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Cycling in Waterloo Region
Yeah, I wanted to make a comment like that but I deleted it... my blood boils when I see them carrying around a front fork, frame, or wheel, knowing damn well it’s stolen.
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Is there an easy way to report such a sighting? Just so that when, later, someone reports bikes/parts with that description missing, the authorities will have something to go on?
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My stolen bike saga has a somewhat happy ending... a few months after my second (brand new) bike was stolen I got a call from the Cambridge police. My bike was found when they busted that giant warehouse of stolen bikes this summer. Unfortunately the thieves had already chopped it up quite a bit, but my credit card insurance paid for King St Cycles to bring it back to the original condition.

Now my bikes live indoors... even having my new bike chained to the snowblower with a Kryptonite lock wasn't enough to keep someone from stealing it.
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(01-02-2018, 09:58 PM)tomh009 Wrote: What boggles my mind is the theft of (usually front) wheels. Yes, they come off easily, and have no serial numbers, but is there really that much of a market for stolen wheels? Fairly regularly I see dodgy-looking characters riding bikes downtown with an extra wheel in one hand, and I figure it's rather unlikely that they are just carrying spare wheels around.  Sad

So many of the crappy bike racks around town encourage people to just lock up a front or back wheel unless you have a long cable or multiple u-locks (and a proper locking strategy).

For every person rolling around with a front wheel there is someone with an entire bike minus the front wheel. Get enough of each and you can reassemble many bikes. If you have ever witnessed the bike traffic at Bridgeport and Regina you've seen this in action. People with bike trailers filled with all sorts of odds and ends.
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Bike thieves steal wheels to fix other stolen bikes and they mix up all the parts at chop shops around town too. A bike without wheels is also more likely to be abandoned and will get harvested for its parts too.
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(01-03-2018, 09:38 AM)goggolor Wrote: My stolen bike saga has a somewhat happy ending... a few months after my second (brand new) bike was stolen I got a call from the Cambridge police. My bike was found when they busted that giant warehouse of stolen bikes this summer. Unfortunately the thieves had already chopped it up quite a bit, but my credit card insurance paid for King St Cycles to bring it back to the original condition.

Now my bikes live indoors... even having my new bike chained to the snowblower with a Kryptonite lock wasn't enough to keep someone from stealing it.

One question I have about big warehouse busts is how the entire inventory is handled. Obviously some of the bikes will be identified, proven to be stolen, seized, and returned to their owners if they can be found. But what about ones that can’t be individually proven to be stolen? I would hope that at some point, enough stolen property mixed into a warehouse should make the possessor of the stolen goods liable to have the entire property and its complete contents confiscated, on the theory that it is simply not believable that if, say, 10% of bikes mixed through a warehouse operated by a proven thief are stolen, the other 90% are mostly legit.

I fear that the legal system may be too lenient on crooked business enterprises. But I don’t actually know.
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Most recovered bikes are sold at the police auction In Breslau at Jutzi auctions. I went once and most of the bikes were crappy tire and Walmart bikes, many were bid up past their new price. The few high-end ones seemed to be bid up unreasonably high. I guess auction fever was running high that day.
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