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GO Transit
(03-06-2019, 08:12 AM)timio Wrote: I was thinking quick wins in terms of feasible grade separations.

Closures might be ok in Guelph where there are many crossings in a short distance.

Yes, but … in the countryside, where crossings are further apart, eliminating (or grade-separating) a crossing may improve the speed substantially. In a city, if there are three crossings within 500m, if you eliminate the middle one, it doesn't help as the train will have to go slow for the other two anyway.

Adding gates to the remaining uncontrolled crossings might help, too. I don't know enough detail about rail safety, though.
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The town hall, in full:

My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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(03-06-2019, 02:45 PM)tomh009 Wrote:
(03-06-2019, 08:12 AM)timio Wrote: I was thinking quick wins in terms of feasible grade separations.

Closures might be ok in Guelph where there are many crossings in a short distance.

Yes, but … in the countryside, where crossings are further apart, eliminating (or grade-separating) a crossing may improve the speed substantially. In a city, if there are three crossings within 500m, if you eliminate the middle one, it doesn't help as the train will have to go slow for the other two anyway.

Adding gates to the remaining uncontrolled crossings might help, too. I don't know enough detail about rail safety, though.

I did ask this already, but I'm still curious, I was under the impression trains were not slowing for crossings at all?  What is the speed limit through level crossings for trains, compared with the top speed of GO Trains?
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(03-06-2019, 04:58 PM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(03-06-2019, 02:45 PM)tomh009 Wrote: Yes, but … in the countryside, where crossings are further apart, eliminating (or grade-separating) a crossing may improve the speed substantially. In a city, if there are three crossings within 500m, if you eliminate the middle one, it doesn't help as the train will have to go slow for the other two anyway.

Adding gates to the remaining uncontrolled crossings might help, too. I don't know enough detail about rail safety, though.

I did ask this already, but I'm still curious, I was under the impression trains were not slowing for crossings at all?  What is the speed limit through level crossings for trains, compared with the top speed of GO Trains?

I think we need @Canard or @trainspotter139 to answer this question. My attempts at searching the Internet for answers were not successful.
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Pretty sure we're the same as the US, where gated grade crossings can be used through Class 6 — max 177 km/h, which is faster than GO will move within our lifetimes.
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(03-06-2019, 06:50 PM)kps Wrote: Pretty sure we're the same as the US, where gated grade crossings can be used through Class 6 — max 177 km/h, which is faster than GO will move within our lifetimes.

Thanks for the clarification. Do you know the speeds for with no gates and bells, and with no bells?
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(03-06-2019, 07:43 PM)danbrotherston Wrote:
(03-06-2019, 06:50 PM)kps Wrote: Pretty sure we're the same as the US, where gated grade crossings can be used through Class 6 — max 177 km/h, which is faster than GO will move within our lifetimes.

Thanks for the clarification. Do you know the speeds for with no gates and bells, and with no bells?

Here's a US reference. It seems they now require gates at all crossings running passenger trains.

The only thing I've found for Canada is this which forbids new level crossings where the railway can exceed 177km/h.
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