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End of Prohibition
#16
Local brewery preparing to release cannabis-infused beer
Quote:At the moment, you can purchase marijuana via OCS; come next October, cannabis-infused drinks including beers are expected to become legal.

Waterloo Brewing is currently preparing for that incoming legislation.

President and CEO George Croft says they're ready to take on this challenge.

"We've been mixing drinks, ready to drink ciders and beers, for an extended period of time," says Croft. "We think this is a real opportunity for our company."

The numbers for the potential revenue on this product are staggering, according to Croft.

"The belief is that it's about a $1.5 billion opportunity in Canada on an annualized basis," claims Croft. "That's just liquid infused drinks."
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#17
Has Kitchener taken a decision yet on allowing weed retail shops? I've been wondering whether there might not be a rush to open up locations on King St in DTK. That, and the university district in Waterloo, would seem to me to be the most attractive potential locations.
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#18
(12-10-2018, 10:03 AM)Spokes Wrote: Local brewery preparing to release cannabis-infused beer
Quote:At the moment, you can purchase marijuana via OCS; come next October, cannabis-infused drinks including beers are expected to become legal.

Waterloo Brewing is currently preparing for that incoming legislation. 

https://www.kitchenertoday.com/local-new...er-1153104

Health Canada has released the proposed regulations for cannabis edibles, and any combination of cannabis and alcohol is very much not allowed. Waterloo Brewing would not even be able to sell Cannabis products using their alcohol-related brand.
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#19
The article is confusing, but it seems like the path they are taking is to make non-alcoholic beer, and then put the cannabis in that. So it only tastes like beer?
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#20
(12-22-2018, 09:39 AM)Canard Wrote: The article is confusing, but it seems like the path they are taking is to make non-alcoholic beer, and then put the cannabis in that.  So it only tastes like beer?

So it does! My bad for commenting without actually reading the article.
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#21
Anybody ever try that "cool" brand beer? It's hemp flavoured and I found it to be one of the most revolting beers I've ever had. I'd rather drink OE or Faxe before that hemp flavoured stuff again... hopefully they make this stuff taste better.
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#22
(10-18-2018, 05:07 PM)ijmorlan Wrote:
(10-18-2018, 03:56 PM)Spokes Wrote: That one baffles me.

Too hard to enforce the maximum so just easier to say you can't have any?

No, they just really hate the idea of letting people make their own decisions. A trait unfortunately shared by many of our zoning professionals.

I like to think this is more around preventing unsanctioned producers and the harm that comes to property with large scale indoor grow-ops. 

I see the concern but there are probably better ways to deal with these issues more directly.  

The same is true of zoning, take parking minimums.  They aren't here to troll urbanists.  They're used to solve the very real problem of too much street parking.  Of course again there are better ways to solve these problems. (i.e., pricing street parking)
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#23
(12-23-2018, 03:27 PM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(10-18-2018, 05:07 PM)ijmorlan Wrote: No, they just really hate the idea of letting people make their own decisions. A trait unfortunately shared by many of our zoning professionals.

I like to think this is more around preventing unsanctioned producers and the harm that comes to property with large scale indoor grow-ops. 

I see the concern but there are probably better ways to deal with these issues more directly.  

The same is true of zoning, take parking minimums.  They aren't here to troll urbanists.  They're used to solve the very real problem of too much street parking.  Of course again there are better ways to solve these problems. (i.e., pricing street parking)

Your points are well taken. At the same time, however, I think I have identified a systemic problem within the regulatory community, if I may call it that.

I have heard of discussions involving possibly replacing parking minima with parking maxima. Basically the idea is that people have noticed that parking minima lead to excessive investment in parking. So what should the replacement, more urban-supportive rule be? Why, parking maxima of course! It doesn’t occur to them that just repealing the rule would be more appropriate; there always has to be a rule. In this specific case, it’s absurd to go directly from parking minima to parking maxima. Essentially one is just swapping what is allowed and not allowed, with the possible exception of an overlap which either remains allowed or not allowed depending on the specifics. Implicitly, it’s an admission that they were doing completely the wrong thing before, but without the appropriate markers of humility and contrition for screwing up so badly.

Going back to the marijuana issue, while I do understand that we don’t want people running large operations out of a residential property, it’s so basic to personal freedom to be able to do things for oneself that outlawing personal cultivation entirely is obviously wrong, and administrative convenience can’t override the basic requirement that people be left alone to live their lives as they see fit. There can be a reasonable discussion around the exact limit (4 plants? 8 plants? a floor space limit? some other way of calculating the limit?), but I don’t think there can be a reasonable discussion around whether personal cultivation should be allowed at all, just as the specifics of marijuana do not allow for a reasonable argument for prohibition, especially in light of the historical evidence around both alcohol and drug prohibition.

While people who call themselves libertarians usually have some pretty wacky views, I think they have something important to tell us about the role of government, which by default should be none in any particular situation. Government should only get involved when it needs to; if rights conflict, for example, or if more injustice will result from staying out than from going in, or if certain services are best provided by government, or for other good reasons (I don’t have a codified list). I believe, contra the typical libertarian, that there are actually many many situations in which government should be involved. But not all, and certainly not as many as people who work for the regulatory state seem to believe.
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#24
Retail cannabis: The $15-million question

Quote:Waterloo Region's municipalities have just two weeks left to decide if they want to ban legal cannabis shops from their communities.

After Jan. 22, any municipality that has not opted out of having private cannabis storefronts could get them by default. More than a dozen municipalities across the province have already told the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario (AGCO) they want no part in walk-in marijuana stores.

Locally, Waterloo Region's municipalities are officially still undecided — although most appear to be leaning in favour of allowing the stores, while two rural townships say they're not so sure.

Quote:
The Township of Wellesley will be the first municipality in the region to weigh the cannabis shop question. The township's council is scheduled to debate the issue Tuesday night, with municipal staff recommending they vote in favour.

Quote:
The mayors of Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge all support legal cannabis storefronts, and it's expected their councils will choose to allow pot shops. All three have framed the debate as an issue of public safety and restricting the black market.
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#25
Anyone leaning one way or the other on this one?
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#26
I would be fairly upset if any of the cities blocked retail stores. It’s absurdly easy to get marijuana products online and blocking physical retail is a weird kind of morality that’s repeatedly been proven to be worse for people. Also for selfish reasons, though I expect to make the bulk of my purchases online as it’s really convenient.
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#27
(01-08-2019, 11:10 AM)robdrimmie Wrote: I would be fairly upset if any of the cities blocked retail stores. It’s absurdly easy to get marijuana products online and blocking physical retail is a weird kind of morality that’s repeatedly been proven to be worse for people. Also for selfish reasons, though I expect to make the bulk of my purchases online as it’s really convenient.

I would also support retail.  There's no reason to block it.

Also, I'm concerned with the online store, given the way it's treated internationally, specifically in the US, and given that we have already had a data breach, I sure as heck wouldn't trust OCS with my data.
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#28
Maybe a bit of a side-skew question, but it just occurred to me... What about poppers? Why are they still illegal, if pot is legal now?
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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#29
(01-08-2019, 10:47 PM)Canard Wrote: Maybe a bit of a side-skew question, but it just occurred to me... What about poppers?  Why are they still illegal, if pot is legal now?

Afaik, possession/consumption of "poppers" is not illegal in Canada, although its sale is prohibited by Health Canada (when sales are discovered).  The recent legalization of cannabis related exclusively to weed, so no change re poppers.
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#30
Oh wow, I had no idea. I thought they made them completely illegal several years ago. Thanks!
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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