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Boulevard Parking (Kitchener)
#31
(12-21-2018, 02:01 PM)ijmorlan Wrote: Something to think about: the privileges are granted to people with money, if they are willing to part with some of the money in order to obtain the privilege.

If there's something beyond the surface you're hoping I realize, I'm afraid it isn't happening but I would appreciate any elaboration you're willing to supply. People with money get to pick and choose which privileges they indulge in, that's kind of the point of privilege. People without money aren't afforded a choice at all.
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#32
I’ve asked this before. What is the definition of “rich people”? I have a wide boulevard but live on a street with average house prices below the national median, and by no means consider myself rich! Rich people = those that have more than me?
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#33
(12-21-2018, 04:59 PM)creative Wrote: I’ve asked this before. What is the definition of “rich people”? I have a wide boulevard but live on a street with average house prices below the national median, and by no means consider myself rich! Rich people = those that have more than me?

First of all, you're the ONLY one here to use the word "rich".

Second, I don't know what your house value is, but its very likely that you're still wealthier (the word we used) than the average person, if you own your house.  That's already an indicator of moderate wealth.

Third, even among homeowners those who have a large boulevard are likely to be wealthier on average than those who don't.  This doesn't mean there aren't counter examples, but that does not negate the trend.
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#34
(12-21-2018, 02:03 PM)ijmorlan Wrote:
(12-21-2018, 10:43 AM)timio Wrote: If you have 2 vehicles, and the allotted space allows one in the driveway and one in the garage, plus boulevard, it assumes you have a clear garage with enough space for the car.

If the garage is a dumping ground, the boulevard option becomes attractive.

Maybe those people should clean out their garage. We wouldn’t consider letting people store their garage junk on the boulevard.

Note: this is not meant to be a considered opinion. It’s just a thought that occurred to me.

Heresy!  "Stuff" is sacrosanct in modern suburbia. Smile
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#35
(12-21-2018, 02:26 PM)robdrimmie Wrote:
(12-21-2018, 02:01 PM)ijmorlan Wrote: Something to think about: the privileges are granted to people with money, if they are willing to part with some of the money in order to obtain the privilege.

If there's something beyond the surface you're hoping I realize, I'm afraid it isn't happening but I would appreciate any elaboration you're willing to supply. People with money get to pick and choose which privileges they indulge in, that's kind of the point of privilege. People without money aren't afforded a choice at all.

I just mean that we give people with money opportunities to spend it; and some of that spending can result in spreading the money around. Essentially, voluntary redistribution.

It’s unavoidable, by definition, that people with more money can buy more stuff than people with less money. If it can be arranged that some of their voluntary spending benefits everybody else, that can be a good thing.

In the case of boulevard parking, I don’t really care if some people can buy something that others cannot: that is true anyway. I think the question is whether the money received from the people paying for boulevard parking makes up for the effect on the streetscape. Same comment applies to street parking: does the money received from meters make up for the significant reduction in the public realm resulting from an entire lane being full of non-moving cars? Naively, it might appear that if the price is $0 the (non-existent) money can’t possibly be enough; but merchants may benefit from their customers having convenient parking, so even free parking may be justified in some circumstances. It’s not a simple question.
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#36
I stand corrected! “people with money”
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#37
I’ve never understood how people could have a garage but not park in it, because it’s just filled with crap. I’d do anything for a garage to store my car in (we don’t have one, just an open driveway).
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#38
(12-21-2018, 06:36 PM)creative Wrote: I stand corrected! “people with money”

I said that because I wanted to connote that I was talking about all income levels, in the general case. Sometimes the people with money are those who make $2000/month instead of $1000; other times it’s those who make $10000/month instead of $5000; sometimes it’s those who make $1000000/month instead of $100000. In the specific case of boulevard parking, we’re not talking about the richest people but more likely middle-class people of varying means.
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#39
(12-21-2018, 06:40 PM)Canard Wrote: I’ve never understood how people could have a garage but not park in it, because it’s just filled with crap. I’d do anything for a garage to store my car in (we don’t have one, just an open driveway).

It’s interesting how common this is. It seems that the preferences people use to evaluate house buying decisions are different from their preferences as actual homeowners. If builders built according to how people use their space, I think there would be a lot more storage rooms and workshops, and fewer garages. But of course they try to build according to what sells and is legal to construct.

I think a similar observation applies to apartment balconies, which I suspect are mostly not used enough to justify their cost.
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#40
I like the permit option. Permit revenues could cover enforcement to ensure that vehicles aren't overhanging the road or the sidewalk, and would force people to think about the choice, and make sure that they actually want this rather than just cleaning out the garage.

I started reading this thread opposed, but it was a good point about increasing density in the suburbs. I may not like that three adults in the house means you need three cars, but I'd rather that than more suburbs. Just don't make it free, because I want people to think twice before owning another car.

Also, make sure that each permit is good for one year, and it must be re-applied for each winter. Makes it easier to take away boulevards for cycling infrastructure.
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#41
(12-21-2018, 08:39 PM)taylortbb Wrote: I like the permit option. Permit revenues could cover enforcement to ensure that vehicles aren't overhanging the road or the sidewalk, and would force people to think about the choice, and make sure that they actually want this rather than just cleaning out the garage.

I started reading this thread opposed, but it was a good point about increasing density in the suburbs. I may not like that three adults in the house means you need three cars, but I'd rather that than more suburbs. Just don't make it free, because I want people to think twice before owning another car.

Also, make sure that each permit is good for one year, and it must be re-applied for each winter. Makes it easier to take away boulevards for cycling infrastructure.

I really think it's folly to believe that revenues from permits would even remotely pay for sufficient enforcement to make any difference and more that such a spend would even be made. Bylaw won't even effective enforce 300 meters of one bike lane in uptown.  As a solution I see them as nothing more than a way to try and placate people like me.  Basically empty platitudes. Apologies to any bylaw enforcement officers, I'm speaking from a council policy level, not an individual officer level.
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#42
(12-21-2018, 06:40 PM)Canard Wrote: I’ve never understood how people could have a garage but not park in it, because it’s just filled with crap. I’d do anything for a garage to store my car in (we don’t have one, just an open driveway).

I keep 7 bicycles and one motorcycle in the garage?
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#43
That's not crap. You are storing transportation in the garage, which is what I should have said. Smile

Perfectly acceptable. You get a star!
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#44
(12-22-2018, 09:36 AM)Canard Wrote: That's not crap.  You are storing transportation in the garage, which is what I should have said.  Smile

Perfectly acceptable.  You get a star!

Yay! This amount of transportation would have not been viable without a garage for sure.
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#45
I wish I had 7 bikes. Sad

I'm told the 3 we have now are "enough" and if I get another one, one has to go... something about storing and working on them in the kitchen over the winter doesn't sit so well with the other half... which is funny since my sister-in-law's SO keeps his motorcycles in their living room...

Does this count as Boulevard Parking?

   
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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