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Kitchener Fence by-law
#31
(07-02-2018, 10:01 PM)tomh009 Wrote:
(07-02-2018, 07:17 PM)clasher Wrote: An imperial pint is 20 imperial ounces, so 568ml and 20 US ounces is 591ml which is why pop comes in that size.

Exactly. US pints have only 16 (fluid) ounces.

And to make matters worse pints aren't legal units in Canada so bars can serve whatever they want... I like the European approach with marked glasses and allowance for head. The UK glasses all have the pint marks with the inspector number on them which is kind of neat.
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#32
(07-02-2018, 10:56 PM)clasher Wrote:
(07-02-2018, 10:01 PM)tomh009 Wrote: Exactly. US pints have only 16 (fluid) ounces.

And to make matters worse pints aren't legal units in Canada so bars can serve whatever they want... I like the European approach with marked glasses and allowance for head. The UK glasses all have the pint marks with the inspector number on them which is kind of neat.

Pints are legal in Canada and covered under the Fairness at the Pumps Act.

More here: https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2017/01/17...25182.html

From the Government of Canada website: (you have to pick beer as your complaint)
https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/mc-mc.nsf/...00007.html


Pints of draft beer
Consider the following:

A pint contains 20 fluid ounces (568 millilitres) in Canada.
The limit of error for 20 fluid ounces is 0.5 fluid ounces (15 millilitres).
The foam (head) is not included in the measurement.
What you need before you start In order to process your complaint, we will require:
-your name and contact information
-the name and address of the establishment
-information on how you have attempted to resolve the matter
-a photo of the menu or advertisement showing the quantity claimed to have been dispensed, if possible
-the sales receipt, if you have it
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#33
Cool! I quit drinking before they made that law so I wasn't aware. I can't imagine many people file complaints.
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#34
(07-01-2018, 08:58 AM)Canard Wrote:  I’m not American. There’s no discussion here.

Since we are airing our pet peeves, I will voice this one.  Unless you are a citizen of a country in Asia, Europe, Africa, Austrailia or Antartica... you ARE an American. 

Everyone who identifies themselves as American on documentation provided to me gets it returned and told to put the country of which they are a citizen.  America is not a country.  United States is not a country [If our friends to the south in Mexico claimed to be US citizens, they would be telling the truth!].  USA or United States of America IS a country.... it shouldn't go by any other name.

I HATE (Strong word, I know) when one country claims the name of two continents as their own.  A citizen of the USA calling themselves American is like someone walking on train tracks! Smile

Coke
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#35
Canadians will generally avoid referring to the USA as "America" (unlike the Brits), but "American", either as an adjective or referring to a citizen of the USA, is pretty much common usage ("United States" can work as an adjective, but "USA" not so much).. You are of course correct that there is no country called "America", but no need to fetishize it, istm, since there is seldom if ever any confusion as to meaning. By the way, for our American cousins from south of the USA, it's one continent, not two. On the other hand, the Spanish-speaking world often calls the USA "Norteamerica", which leaves me wishing they used "America".
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#36
(07-04-2018, 09:13 AM)Coke6pk Wrote:
(07-01-2018, 08:58 AM)Canard Wrote:  I’m not American. There’s no discussion here.

Since we are airing our pet peeves, I will voice this one.  Unless you are a citizen of a country in Asia, Europe, Africa, Austrailia or Antartica... you ARE an American. 

Contrarily, your position is one of my peeves. Americans have claimed the term for their own. Technically you are right, however English is a growing and changing language (unlike France French, which by comparison is very much set in stone) and the original definition is less important than common usage.

"American" = "Identifies as a Resident of the United States of America". They get the word.

I am of the opinion that we need to be specific about our continent (e.g. North American or South American) to identify as residents of either geographic lump.
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#37
(07-04-2018, 09:13 AM)Coke6pk Wrote:
(07-01-2018, 08:58 AM)Canard Wrote:  I’m not American. There’s no discussion here.

Since we are airing our pet peeves, I will voice this one.  Unless you are a citizen of a country in Asia, Europe, Africa, Austrailia or Antartica... you ARE an American. 

Everyone who identifies themselves as American on documentation provided to me gets it returned and told to put the country of which they are a citizen.  America is not a country.  United States is not a country [If our friends to the south in Mexico claimed to be US citizens, they would be telling the truth!].  USA or United States of America IS a country.... it shouldn't go by any other name.

I HATE (Strong word, I know) when one country claims the name of two continents as their own.  A citizen of the USA calling themselves American is like someone walking on train tracks! Smile

Coke

Now you sound like my dad! Wink
For daily ion construction updates, photos and general urban rail news, follow me on twitter! @Canardiain
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