Welcome Guest!
In order to take advantage of all the great features that Waterloo Region Connected has to offer, including participating in the lively discussions below, you're going to have to register. The good news is that it'll take less than a minute and you can get started enjoying Waterloo Region's best online community right away.
or Create an Account




Thread Rating:
  • 3 Vote(s) - 4.67 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Grand River Transit
It's often used to save having to turn on the A/C. If it starts to rain while it's open, though, then it's a bit more troublesome.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
Reply


It would only potentially flag an alarm if you actually physically opened the hatch completely, I think... They have four little cartridge cylinders arranged in a bistable arrangement that let you pop it open in three possible configurations (leading edge, trailing edge, or parallel - straight up) for ventalation. You being a mechanical guy too though I'm sure already figured that out on your ride. Smile
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
Reply
I finally saw one of the ION buses by Northfield and Davenport the other day, which I suppose must have been the 202. Those bright white route signs certainly make the buses stand out.
Reply
As far as I'm concerned, they should at a minimum change all the ixpress routes to that style
Reply
I see them all the time in Cambridge - they must have a lot of them.
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
Reply
(05-16-2018, 07:58 PM)Canard Wrote: I see them all the time in Cambridge - they must have a lot of them.

there's 9 of them. They haven't had more than 6 in service at any given time
Reply
(05-16-2018, 07:58 PM)Canard Wrote: I see them all the time in Cambridge - they must have a lot of them.

You would see them most often there, as they're based out of the Cambridge garage.
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
Reply
I hope that the Region/GRT will slowly start introducing electric buses to the fleet. I think there are a number of ideal locations where on-route charging stations can be located (Conestoga Mall, UW's new terminal, Fairview Mall, Ira Needles terminal).
Reply
BYD K9 has a 250 km range; fast charging takes three hours. New Flyer Xcelsior can do 400 km. How much distance do GRT buses drive in one day?
Reply
Just got a email on the easy go card, they are now trialing group fares, where one cash equivalent card can pay for up to 9 people, and day passes that can be loaded on the card.
Reply
I was in Mississauga recently, and one thing that stood out to me is that several of the bus stops have concrete sections of road in front of them (what they call "bus landing pads") instead of asphalt. If you've ever biked near a bus stop, you will notice that the asphalt gets torn up pretty badly by buses, and concrete is a more durable surface. Is this something that we should consider here in Waterloo Region?
Reply
(05-18-2018, 04:36 PM)timc Wrote: I was in Mississauga recently, and one thing that stood out to me is that several of the bus stops have concrete sections of road in front of them (what they call "bus landing pads") instead of asphalt. If you've ever biked near a bus stop, you will notice that the asphalt gets torn up pretty badly by buses, and concrete is a more durable surface. Is this something that we should consider here in Waterloo Region?

When I was there, I thought most of those were actually bus bays.  It's a good idea (you'll see the terminal is partially paved in concrete I believe for that reason) but I am guessing they are difficult to implement in the actual roadway, because the interface between concrete and asphalt will probably degrade and get potholes.  Asphalt only designs usually leaves potholes primarily in the bike lanes, or otherwise in the gutter.

As for bus bays themselves, there are pluses and minuses, the pluses are for drivers and transit operations, the minuses are largely for transit users.
Reply
(05-18-2018, 04:36 PM)timc Wrote: I was in Mississauga recently, and one thing that stood out to me is that several of the bus stops have concrete sections of road in front of them (what they call "bus landing pads") instead of asphalt. If you've ever biked near a bus stop, you will notice that the asphalt gets torn up pretty badly by buses, and concrete is a more durable surface. Is this something that we should consider here in Waterloo Region?

We do have these at terminals. Not sure how worthwhile they are for regular stops; maybe in future for ones near Ion stations with heavy usage?
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
Reply
The trick is to put the concrete under the asphalt so it’s supported better. I think the problem is braking busses push asphalt around. There’s a bad one on Lexington near Bridge street.
Reply
(05-20-2018, 03:23 PM)clasher Wrote: The trick is to put the concrete under the asphalt so it’s supported better. I think the problem is braking busses push asphalt around. There’s a bad one on Lexington near Bridge street.

Yeah, I've see a few on University East, and there's a pretty bad one at Hagey and Columbia. I can't remember where I've seen others, but it's really annoying when there is this smushed asphalt taking up the bike lane in front of the bus stop.
Reply
« Next Oldest | Next Newest »



Possibly Related Threads...
  Grand River Transit Fantasy westwardloo 35 19,268 07-17-2017, 04:22 PM
Last Post: Coke6pk

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 5 Guest(s)

About Waterloo Region Connected

Launched in August 2014, Waterloo Region Connected is an online community that brings together all the things that make Waterloo Region great. Waterloo Region Connected provides user-driven content fueled by a lively discussion forum covering topics like urban development, transportation projects, heritage issues, businesses and other issues of interest to those in Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge and the four Townships - North Dumfries, Wellesley, Wilmot, and Woolwich.

              User Links