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Grand River Transit
Having rode the iXpress last week and yesterday from Pinebush to R&T Park and back, I'll confirm that the wonkiest/slowest part of the route is between the downtown terminal and the hospital.  It seemingly made no sense whatsoever.

What bugged me the most though was that the rear emergency roof hatch was open on every single one of them.  Whenever it got up to speed the air turbulence started bringing diesel exhaust in, and being a good little boy who always moves to the back I was right there to breathe it in and get a massive headache.  To add insult to injury, the rain was coming in through it yesterday morning as well and dripping on unsuspecting passengers from time to time.  Is there some policy that they keep that hatch open, or does some fellow passenger that wants a little more air keep popping it open?  Wouldn't it raise an alarm at the driver's console?  Aren't they all air conditioned now and so wouldn't need this for ventilation?
...K
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(05-16-2018, 09:56 AM)KevinT Wrote: Having rode the iXpress last week and yesterday from Pinebush to R&T Park and back, I'll confirm that the wonkiest/slowest part of the route is between the downtown terminal and the hospital.  It seemingly made no sense whatsoever.

What bugged me the most though was that the rear emergency roof hatch was open on every single one of them.  Whenever it got up to speed the air turbulence started bringing diesel exhaust in, and being a good little boy who always moves to the back I was right there to breathe it in and get a massive headache.  To add insult to injury, the rain was coming in through it yesterday morning as well and dripping on unsuspecting passengers from time to time.  Is there some policy that they keep that hatch open, or does some fellow passenger that wants a little more air keep popping it open?  Wouldn't it raise an alarm at the driver's console?  Aren't they all air conditioned now and so wouldn't need this for ventilation?

They have a mechanical thing that turns it into a vent.
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It's often used to save having to turn on the A/C. If it starts to rain while it's open, though, then it's a bit more troublesome.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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It would only potentially flag an alarm if you actually physically opened the hatch completely, I think... They have four little cartridge cylinders arranged in a bistable arrangement that let you pop it open in three possible configurations (leading edge, trailing edge, or parallel - straight up) for ventalation. You being a mechanical guy too though I'm sure already figured that out on your ride. Smile
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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I finally saw one of the ION buses by Northfield and Davenport the other day, which I suppose must have been the 202. Those bright white route signs certainly make the buses stand out.
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As far as I'm concerned, they should at a minimum change all the ixpress routes to that style
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I see them all the time in Cambridge - they must have a lot of them.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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(05-16-2018, 06:58 PM)Canard Wrote: I see them all the time in Cambridge - they must have a lot of them.

there's 9 of them. They haven't had more than 6 in service at any given time
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(05-16-2018, 06:58 PM)Canard Wrote: I see them all the time in Cambridge - they must have a lot of them.

You would see them most often there, as they're based out of the Cambridge garage.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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I hope that the Region/GRT will slowly start introducing electric buses to the fleet. I think there are a number of ideal locations where on-route charging stations can be located (Conestoga Mall, UW's new terminal, Fairview Mall, Ira Needles terminal).
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BYD K9 has a 250 km range; fast charging takes three hours. New Flyer Xcelsior can do 400 km. How much distance do GRT buses drive in one day?
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Just got a email on the easy go card, they are now trialing group fares, where one cash equivalent card can pay for up to 9 people, and day passes that can be loaded on the card.
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I was in Mississauga recently, and one thing that stood out to me is that several of the bus stops have concrete sections of road in front of them (what they call "bus landing pads") instead of asphalt. If you've ever biked near a bus stop, you will notice that the asphalt gets torn up pretty badly by buses, and concrete is a more durable surface. Is this something that we should consider here in Waterloo Region?
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(05-18-2018, 03:36 PM)timc Wrote: I was in Mississauga recently, and one thing that stood out to me is that several of the bus stops have concrete sections of road in front of them (what they call "bus landing pads") instead of asphalt. If you've ever biked near a bus stop, you will notice that the asphalt gets torn up pretty badly by buses, and concrete is a more durable surface. Is this something that we should consider here in Waterloo Region?

When I was there, I thought most of those were actually bus bays.  It's a good idea (you'll see the terminal is partially paved in concrete I believe for that reason) but I am guessing they are difficult to implement in the actual roadway, because the interface between concrete and asphalt will probably degrade and get potholes.  Asphalt only designs usually leaves potholes primarily in the bike lanes, or otherwise in the gutter.

As for bus bays themselves, there are pluses and minuses, the pluses are for drivers and transit operations, the minuses are largely for transit users.
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(05-18-2018, 03:36 PM)timc Wrote: I was in Mississauga recently, and one thing that stood out to me is that several of the bus stops have concrete sections of road in front of them (what they call "bus landing pads") instead of asphalt. If you've ever biked near a bus stop, you will notice that the asphalt gets torn up pretty badly by buses, and concrete is a more durable surface. Is this something that we should consider here in Waterloo Region?

We do have these at terminals. Not sure how worthwhile they are for regular stops; maybe in future for ones near Ion stations with heavy usage?
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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