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Waterloo Region Council Election Discussion
(08-17-2018, 08:58 AM)Viewfromthe42 Wrote:
(08-16-2018, 10:15 PM)Pheidippides Wrote: Interesting that Aissa ($247,729.36) outspent Seiling ($60,301.55), more than 4:1 last time (final vote was 25,611 for Aissa to 63,884 for Seiling).

No, interesting is that if you look at his filings, virtually all of that came out of his pocket, no donations. Mind you, when you're championing an agenda that creates sprawl and enriches greenfield developers, and you run a fencing business that benefits from same, it's very easy for a lot of financial flows to appear more normal.

That’s actually a very interesting angle. Isn’t there a conflict of interest between his business building the stuff that is needed in large quantities for only some planning strategies, and his possible role in guiding the planning used by the Region? He might have to recuse himself from just about everything.
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I promise you if that were to be brought against him, lawyers' fees would magically appear and be endless in his favour Big Grin
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The advertising and name recognition alone for his business probably exceeded the $247k.
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There is a narrative growing about the two hospitals being too close to each other and too difficult to access throughout the region. I first encountered it from Mike Litt's controversial (mostly due to statements about the arts community) Globe and Mail article.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business...loos-tech/
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(08-19-2018, 02:44 PM)robdrimmie Wrote: There is a narrative growing about the two hospitals being too close to each other and too difficult to access throughout the region. I first encountered it from Mike Litt's controversial (mostly due to statements about the arts community) Globe and Mail article.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business...loos-tech/

He did propose specifically a teaching hospital, though. And in the context of making this a world-class city, similar to the provision of high-speed rail, so I take both of those as worthy long-term objectives.

Aissa wants to make an election issue out of that, though. In spite of the fact that the region has no power to establish a new hospital.
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(08-19-2018, 06:39 PM)tomh009 Wrote: He did propose specifically a teaching hospital, though. And in the context of making this a world-class city, similar to the provision of high-speed rail, so I take both of those as worthy long-term objectives.

Aissa wants to make an election issue out of that, though. In spite of the fact that the region has no power to establish a new hospital.

I'm in complete agreement. I think Aissa is likely pandering to Litt's audience by touching on the topic, and generally folks (I include myself here) don't have very clear understanding of whose responsibility such a thing would be. Aissa gets to say it will be a focus of his and there's a lot of people outside of Kitchener and Waterloo who would very reasonably think "yeah, another hospital with ready access for the townships would be great!"
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(08-20-2018, 08:57 AM)robdrimmie Wrote:
(08-19-2018, 06:39 PM)tomh009 Wrote: He did propose specifically a teaching hospital, though. And in the context of making this a world-class city, similar to the provision of high-speed rail, so I take both of those as worthy long-term objectives.

Aissa wants to make an election issue out of that, though. In spite of the fact that the region has no power to establish a new hospital.

I'm in complete agreement. I think Aissa is likely pandering to Litt's audience by touching on the topic, and generally folks (I include myself here) don't have very clear understanding of whose responsibility such a thing would be. Aissa gets to say it will be a focus of his and there's a lot of people outside of Kitchener and Waterloo who would very reasonably think "yeah, another hospital with ready access for the townships would be great!"

A number of years ago I had lunch with UW President David Johnson and Vice President Amit Chakma and Johnson told me that he really wanted to see a teaching hospital in KW.  He thought it would fit in well between St. Mary's and Grand River Hospital.  He mentioned that several key ingredients were already in place, namely the School of Pharmacy, along with a branch of the School of Optometry and the Centre for Family Medicine.  Plus, Conestoga College has a nursing school.   The area around the School of Pharmacy has changed a lot since then so if KW got a teaching hospital I don't know where it would be built.  I suppose the old Uniroyal factory on Strange Street may be a possibility.
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It’s one of those issues where the idea itself may have merit, but it needs to be championed by people who have some idea what they are doing. I’m certainly not opposed to a teaching hospital, and it may be a great idea. But the notion that somebody will be elected Regional Chair on a platform of opening such a hospital and will then go and do it is ridiculous. A serious Chair would support the studies and background needed to make it happen and work with the levels of government and other supporters who would actually do it. And would certainly not stir up resentment against the current set of hospitals.
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I agree.
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What in the world do they mean about building a teaching hospital? All of the local hospitals are already teaching hospitals in some capacity. If a medical school were to open here, they would take on that role in an even greater capacity.
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(08-20-2018, 01:20 PM)jgsz Wrote:
(08-20-2018, 08:57 AM)robdrimmie Wrote: I'm in complete agreement. I think Aissa is likely pandering to Litt's audience by touching on the topic, and generally folks (I include myself here) don't have very clear understanding of whose responsibility such a thing would be. Aissa gets to say it will be a focus of his and there's a lot of people outside of Kitchener and Waterloo who would very reasonably think "yeah, another hospital with ready access for the townships would be great!"

A number of years ago I had lunch with UW President David Johnson and Vice President Amit Chakma and Johnson told me that he really wanted to see a teaching hospital in KW.  He thought it would fit in well between St. Mary's and Grand River Hospital.  He mentioned that several key ingredients were already in place, namely the School of Pharmacy, along with a branch of the School of Optometry and the Centre for Family Medicine.  Plus, Conestoga College has a nursing school.   The area around the School of Pharmacy has changed a lot since then so if KW got a teaching hospital I don't know where it would be built.  I suppose the old Uniroyal factory on Strange Street may be a possibility.

I believe the uWaterloo (although it may be the City of Kitchener) owns the vacant land beside the School of Pharmacy. which could be the place to build the teaching building/hospital site for a Waterloo Region teaching hospital. Like St. Mike's in Toronto there is the opportunity to build the hospital up (a vertical hospital) on the King-Victoria location.  

The other option, I suggested, awhile back, was that a deal could be brokered with SunLife to build a new teaching hospital building that would take over the exterior ground parking for SunLife employees. It would be on King Street with two LRT stops available and make much better use of a parking lot. Underground parking, for both the teaching hospital and SunLife, could be part of the design build.
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CBC had each candidate for Chair answer a five-question survey.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener...-1.4807139
My Twitter: @KevinLMaps
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(09-01-2018, 09:15 AM)KevinL Wrote: CBC had each candidate for Chair answer a five-question survey.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener...-1.4807139

Thanks KevinL for bringing this to my attention.

Based on question 5, What do people need to know about you? I have ranked the four candidates from worst to best.

4 - Jay Aissa
     I would never vote for a candidate who only has business experience.  Government is not a business so Aissa has the wrong skill set.  Just look at Trump for an example.

3 - Robert Deutschmann
     He has some good ideas and would be a good regional councillor but not chair.  Also, I’m not too keen on voting for a lawyer.  I have in the past but I have  ‘trust’ issues with them.

2 - Jan d’Ailly
     He has experience beyond business and has good ideas.  He may get my vote.

1 - Karen Redman
     She has lots of experience in politics and public service.  However, her close ties to the Liberal Party makes me uneasy.  I usually vote left of centre.  So for me it’s a toss up between d’Ailly and Redman.
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(09-01-2018, 09:15 AM)KevinL Wrote: CBC had each candidate for Chair answer a five-question survey.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener...-1.4807139

One of the candidates had trouble counting to one, and listed three issues when asked for just the most important one. The same candidate who wants to reduce spending AND build more roads.

The other three candidates clearly prioritize social issues, including affordable housing and safe injection sites. It's quite the contrast.
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