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ION - Waterloo Region's Light Rail Transit
(01-09-2018, 08:57 PM)Canard Wrote:
(01-09-2018, 08:02 PM)ijmorlan Wrote: I believe I’ve seen 600km being given as a number for how far each vehicle needs to be driven for burn-in. Assuming that is correct, we need something like 20 round trips of the system--

Ima stop you right there.  Burn-in is only on the test track.

At this point wouldn't we be able to change it and just use the whole system instead of just the test track area?
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Here is the sign:
   
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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Suppose so. Sure. But I don't consider moving slowly at urban speeds much of a "burn in"... if I take a car for a test drive, I'm going to take it out on the highway, not drive it slowly around city streets and a parking lot.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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Also, I feel like a substantial portion of the testing will be waiting for tow trucks to tow vehicles parked on the tracks.
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The 600km is the minimum for burn-in; if there are any faults (failures) the odometer goes back to 0 and it is repeated until 600km of fault-free run time is achieved.

There is soooooo much testing still to do and much of it is sequential and can't run in parallel to other processes.

I would encourage those interested to read the relevant portions of the project service agreement:
Schedule 14 Commissioning
Schedule 15-2 Article 13 VTAC
Schedule 35 Vehicles
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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(01-09-2018, 09:31 PM)Pheidippides Wrote: The 600km is the minimum for burn-in; if there are any faults (failures) the odometer goes back to 0 and it is repeated until 600km of fault-free run time is achieved.

Oooooooh. Well, that changes the expected timeline, certainly.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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What is the expected timeline currently? Still "Spring 2018"?
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I think the 570 News story has a two key pieces of information that many of the people commenting on Facebook don't understand

Quote:...
Galloway says he’s glad the work will be done at the plant.


And he says it was always part of the plan to have Vehicle 1 retrofitted, and it was sent to the Region with full knowledge that it was not going to be a fully functional unit.

It was sent to the Region mostly for testing and commissioning the maintenance facility, and to start Regional Police and local fire services on rescue training.
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Yeah, 570 just had Tom on, and the theme of tbe piece was that they’re all still optimistic for spring 2018. He also mentioned that Keolis is “exatatic” with the performance and quality of the vehicles so far. This echoes the statements from Toronto regarding their Flexities (they just want more of them!).

So, that’s good!
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(01-09-2018, 08:57 PM)Canard Wrote:
(01-09-2018, 08:02 PM)ijmorlan Wrote: I believe I’ve seen 600km being given as a number for how far each vehicle needs to be driven for burn-in. Assuming that is correct, we need something like 20 round trips of the system--

Ima stop you right there.  Burn-in is only on the test track.

The point is how long does burn-in take. If it’s done only on the “test track” portion of the system, then it is more shorter round trips. The answer is still under a week, assuming no faults found. Of course this last point is the big unknown — if there are lots of faults, it could a lot of time to fix everything and have a successful burn-in.
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Did you read all of the documents that P posted?

It’s an incredibly complex procedure and takes months. Many months. You’re making this sound like it’s insignificant and that’s absolutely not the case.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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Have crews been working on clearing the guideway of snow? Sometime yesterday the line along Northfeild was clear, including the station area. Is this part of overall work or perhaps a sign of upcoming testing?
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(01-10-2018, 09:35 AM)Canard Wrote: Did you read all of the documents that P posted?

It’s an incredibly complex procedure and takes months. Many months. You’re making this sound like it’s insignificant and that’s absolutely not the case.

I’m talking about the burn-in procedure for new vehicles, not the system testing. Almost all the system testing can be done with a small number of vehicles. I believe the number is 3 according to Grandlinq.

For a new vehicle is it much more than testing that the vehicle works, including interactions with the signalling system, then running it for a few hundred kilometres to ensure it really works consistently? My point is that once the system commissioning is done, new vehicles can be added to the system in a week. Even if lots of new vehicles arrive all at once, they can be burned in simultaneously.

So burn-in, in which we operate each vehicle for an extended period of time, is not the concern; system commissioning might be, depending on exactly how long it takes. But system commissioning only needs the vehicles we currently have on site, so it should be proceeding at full speed. Then as the remaining vehicles arrive they can be burned-in, and opening should occur about a week after vehicle #12 arrives or even earlier if we decide to open with 15 minute service all the time with no enhancement in rush hour. Of course system commissioning also has to be complete for opening to occur so whether it is actually possible to open shortly after enough vehicles are on site depends on that.
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Project Agreement - Schedule 35, Appendix A, Section 3 - Burn-In Tests

Quote:3.1 Upon successful completion of the Acceptance Tests, the Vehicle shall start the Burn‐In Test to be conducted by the Region and the Vehicle Supplier, with operational support from Project Co utilizing the Test Track and any other available track.

Sounds to me that they have the option to use more than the test track for burn-in testing.

Quote:3.3 The test shall simulate revenue service, to the extent reasonably possible, and include regular cycling of doors, PA announcements, and automatic passenger announcements, PEI operation, radio communication as well as any other feature normally encountered in revenue service. Such simulation may include manual activation of certain features. In the event that the A, B, and C fault‐free continuous 600 km is not achieved the “burn‐in” will be repeated until the requirement is met.

Since Burn-In only takes place after the Acceptance Tests are completed, and Burn-In is 600km of "simulated revenue service"; seems to me that if more of the line is available or even all the line is available it could (should) be used for burn-in testing. As an engineer, the closer a simulation of real world usage is to real world usage, the better.
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I've been thinking about the comment in the record saying the next set of tests being "weather dependent" and I wonder if that has something to do with the vehicles still technically being Bombardier's and not yet handed over to the Region. There's probably some insurance clause their provider has that says you can't run/push/pull the LRV unless the tracks are dry and clear with good visibility; almost like that delay because they didn't hand over the manuals/documentation.
Everyone move to the back of the bus and we all get home faster.
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