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Uptown Public Realm Strategy
#31
(09-28-2018, 10:44 PM)Pheidippides Wrote: My understanding is similar to megabytephreak's but in addition that the pumping station is a heritage property.

So between the infrastructure and heritage limitations there isn't much left to do with the space other than green space/park.

Maybe turn in to some fancy restaurant surrounded by green space?

Last I heard, the Region wanted to convert the pumping station building into a makers space/mini community centre/cafe surrounded by a park. This would be a pretty ideal re-use in my opinion!
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#32
Plans to improve uptown Waterloo outdoor spaces may take time
Quote:Waterloo council has approved three key proposals to improve outdoor spaces in the uptown, while warning the unfunded projects won't happen right away.
...
Three proposals, applauded by the public and uptown businesses during consultations, would:

• Enhance and expand the Laurel Greenway, turning it into a linear park and creating a continuous green space that cuts across the middle of the uptown.

• Turn Willis Way into a one-way street with a design that puts people first, connects better to parks at both ends and allows the street to close to traffic for special events.

• Develop a Civic Common — described as an extended front lawn for the uptown — around the historic waterworks and underused parks in the area of William and King streets.
...
Steps to improve the Laurel Greenway would include securing a 30-metre stretch of land centred on the Laurel Trail. The proposal is to put playgrounds, plazas and lawns along its edge while transforming the flood plain into a more durable park.

The enhanced greenway would have more trees and consistent way-finding as well as drinking fountains, receptacles, seating, and marked and protected crosswalks at major roads. Artists would be invited to stage temporary installations or events within the greenway.

Redeveloping Willis Way would make it more inviting for pedestrians while better connecting it to Cenotaph Park, an underused space that's hidden away at one end.

The street would close to cars at times for public events. The idea is to make it a continuous public space that is contemplative, but also a place for lively shopping.

The Civic Common would connect to the Ion rail transit station at King and Allen streets. It would become a gateway, stressing nature and resilience and showcasing the boundaries of the original town square.
https://www.therecord.com/news-story/920...take-time/
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#33
Why not just close Willis Way entirely?
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#34
That's what I was thinking. I typically think one way streets are dumb, so there's some bias there.
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#35
In trying to figure out which one way is the right way if you were to remove one direction from Willis Way, I had to also ask myself what purpose this street serves. I think most of its raison d'être is access to parking.

But also, reading the document, I don't see where it recommends making Willis Way into a one-way street. It calls it a "shared street". There is "consideration ... as a potential candidate for one way movement in the up-coming Transportation Master Plan Update". So I think the reporting jumps the gun on this issue.
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#36
(03-07-2019, 11:43 AM)Spokes Wrote: That's what I was thinking.  I typically think one way streets are dumb, so there's some bias there.

One way streets can be both helpful, and problematic, they can be helpful in allowing the city to fit vehicle access in places without enough room for two way traffic, as well as using direction restrictions to prevent rat running through neighbourhoods.

However, they can also be used to create urban highways through our downtown core.

This looks like it would be the former.
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#37
(03-07-2019, 11:57 AM)timc Wrote: In trying to figure out which one way is the right way if you were to remove one direction from Willis Way, I had to also ask myself what purpose this street serves. I think most of its raison d'être is access to parking.

But also, reading the document, I don't see where it recommends making Willis Way into a one-way street. It calls it a "shared street". There is "consideration ... as a potential candidate for one way movement in the up-coming Transportation Master Plan Update". So I think the reporting jumps the gun on this issue.

It could have been mentioned verbally in the presentation.  Although a shared street would tend to contradict the idea of one-way traffic, as restricting to one-way would give plenty of space not to share the street.
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#38
(03-07-2019, 12:11 PM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(03-07-2019, 11:43 AM)Spokes Wrote: That's what I was thinking.  I typically think one way streets are dumb, so there's some bias there.

One way streets can be both helpful, and problematic, they can be helpful in allowing the city to fit vehicle access in places without enough room for two way traffic, as well as using direction restrictions to prevent rat running through neighbourhoods.

However, they can also be used to create urban highways through our downtown core.

This looks like it would be the former.

Well said. Even for major traffic routes, one-way streets can have a green wave at whatever speed is considered acceptable, and can be designed so travelling consistently faster is impossible without running red lights. The problem is not really with the streets, but with the planners — if they want to build a highway through town, they can design the street for that; and if they want to build access to destinations within the area at reasonable pedestrian-compatible speeds, they can design the street for that.

As to the hypothetical direction of Willis Way, I think westbound would be what is wanted. Erb, the next street north, is eastbound. Giving up one motor vehicle lane for pedestrians and bicyclists would make a lot of sense.
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#39
Does this proposal include all of Willis Way, or just the part between King and Caroline? I suspect that the King to Regina stretch would always need car access since it serves as the entrance to the City Parkade, the delivery lanes between King and Regina, and possibly the new parking structure for the proposed new building there.
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#40
(03-11-2019, 11:31 AM)nms Wrote: Does this proposal include all of Willis Way, or just the part between King and Caroline? I suspect that the King to Regina stretch would always need car access since it serves as the entrance to the City Parkade, the delivery lanes between King and Regina, and possibly the new parking structure for the proposed new building there.

None of the proposal involves closing Willis Way to cars at all.
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#41
The article proposes that (as quoted earlier in this thread), "The street would close to cars at times for public events," with the implication of connecting the Cenotaph green with the Civic Square.
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#42
I can't even imagine there's much vehicular traffic on that part of the street
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#43
(03-20-2019, 06:54 AM)Spokes Wrote: I can't even imagine there's much vehicular traffic on that part of the street

Unless cars are trying to get into the Parkade. I don't think that there is an entrance off of Regina.
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#44
(03-07-2019, 12:11 PM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(03-07-2019, 11:43 AM)Spokes Wrote: That's what I was thinking.  I typically think one way streets are dumb, so there's some bias there.

One way streets can be both helpful, and problematic, they can be helpful in allowing the city to fit vehicle access in places without enough room for two way traffic, as well as using direction restrictions to prevent rat running through neighbourhoods.

However, they can also be used to create urban highways through our downtown core.

This looks like it would be the former.

Yes! When I lived in Hamilton it was amazing how fast you could get from one end of Hamilton (especially West to East) to the other end, when you were down the mountain. Quite often you could hit every green light until the two one-way streets merged.
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