is reduced, increasing the number of people, or reasons for people to be in the area (theatres, stores, what-have-you), will mean that some level of parking will need to be included, just as other transit and transportation improvements need to be considered too. If developers can be encouraged to host a public parking structure below their building as an incentive, a major transit stop in front of their building,or a public square to bring life to the street, so be it.
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(12-04-2017, 01:23 PM)nms Wrote: Even if the amount of per capita parking is reduced, increasing the number of people, or reasons for people to be in the area (theatres, stores, what-have-you), will mean that some level of parking will need to be included, just as other transit and transportation improvements need to be considered too.  If developers can be encouraged to host a public parking structure below their building as an incentive, a major transit stop in front of their building,or a public square to bring life to the street, so be it.

Developers don’t need an incentive to install the correct amount of parking. They can figure it out from their estimate of what market pricing will support, the same as they figure out what size the bedrooms in their condo units should be and whether the countertops should be formica, granite, or quartz.
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